1933: Similar, but different

Game Mallison,HV - Hornbrook,RW, Devon Championship final, 1933

Similar, but different

In this decisive game in the replay of the final of the Devon Championship, Mallison plays a little transposition to which his opponent does not react properly. Hornbrook plays a move which is recommended in one line after play has already led to another, and suffers a brutal punishment. Mallison of course had fine technique and played many long games, but even against his toughest opponents his game collection shows a number of racy miniatures. — DR

King's Gambit Declined (in effect)

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bc5 4. d3 d6 5. f4 Nc6 6. Nf3

This move turns the opening into the King's Gambit Declined. 

[6. f5 would have constituted a variation in the Vienna Game. ]

6...Nd4

This, which is the correct move after 6. f5, is not good here. Better is [6...Bg4 or] [6...Be6]

7. fxe5 Nxf3+

Against Milner-Barry, Sir George Thomas here played the better move:

[7...Ng4 8. Nxd4 [8. exd6 Nf2] 8...Bxd4 9. e6 Qh4+ 10. g3 Bf2+ 11. Ke2 Qh5 12. h3 Ne3+ 13. g4 Qc5 14. exf7+ Kf8 and now could have retained the advantage with 15. Na4]

8. Qxf3 dxe5 9. Bg5

[9. Qg3 leads to the variation played after 9...Qe7 10. Bg5 [10. Qxg7? Rg8] ]

9...c6

[9...Be7 10. Qg3 Qd6 [10...Nh5 11. Qxe5 f6 12. Qb5+ c6 13. Qb3 fxg5 14. Bf7+] 11. Nb5 Qb4+ [11...Qc5 12. Be3] 12. Bd2 Qxb2 13. Bc3 Qxc2 14. Bb3 and wins the Queen]

10. Qg3 Qe7

Black's Queen and Bishop must now interfere with each other to defend the King's Pawn and prevent unpinning of the Knight. 

[10...Bd6 or] [10...Qd6 11. Rf1]

[10...Qd4 11. Rf1 Be7 12. Be3 & Qxe4]

11. Rf1 Kf8

It would have been rather better to give up the Pawn at once in order to castle Queen's-side.  The text move was to prevent White's Qg7 after Bxf6. 

[11...Be6 12. Qxe5 Bxc4 13. Qxe7+ Bxe7 14. dxc4 O-O-O with some drawing chances. ]

[11...Bd7 12. Bxf6 [12. Qh4] 12...gxf6 13. Qg7 O-O-O 14. Qxf6]

12. Qh4 Qd8

+-----------------+
|P)P+.+P)|
|$.+.IR+.|
+-----------------+

13. Bxf6

[13. Rxf6 was a quicker win, winning a piece. ]

13...gxf6 14. Rxf6 Be7 15. Rxf7+

[15. Qh5 leads to the same position after 15...Ke8 [15...Be6 16. Bxe6] 16. Rxf7]

15...Ke8 16. Qh5 Bh4+

[16...Kd7 17. Qf5+ Kc7

[17...Ke8 18. Qxe5 Rg8 [18...Rf8 19. Rxf8+ Kxf8 20. Qh8#] 19. Rxe7+ winning a piece]

18. Qxe5+ Kd7 19. Be6+ Ke8 20. Qxh8+ wins]

17. g3 Qg5 18. Rf8+

[18. Rf8+ Ke7 [18...Kxf8 19. Qf7#] 19. Qxg5+ Bxg5 20. Rxh8 remaining a Rook ahead. ]

1-0

[Notes by HV Mallison]

Chess Quotes

A quote from Richard RETI's Masters of the Chessboard(p 395):
"In general, it can be established that there are two defenses against 1. e4, which make it absolutely impossible for the first player to take any initiative, and which give Black such an even game, without any difficulties at all, that it has now become useless in practice, since these defenses are generally known. They are the Caro-Kann Defense and the variation of the French Game: 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxe4."
Glad that's settled! :-)
— Randy Pals