psych

The most important mistake in chess

I have been writing about the games from the U14 county team events for many years now (12) and often end up saying the same things. This year we had a couple of particularly clear examples of "the most important mistake in chess" ... which is:

ignoring your opponent's threats!

Here's a simple example:
r--q-rk-
-pp--ppp
p------B
---pPb--
-n-P----
-----NQ-
PPP--PPP
R----RK-
Black has just played 14...Nb4 and White replied with 15.Bh6

Black went ahead with their plan to gobble the c-pawn: 15...Nxc2??

Hopes and fears

I'm going to have to wind into this one from a distance...

Mostly I play chess, but I know how to play some other games, and I'm
sort of generally interested in games in general.

http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/slideshow2

Game theory was much discussed from a mathematical angle when I was in
college, but what interests me more is the thoughts and feelings of game
players, which are usually far from mathematical.

[i]"It seems to us that the theories associated with board reconstruction
experiments represent an idealised picture of master chess which may be

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Chess Quotes

"One of the main aims has been to highlight the differences in appraoch between a Grandmaster and a weaker player, and to try and narrow the gap. To some extent this comes down to technical matters - more accurate analysis, superior opening knowledge, better endgame technique and so forth; but in other respects the difference goes deeper and many readers will find that they need to rethink much of their basic attitude to the game.
— Peter Griffiths, Introduction to Secrets of Grandmaster Chess.