B

Dr.Dave's Adventures at East Devon, 2000

This tournament somehow escaped record until 2016... I was going through a 1.e4 phase in a vain attempt to sharpen my game.

Click on [...] to see games list.

[Event "Exeter Premier"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2000.03.03"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Regis, D."]
[Black "Evans, DK."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C01"]
[WhiteElo "1816"]
[BlackElo "2024"]
[PlyCount "83"]

{It's always nice to start a tournament with a win.  White plays the

A coaching challenge

I played at the East Devon Chess Congress earlier this year alongside my longstanding friend and team-mate Charlie Keen. During a break between games, we went over one of his encounters, looking for tips for next time. The critical position was this one:

Basic Rook Endgames

We lost on board count to old rivals Teignmouth in the Peter Rooke Cup at the end of January. One of the last games to finish involved a simple-looking Rook endgame. Just as it was getting crucial, White, short of time, found a time-saving blunder:
[Event "Peter Rooke Semi-Final"]
[Site "Teignmouth"]
[Date "2013.01.25"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Pope, Sean"]
[Black "Gorodi, John G"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B22"]
[PlyCount "124"]
[EventDate "2013.01.25"]

The Bogoljubow Paradox

"When I am White I win because I am White, when I am Black I win because I am Bogoljubow." - Efim Bogoljubow.

I'm still thinking about this, so bear with me, and comments invited...

I pounced on Nunn's Chess Openings when it came out, and found some things that I found puzzling.  Openings like the Dutch Stonewall, which I had always thought of as being fundamentally flawed, were being shown as equal, while the Classical Dutch - which I thought was a superior approach - was coming out as +=.

Isolated Queen's Pawns - another go

Isolated Queen's Pawns - another go.

If you have an Isolated Queen's Pawn, you have outposts on c5 and e5, a half-open e-file, more space, more mobility, and more chances of attacking - on either side, I guess, but the e5 outpost suggests the King's-side. On a good day, it works like this:

Botvinnik-Vidmar 1936

Examination of a Game 1

"The unexamined life is not worth living" - Socrates "The unexamined game is not worth playing" - Dr.Dave

Warming up 1

Play through this game and see what you think. I have omitted the final moves, which are left as an exercise for the reader.

A Queen sacrifice

I played an extremely boring last-round game at Torquay, choosing the English Defence, which is usually good for a scrap at my level.

Archer-Lock,C - Regis,D Torbay Open Riviera (5), 20.11.2011

1.d4 e6 2.c4 b6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e4 Bb7 5.Bd3 f5 6.Qh5+ g6

The Queen check is supposed to weaken the black King's-side, but it also has some benefits for Black; f5 is strengthened and the g7 square can be a bolt-hole for the black Queen.

7.Qe2 Nf6 8.Bg5 fxe4 9.Bxe4 Bxe4 10.Bxf6 Qxf6 11.Qxe4 Nc6 12.Nf3 0-0 ½-½

What are we going to do now? 1/2

[Event "PC2 12/7/11 23:45"]
[Site "Palm Handheld"]
[Date "2011.07.12"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Southall, Chris"]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r1bq1rk1/2pn1pbp/1p1p1np1/pP2p3/2P5/2N1PN2/PB1PBPPP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 0 10"]
[PlyCount "26"]
1.. d4 {Chris says: "Move 10 was where I wasn't sure what to do. I had
developed my minor pieces and felt like I needed to challenge black's solid

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