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A French Encounter

[pgn]
[Event "ECC"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.02.12"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Body, Giles"]
[Black "Earnshaw, Terry"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C02"]
[PlyCount "90"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 {The Advance Variation, usually leading to a slow and
mysterious struggle on the wings.} 3... c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 (5... Bd7 {
is my preference.}) (5... Nge7 {and}) (5... Nh6 {are also played.}) 6. Be2 (6.
a3 {John Watson} 6... c4 (6... f6 {John Watson I have suggested this move as a
good weapon in every edition of 'Play the French', and I'm continually

Exeter Juniors 2½-1½ Torquay Boys Grammar School

This agreeable annual match is always a friendly and well-contested occasion. As usual, most of the games, and therefore the match, could
have had a very different result! Well played all.

Board 1. After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a
wicked trap.

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs TBGS"]
[Site "HSC"]
[Date "2013.02.08"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Blackmore, Joshua"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "64"]

{After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a

Move order

Just a little practical example of something I often talk about: move order in analysis.

If you have a good idea, try it with a different order of moves: it might be even better!

For example:

[pgn]
[Event "Peter Rooke Semi-Final"]
[Site "Teignmouth"]
[Date "2013.01.25"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Amos, J."]
[Black "Ariss, John A"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A20"]
[PlyCount "26"]
[EventDate "2013.01.25"]
[EventType "team-match"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]

1. c4 e5 2. g3 f5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Nc3 O-O 6. e3 a6 7. Nge2 Qe8 8. a3

The Long and the Short of it

I was chatting about score sheets at the club last night - which only go
up to 70-80 moves.

Shortest possible game? Fool's Mate.

[Event "Fool's Mate"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "4"]

1. f4 e6 2. g4 Qh4# *

You don't usually get to play it but you can use the ideas:

[pgn]
[Event "Rex Willis Blitz Gambit Tournament"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2005.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Kuan, Franco"]
[Black "Waters, Simon"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "10"]

Exeter Juniors ½ -3½ Tiverton

I'm a bit bored of writing this, but the result doesn't reflect the closeness of the contests! Great result by Reece, saving us from the whitewash, but some great moves and terrific heart shown by all.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Brinkley, Alan"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C50"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{In a common type of position, Black lost a piece early on. Although Black
found some nice attacking ideas, a Knight got stranded on a5 and White found a

Notes from chess club

I mentioned a few things tonight and last week that I thought you might find interesting:

The Game of Life:
http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
http://www.math.com/students/wonders/life/life.html

The Opera Box Game:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/opera-box-game

The Slav and Semi-Slav:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/slav-or-semi

cheers

D

Exeter Juniors 1 1/2 - 2 1/2 Exeter Gambits

Well, a loss for the juniors, but by the narrowest of margins, and
against a team who were a bit stronger than they looked on paper. A
couple of the Gambits players have had much higher grades in the past,
and in the end I think experience told.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Gambits"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.11.23"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Earnshaw, Terry"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D02"]
[PlyCount "83"]

{Black couldn't get started in the opening and soon lost a piece. Black then
really started playing, creating a counter-attack that was enough

Dr.Dave's Brain Sharpening Kit

Sorry if that sounds a bit alarming!  What I mean is, after the summer break, you might find that your usual tactical sharpness has gone a bit rusty. 

To get back to your normal diamond-honed sharpness, you just need you get your eye back in with some practice.

Some things to practice are:

Towards a self-explanatory chess set

I had a cheerful exchange recently with a correspondent, who wanted to teach her daughter how to play chess, and was attracted to the Children's Chess Set (from Devon's very own House of Marbles).  I like that set a lot, and in a similar vein you can still get hold

Kriegspiel

We were on display last Sunday at CCANW [ http://www.ccanw.co.uk/ ], and one of the things I thought to show the crowds was Kriegspiel - one form of chess that might count as a spectator sport. It's a sort of a cross between chess and battleships. We had a go on Tuesday night with Jeremy, Charlie and Jon.

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PPPPPPPP
RNBQKBNR

White looking North

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
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PPPPPPPP
RNBQKBNR

Umpire

Black looking South

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
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The way it works is this:

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Chess Quotes

"The most important feature of the chess position is the activity of the pieces. This is absolutely fundamental in all phases of the game (opening, middlegame and especially endgame). The primary constraint on a piece's activity is the Pawn structure."
— Michael STEAN, in Simple Chess.