A

Class A (1800-2000)

Dr.Dave's Adventures at East Devon, 2014

I still don't understand why anyone plays the Exchange, except that I
keep getting worse positions against it! Giles has been working on his
chess and is now a serious danger to anyone... I was lucky to find the
cheapo on move 32.

[pgn]
[Event "E. Devon Open"]
[Site "Exeter"]
[Date "2014.02.28"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Body, Giles"]
[Black "Regis, David"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C01"]
[PlyCount "71"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Bd3 Nc6 5. c3 Bd6 6. Qb3 Nge7 7. Ne2 O-O 8.
O-O Re8 9. Be3 Bg4 10. Qc2 h6 11. Ng3 Qd7 12. f3 Bxg3 13. hxg3 Bf5 14. Nd2 Bxd3

Dr.Dave's Adventures at East Devon 2016

Friday night:
My entry to our local congress is sometimes deranged by family visits,
but an expectedly free weekend allowed another excursion in Exeter's
St.George's Hall, now renamed the Corn Exchange.

[It's about as big a hall as a corn exchange would be, but Exeter is a
wool town, not a grain one, and this unhistoric renaming of a post-war
building rather makes me wince. Not as much as the chess, though...]

I have played less this season, quite deliberately; I've been finding
evening chess very hard, and in October even lost to a club member graded

Dr.Dave's Further Adventures at East Devon

East Devon Congress, Open Section, 2007

Four games and no wins is so-so, but the blunder count was reassuringly
low, and I had a good attempt at winning a couple of games, including
the one against Helbig, who was the strongest player I faced. So,
progress of sorts.

{Wretchedly got a bye in the first round. Both players were careless of their
pawns in this game!}

[pgn]
[Event "East Devon"]
[Site "Exeter"]
[Date "2007.02.24"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Regis, D."]
[Black "Cordner, D."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C01"]
[PlyCount "82"]

New starting formations (Tabi'at)

Spanish Torture? The Ruy Lopez

You know when you've been Benko'd

How to mate with Bishop and Knight

Double Bishop Endgames

Club Games - Andrew Pickering at work

Taylor, M (1605) - Pickering, A (2000) (1503) [A21] Exeter vs. Rainham

1. c4 e5 2. g3

[2. Nc3]

2... f5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. e3

  (This is a good formation, going for a central roller, but obviously you need to look out for weak squares)

4... Nc6 5. Nc3 g6 6. d4 e4 7. f3

  (could have been saved up; Black isn't playing ...d5 yet)

7... exf3 8. Nxf3

  (White has a central pawn but must aim at e2-e4)

Steve Homer at work

Wood, DA (2200) - Homer, SJ (Surrey Open ) (2040) (7) [C04] praxis: positional sacrifice in club play, 1988

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nc6 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. e5 Nd7 6. Nb3 f6 7. Bf4 fxe5 8. dxe5 Be7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. Bg3 Nb4 11. Be2 c5 12. O-O a5 13. a3 Nc6 14. c4!? d4 15. Bd3

 

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Chess Quotes

[cool blue cat says:]

COOL TIP: What does Reti mean? He was one of the strongest players of his day, but surely grandmasters are superb calculators! Yes, they are, but often they do not need to calculate something from scratch, because they recognise the type of position they are in, and they know what to play in that sort of position. All the calculating has been done before by someone else, and once you are shown how it works, you can use it and apply it in your own games.
— Dr. Dave.