G

Lessons from Anand

Anand's easy manner sits on top of a breathtaking attacking verve and capacity for creative counterplay.

Opening

The imaginative attacking finish seems to belong to an earlier era, while the opening play is all modern. The leads to an early release of central tension, and, if Black can develop smoothly, will have no problems. This line is an attempt to prevent Black from developing smoothly, and no end of rule-breaking goes on to that end.

[Event "Biel"]
[Site "Biel"]
[Date "1997.??.??"]
[Round "?"]

Lessons from Carlsen

Carlsen often seems to win without doing anything in particular, but doing it very well. Commentators have tried to explain his peculiar gift by appealing to 'nettlesome' moves, moves that have no obvious dangers, but perhaps are surprisingly awkward to meet.

Opening

Carlsen, particularly when younger, has been noted more for his avoidance of sharp and theoretical lines, than having signature opening systems. He often seems content to aim for a 'normal' White plus in the opening, hoping to build on it later on, particularly in blitz.

Lessons from Kramnik

We have entered an era where it is not always obvious what the best players are doing. They are better than previous generations, they play all positions well, and they are fighting against players who also do everything well, and what makes the difference is not apparent to me.

But while Kramnik's play is subtle and deep, there are games which makes it look as though what he is doing is as simple as it looks.

Opening

Kramnik brought to several apparently settled opening systems a new clarity in pursuing White's main plans. In the Grunfeld, it was White's

Lessons from Karpov

Karpov had a marked preference for positional play, although, in his own words, "if my opponent offers sharp play, I do not object." Karpov had no soft spots that anyone could discern -- an alleged weakness against 'romantic' openings was less of a handicap than the openings some chose against him.

Opening

Karpov has always embraced the need for deep preparation. Here he digs deep into a position that was all the rage at the time.

[Event "Montreal"]
[Site "Montreal CAN"]
[Date "1979.04.25"]
[Round "11"]

Lessons from Boris Spassky

Boris Spassky became World Champion on the second attempt, defeating Petrosian in 1969 and losing his title to Fischer in 1972. He had something of a reputation of having a 'universal' style, able to play all positions well, but that is true of anyone who holds the crown of chess, and he has a marked facility with dynamic and attacking play.

Opening lessons

AGM

Cups were awarded to our worthy winners at the AGM


Paul O'Neill (left) receives the Championship cup from President Tim Paulden


Sean Pope (right) receives the General cup from President Tim Paulden


Paul O'Neill (left) receives the new Rapidplay cup from President Tim Paulden

Opening workshop 2018 part 2

White tries against the Budapest Gambit

An appetiser: the Englund Gambit

Brian complained that he lost quickly facing this line. You might guess he fell into a trap which may be the main hope of Black when playing this line:

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2018.07.24"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Opening Workshop 2018"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "A40"]
[PlyCount "16"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[SourceDate "2018.08.07"]

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