Attack and Defence

4th_Aug_09 Attack and Defence

Items from the initial list of areas for improvement:

  • - Attacking chess where simplification is not the best option
  • - Defending
  • - When you have to defend something and stop your attack
Fischer-Myagmarsuren Sousse 1967
  • Fischer R. - Miagmasuren L. [A08]
[Event "Sousse izt"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1967.??.??"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Fischer, R."]
[Black "Miagmasuren, L."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A08"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[EventDate "1967.??.??"]

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. g3 c5 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. Ngf3 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. e5
Nd7 9. Re1 b5 10. Nf1 b4 11. h4 a5 12. Bf4 a4 13. a3 {"Believe it or not, I
actually spent more time on this innocuous push (15 minutes) than on any other
move in the game! I didn't want to allow Black to get in ...a3 thereby
creating 'holes' on c3 and a3. On the other hand, by stopping to meet his
positional threat I am forced to postpone my own schemes for at least one move.
Chess is a matter of delicate judgement, knowing when to punch and how to duck.
"} 13... bxa3 14. bxa3 Na5 15. Ne3 Ba6 16. Bh3 d4 17. Nf1 Nb6 18. Ng5 Nd5 19.
Bd2 Bxg5 20. Bxg5 Qd7 21. Qh5 Rfc8 22. Nd2 22... Nc3 {Black can count several
successes here: open b-file, numerous holes, etc., while White has merely
parked a couple of pieces near Black's King.  But because White is playing for
higher stakes, when White does make a threat, Black cannot ignore it.} 23. Bf6
$1 23... Qe8 {
Now Black spends almost the whole of the rest of the game defending.} 24. Ne4
g6 25. Qg5 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 c4 27. h5 27... cxd3 {
Black presses on with a straight face.} 28. Rh4 Ra7 29. Bg2 dxc2 30. Qh6 Qf8
31. Qxh7+ 1-0

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. g3 c5 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. Ngf3 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. e5 Nd7 9. Re1 b5 10. Nf1 b4 11. h4 a5 12. Bf4 a4 13. a3

"Believe it or not, I actually spent more time on this innocuous push (15 minutes) than on any other move in the game! I didn't want to allow Black to get in ...a3 thereby creating 'holes' on c3 and a3. On the other hand, by stopping to meet his positional threat I am forced to postpone my own schemes for at least one move. Chess is a matter of delicate judgement, knowing when to punch and how to duck."

13…bxa3 14. bxa3 Na5 15. Ne3 Ba6 16. Bh3 d4 17. Nf1 Nb6 18. Ng5 Nd5 19. Bd2 Bxg5 20. Bxg5 Qd7 21. Qh5 Rfc8 22. Nd2 Nc3 23. Bf6 Qe8 24. Ne4 g6 25. Qg5 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 c4 27. h5 cxd3 28. Rh4 Ra7 29. Bg2 dxc2 30. Qh6 Qf8 31. Qxh7+ 1-0

Here's another classic Fischer game, where the cut and thrust is more to the fore:

  • Fischer-Rossolimo, USA chp 1965
  • [Event "USA-ch"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "1965.??.??"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Fischer, R."]
    [Black "Rossolimo, N."]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C12"]
    [PlyCount "63"]
    [EventDate "1965.??.??"]
    
