DrDave's blog

Making it up as you go along?

"I thought I would try something different."

This doesn't usually go well! Here are two examples:

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Sidmouth"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.04.28"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Warburton, Ralph"]
[Black "Royle, James"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A60"]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. d4 e6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 Nf6 4. Nc3 d6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 b6 7. e4 Bb7 8. Be2 Nbd7
9. Nf3 g5 10. Bg3 Nh5 11. O-O Nxg3 12. fxg3 Nf6 13. e5 dxe5 14. Nxe5 exd5 15.
Qa4+ Ke7 16. Rae1 Qd6 17. Bf3 Ne4 18. Nxf7 Kxf7 19. Bxe4+ Ke7 20. Bxd5+ Kd8 21.

What's the point of learning opening theory?

A four-board match played away at Exmouth one Saturday:

The top board players each made a mistake on move 5: 1.c4 e5 2.g3 Nc6 3.Bg2 f5 4.Nc3 Nf6 now 5.e3(?) was possibly inaccurate, allowing 5...d5! (see Kosten’s book) but Black didn't play it, preferring 5...Be7.

Devon Team Rapidplay October 2011

Congratulations to Tiverton for winning, thanks to Newton Abbot for hosting and many thanks to Victor Cross for controlling.

Bob's account of the event, with fashion notes: http://www.keverelchess.com/devon-team-blitz-tournament-2011/

Some of my games from the event below; these were reconstructed after the event, so I can't vouch for the accuracy of every move.

[pgn]
[Event "Devon Team Rapidplay"]
[Site "Palm Handheld"]
[Date "2011.10.10"]
[Round "1"]
[White "DR"]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A23"]
[PlyCount "55"]

Updated 'First repertoire' materials

Kevin Hurst has kindly been through the one-stop starter repertoire booklet and found a few errors, mostly small but one was absolutely colossal.

Updated files:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/x/FTP/JuniorRepertoire.pdf
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/x/PGN/juniorep.pgn

Oh, the colossal error? I left out some vital moves in a line of the French Advance:

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6

6.Be2 cxd4 7.cxd4 Nh6 (these moves were omitted)

When the Black Knight comes to h6, White might want to take it.

Modern Classics - the Scotch Gambit

The old Italian-style attacking openings for White have not been played
at the top level of chess for a long while. Was Jonathan Penrose the
last master to venture the Scotch Gambit? Anyhow, even if the masters
have got it all under control, the rest of us can still play in the
Romantic, gambit style. It's also easy to recommend to juniors.

In pursuit of nostalgia, several people have been posting material on
the web about the Scotch Gambit and related openings.

r-bqkbnr
pppp-ppp
--n-----
--------
--BpP---
-----N--
PPP--PPP
RNBQK--R

A Queen sacrifice

I played an extremely boring last-round game at Torquay, choosing the English Defence, which is usually good for a scrap at my level.

Archer-Lock,C - Regis,D Torbay Open Riviera (5), 20.11.2011

1.d4 e6 2.c4 b6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e4 Bb7 5.Bd3 f5 6.Qh5+ g6

The Queen check is supposed to weaken the black King's-side, but it also has some benefits for Black; f5 is strengthened and the g7 square can be a bolt-hole for the black Queen.

7.Qe2 Nf6 8.Bg5 fxe4 9.Bxe4 Bxe4 10.Bxf6 Qxf6 11.Qxe4 Nc6 12.Nf3 0-0 ½-½

Rex Willis Memorial Tournament 2011 - a participant's view

[Just some notes that emerged on Saturday; even if I had written this on
Tuesday night I expect most of the moves would be wrong, so take them
with a pinch or three of salt!]

The Tournament is a Gambit Theme Rapidplay, 10 minutes each with an
obligatory gambit for all players determined for each round.

Round 1: Benko Gambit (White vs Giles)


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 Bxa6

The Benko is a sound gambit; Black gets enough play for the pawn. I
played the most solid moves I could think of, insisting on castling

Nagy-Keen, Friendly, 18 Oct 2011

[pgn]

[Event "Friendly"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2011.10.18"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Nagy, Dan"]
[Black "Keen, Charlie"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B23"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 ({Well, I thought you were planning to play} 3. f4
$1) 3... e6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 {This may not be a bad result, I know Charlie
has been looking to play systems with ...e5 not ...e6.} 5... Bc5 6. Be3 (6. Nb3
$5 {is logical and may give a slight plus} 6... Bb4 7. Be2 (7. Bd2)) (6. Ndb5
$1 {looks best to me, even though it means moving a piece twice.} 6... d6 7.

Pairing of the decade?

[pgn]
[Event "Bygger'n Masters"]
[Site "Gausdal"]
[Date "2006.10.02"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"]
[Black "Time, Jonathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C11"]
[WhiteElo "2306"]
[BlackElo "1864"]
[PlyCount "57"]
[EventDate "2006.09.24"]

1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. d4 c5 6. dxc5 Nc6 7. Bf4 Bxc5 8.
Bd3 f6 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. Qe2 O-O 11. O-O-O a6 12. Rhe1 b5 13. Ne5 Nd4 14. Qd2
Qa5 15. Be3 b4 16. Nb1 Nf5 17. Bxc5 Qxc5 18. Bxf5 exf5 19. Nd3 Qd6 20. Qxb4
Qxh2 21. Nf4 a5 22. Qd4 Qh6 23. Nc3 Bb7 24. Re7 Ne4 25. Kb1 Bc6 26. Ncxd5 Rad8

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Chess Quotes

from: The Psychology of the Chess Player
— Reuben FINE (the man who put the 'anal' into analysis)
"Chess is a contest between two men in which there is considerable ego-involvement. In some way it certainly touches upon the conflicts surrounding aggression, homosexuality, masturbation and narcissism which become particularly prominent in the anal-phallic phases of development. From the standpoint of id psychology, Jones' observations can therefore be confirmed, even enlarged upon. Genetically, chess is more often than not taught to the boy by his father, or a father-substitute, and thus becomes a means of working out the son-father rivalry."

So now you know... It's easy to be dismissive of this, but if you don't think there's anything in it, and are not easily offended, then I invite you to look at a few statements quoted in Dominic Lawson's The Inner Game. The most obvious caution against a psychodynamic interpretation of chess is that Short's anal rape fantasies here seem anything but "unconscious" or "repressed"!