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Exeter 1½-4½ Newton Abbot (HOME) Sat 25th Jan 2014

Exeter 1½-4½ Newton Abbot Sat 25th Jan 2014

Regis, David 0-1 John Fraser
Marjoram, William 0-1 Nijad Rahimli
Earnshaw, Terry V ½-½ Trefor Thynne
Palmer, Edward John 1-0 Andrew Kinder
Bonds, Thomas S 0-1 Nathan Mills
Finch, Taylor 0-1 John Allen

Exeter 1½-4½ Newton Abbot

A couple of rather under-strength teams met today with Newton Abbot
running out clear winners in a match featuring much enterprising
sacrificial play. Tom Bonds' King's Gambit was met with some robust
tactical ripostes that gave the visitors an early win. Will's

Exeter 3½-2½ Tiverton (AWAY) 4 Jan 2014

Exeter 3½-2½ Tiverton (AWAY) 4 Jan 2014

Boyne (w) 1-0 Edgell (b)
Paulden 1-0 Littlejohns
Regis ½-½ Richardt
Body 0-1 Bartlett
Pope 0-1 Hewson
Earnshaw 1-0 Annetts

Exeter 3½-2½ Tiverton

Giving away plenty of grading points on the lower boards against the
Tiverton All-Stars, we picked up an early win from a dramatic turn-around
on Board 6 and after a win by Andy on top board it was all to play for.
Dave's opponent declined to win the exchange and offered a draw in an OCB
endgame, which left El Presidente to find a way through in a blocked

Tal attacks

[pgn]
[Event "style: Tal on the attack (JUG "]
[Date "1959.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tal, M."]
[Black "Smyslov, V."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B10"]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. e4 c6 (1... e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Nbd7 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.
Nf3 Be7 8. Bd3 c5 9. Qe2 cxd4 10. O-O-O a6 11. Rhe1 Bd7 12. Nxd4 Qa5 13. Nf5 h6
{[#] Tal whips out another unclear sacrifical attack.} 14. Nxg7+ Kf8 15. Bxf6
Bxf6 16. Bc4 Qg5+ 17. Kb1 {[#] Barcza must have had a good old think, but
didn't fancy it.} Bb5 18. Bxb5 Qxg7 19. Ba4 b5 20. Bb3 Bxb2 21. Qe4 Re8 22.

The pieces at their best

How pawns make life easy (and hard) for pieces.

[pgn]
[Event "The best Bishop in the world ever"]
[Date "1970.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Fischer, Robert J"]
[Black "Andersson, Ulf"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A01"]
[PlyCount "85"]

1. b3 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. c4 Nf6 4. e3 Be7 5. a3 O-O 6. Qc2 Re8 7. d3 Bf8 8. Nf3
a5 9. Be2 d5 10. cxd5 Nxd5 11. Nbd2 f6 12. O-O Be6 13. Kh1 Qd7 14. Rg1 Rad8 15.
Ne4 Qf7 16. g4 g6 17. Rg3 Bg7 18. Rag1 Nb6 19. Nc5 Bc8 20. Nh4 Nd7 21. Ne4 Nf8
22. Nf5 Be6 23. Nc5 Ne7 24. Nxg7 Kxg7 {[#]} 25. g5 Nf5 26. Rf3 b6 27. gxf6+ Kh8

Exeter Club Championship & Rapidplay Tournament 2012-2013

Going back in time

This page happened because I wanted a place to store these positions,
but my well-behaved chess databases refuse to do things like
accept a position without a King (see below).

For example, I have had trouble entering this one on a database:

---N--R-
pp---p--
---K--p-
--------
--p-----
---pp--p
---P-pB-
-Q----BR

Mate in ONE (Fischer [not that one]).

[HINT] [SOLUTION]

Proof games

rnbqkb-r
ppp-pppp
--------
---p----
--------
--------
PPPPPPPP
RNBQKB-R

What is the shortest series of legal moves leading to this position?

as-Suli's Diamond

--------
--------
--------
---k----
--------
-KQ-----
--------
q-------
From Wikipedia (English):
The problem called "as-Suli's Diamond" went unsolved for over a thousand years. In shatranj, the "queen" (counsellor) is a very weak piece, able to move only a single square diagonally. It is also possible to win in shatranj by capturing all pieces except the king.

as-Suli commented:

“This ancient position is so difficult that there is no one in the world who would be able to solve it, except those I have taught to do so. I doubt whether anyone did this before me.

Openings Workshop 2013

In contrast to previous instances in this unintentional series... http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/openings-workshop-2008 http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/openings-workshop-2010 http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/openings-workshop-2011 http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/opening-workshop-2012

...questions were expressed this time as a series of dilemmas.

1.e4 or 1.d4?

Short answer: 1.e4, but it's a matter of taste.

Long answer:

1.e4 is likely to lead to open and semi-open games, while 1.d4 is more likely to lead to closed and other more

Lucky escapes

Simon Webb in his book Chess for Tigers identified the "secrets of swindling":
(1) Be objective. The first prerequisite to a swindle is to be objective enough to realize early on when you have a lost position and start playing for a swindle while your position still has resources. If you wait until your position worsens and becomes hopeless, it will be too late.

Middlegame gym

"Failing to plan, is like planning to fail.” ― Stephen McCranie

Test positions in PDF with comments about planning in general

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Chess Quotes

"Before the endgame, the Gods have placed the middle game. "
— Siegbert TARRASCH