J

Juniors

Exeter Juniors 3-1 Sidmouth Juniors

A terrific performance, I've rarely been more proud of a team.

We were giving away nearly 100 grading points over 4 boards, but came out on top without a single loss.

As always, things could have turned out differently, and Sidmouth fought for every square on every board.

{After some vague opening play on both sides, Black dropped an exchange.
After that, White gradually converted but Black had chances to draw (or do
even better) with some little tactics.}

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs Sidmouth"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.03.15"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Hafstad, L."]

Exeter Juniors 2½-1½ Torquay Boys Grammar School

This agreeable annual match is always a friendly and well-contested occasion. As usual, most of the games, and therefore the match, could
have had a very different result! Well played all.

Board 1. After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a
wicked trap.

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs TBGS"]
[Site "HSC"]
[Date "2013.02.08"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Blackmore, Joshua"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "64"]

{After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a

The Greek Gift

The best player of the late 1500s and early 1600s was Gioachino Greco, who showed this
idea in his writings:

[Event "Greek gift"]
[Site "sacrifice on h7 by B"]
[Date "1792.??.??"]
[Round "83"]
[White "greco"]
[Black "Anon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C00"]
[PlyCount "21"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Bd3 Nc6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. h4 O-O 6. e5 6... Nd5 { the
simplest setting for the sacrifice - sometimes known as the Greek Gift
after El Greco's pioneering analysis} 7. Bxh7+ Kxh7 8. Ng5+ Kg8 9. Qh5
Bxg5 10. hxg5 f5 11. g6 1-0

The Long and the Short of it

I was chatting about score sheets at the club last night - which only go
up to 70-80 moves.

Shortest possible game? Fool's Mate.

[Event "Fool's Mate"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "4"]

1. f4 e6 2. g4 Qh4# *

You don't usually get to play it but you can use the ideas:

[pgn]
[Event "Rex Willis Blitz Gambit Tournament"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2005.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Kuan, Franco"]
[Black "Waters, Simon"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "10"]

Exeter Juniors ½ -3½ Tiverton

I'm a bit bored of writing this, but the result doesn't reflect the closeness of the contests! Great result by Reece, saving us from the whitewash, but some great moves and terrific heart shown by all.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Brinkley, Alan"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C50"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{In a common type of position, Black lost a piece early on. Although Black
found some nice attacking ideas, a Knight got stranded on a5 and White found a

Notes from chess club

I mentioned a few things tonight and last week that I thought you might find interesting:

The Game of Life:
http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
http://www.math.com/students/wonders/life/life.html

The Opera Box Game:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/opera-box-game

The Slav and Semi-Slav:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/slav-or-semi

cheers

D

Exeter Juniors 1 1/2 - 2 1/2 Exeter Gambits

Well, a loss for the juniors, but by the narrowest of margins, and
against a team who were a bit stronger than they looked on paper. A
couple of the Gambits players have had much higher grades in the past,
and in the end I think experience told.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Gambits"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.11.23"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Earnshaw, Terry"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D02"]
[PlyCount "83"]

{Black couldn't get started in the opening and soon lost a piece. Black then
really started playing, creating a counter-attack that was enough

Coaching discussions at the Riviera Tournament, 2012

At the Riviera Tournament on Saturday 6th October 2012, I plonked myself in a room and did an all-day drop-in coaching session.

This is what we talked about:

The six basic tactics

Here's eight of them!

The different types of tactic are:

jumps (discovery)
mates
forks
pins/skewers
nets &
ties (undermining and overloading)

Here's one of each:

[Event "2.1 Forks"]
[Site "Italy?, "]
[Date "1801.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greco, G."]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C41"]
[Annotator "An ancient Queen fork"]
[PlyCount "11"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. h3 Nf6 4. c3 4... Nxe4 {
# After the Knight, the piece that is best for forks is the Queen} 5. Qa4+ c6
6. Qxe4 1-0

[pgn]
[Event "2.2 Pins"]
[Site "corr, "]
[Date "1986.??.??"]

Mate with King and Rook against a King

The easiest way to learn is to remember the checkmate position:

[Event "checkmate"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "KR"]
[Black "K"]
[Result "1-0"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "R5k1/8/6K1/8/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 37"]
[PlyCount "0"]

* 1-0

You get checkmate at the edge of the board. You can force the defending King to the edge of the board by using the same idea:

[pgn]
[Event "Forcing position"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "KR"]
[Black "K"]
[Result "1-0"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/8/6k1/R7/6K1/8/8/8 w - - 0 23"]
[PlyCount "3"]

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Chess Quotes

This issue's Colemanballs selection:

"Football today, it's like a game of chess. It's all about money."
NEWCASTLE UNITED FAN, Radio 5 Live
(R. Webb)