    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 4... Bb4 {Mac Cutcheon,n} (4... Be7) (4...
    dxe4) 5. e5 h6 6. Bd2 (6. exf6 hxg5 7. fxg7 Rg8) 6... Bxc3 7. bxc3 (7. Bxc3 $2
    7... Ne4 8. Ba5 $4 (8. Bb4 c5 9. dxc5 9... Nxf2 $1 10. Kxf2 Qh4+) 8... O-O (
    8... b6 9. Bb4 c5 10. Ba3 cxd4 11. Qxd4 Nc6 12. Bb5) 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. Bc3 Nxc3
    11. bxc3 11... f6 $36 {Fischer,R-Petrosian,T  Curacao ct 1962}) 7... Ne4 8. Qg4
    g6 (8... Kf8 9. h4 c5 10. Rh3) 9. Bd3 Nxd2 10. Kxd2 c5 (10... Qg5+ 11. Qxg5
    hxg5 12. g4 $1) 11. Nf3 Nc6 (11... Qc7 { } 12. Qf4 12... f5 $1) (11... Bd7 12.
    dxc5) 12. Qf4 (12. Rab1 { }) 12... Qc7 (12... Qa5 { } 13. Rab1 (13. Rhb1 b6 14.
    a4 Ba6 15. Bb5 Rc8 16. dxc5 bxc5 17. Bxc6+ Rxc6 18. Rb8+ Rc8) 13... b6 14. dxc5
    Qxc5 15. Nd4 Nxd4 16. cxd4 16... Qa5+ $10) (12... g5 13. Qf6 $1 13... Qxf6 14.
    exf6 g4 15. Ne5 cxd4 16. cxd4 Nxd4 17. h3 $16) 13. h4 (13. Qf6 $1 13... Rg8 14.
    h4 Qa5 (14... h5 $8) 15. h5 $1 15... gxh5 16. Rxh5 cxd4 17. Rah1 $40) 13... f5
    $1 $10 14. g4 cxd4 15. cxd4 15... Ne7 $2 (15... Bd7 {Rossolimo,N} 16. gxf5 gxf5
    (16... exf5 17. Qg3 Ne7 18. e6 $1 18... Qa5+ 19. c3 Bxe6 20. Rhe1 $40) 17. Rhg1
    O-O-O 18. Rg6 $16) 16. gxf5 exf5 17. Bb5+ $1 17... Kf8 $2 (17... Nc6 18. Bxc6+
    bxc6 (18... Qxc6 19. e6 $1 19... Bxe6 20. Ne5 Qd6 21. Nxg6 Qxf4+ 22. Nxf4 $18)
    19. Rhg1) (17... Bd7 18. Bxd7+ Qxd7 19. e6 $1) (17... Kd8 $1 { } 18. Bd3 18...
    Be6 $16) 18. Bd3 Be6 19. Ng1 $1 {  Ng1-...-f4} 19... Kf7 20. Nh3 20... Rac8 $5
    { } (20... Rag8) 21. Rhg1 b6 (21... Qc3+ 22. Ke3 Nc6 23. Rab1 Nb4 24. Rxb4 $1
    24... Qxb4 25. h5 Rcg8 26. hxg6+ Rxg6 27. Rxg6 Qe1+ 28. Kf3 Kxg6 29. Qh4 $1
    29... Qd1+ 30. Kg2 Rg8 31. Kh2 $1 $18) 22. h5 $1 22... Qc3+ 23. Ke2 Nc6 (23...
    Rcg8 24. hxg6+ Rxg6 (24... Nxg6 25. Qf3) 25. Qh4 $18) (23... g5 24. Nxg5+ $1
    24... hxg5 25. Qxg5 Ke8 26. Qf6 Kd7 27. Bb5+ $1 27... Rc6 28. Qxh8 Qxc2+ 29.
    Kf1 $18) 24. hxg6+ Kg7 (24... Ke7 25. Qh4+ Kd7 26. Rad1 $1 26... Qxd4 (26...
    Nxd4+ $2 27. Qxd4 $1) 27. Nf4 $1) 25. Rad1 $1 25... Nxd4+ (25... Qxd4 26. Kf1
    $1 26... Qxe5 27. Re1 Qxf4 28. Nxf4 Bd7 29. Nh5+ $18) 26. Kf1 Rhe8 27. Rg3 (27.
    Qh4 27... Nf3 $1 28. Qf6+ Kg8 29. Bxf5 Nh2+ 30. Kg2 Qf3+ 31. Kxh2 Qxf5) 27...
    Nc6 28. Qh4 Nxe5 (28... Qxe5 29. Nf4 $18) 29. Nf4 Ng4 30. Nxe6+ $1 30... Rxe6
    31. Bxf5 Qc4+ 32. Kg1 $1 $8 (32. Kg1 $1 $8 32... Nxf2 33. Qxc4 Rxc4 34. Kxf2
    Rf4+ 35. Rf3 $18) 1-0
    

Successful attack

  • Jepps,G - Regis,D [C00] East Devon Exeter (4), 2005
  • [Event "East Devon"]
    [Site "Exeter"]
    [Date "2005.05.04"]
    [Round "4"]
    [White "Jepps, G."]
    [Black "Regis, D."]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C00"]
    [PlyCount "37"]
    
    1. d4 e6 2. e4 d5 3. Be3 dxe4 4. f3 Nf6 5. fxe4 Nxe4 6. Nd2 Nf6 7. Ngf3 Nbd7 8.
    Bd3 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Qe1 c5 11. Qh4 cxd4 12. Bg5 g6 13. Ne4 Re8 14. Ne5 Nxe4
    15. Rxf7 Nxg5 16. Bxg6 Nf3+ 17. gxf3 Bxh4 18. Bxh7+ Kh8 19. Ng6# 1-0
    

1.d4 e6 2.e4 d5 3.Be3 dxe4 4.f3 Nf6 5.fxe4 Nxe4 6.Nd2 Nf6 7.Ngf3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Qe1 c5 11.Qh4 cxd4 12.Bg5 g6 13.Ne4 Re8 14.Ne5 Nxe4 15.Rxf7 Nxg5 16.Bxg6 Nf3+ 17.gxf3 Bxh4 18.Bxh7+ Kh8 19.Ng6# 1-0

Successful defence

  • Steinitz - Vasques [C11] Havana, 1888
  • [Notes in PGN/Palview]
  • [Event "Havana"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "1888.??.??"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Steinitz"]
    [Black "Vasques"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C11"]
    [PlyCount "59"]
    
    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Be7 6. Nxf6+ Bxf6 7. Bxf6 Qxf6
    8. Nf3 O-O 9. c3 b6 10. Ne5 Nd7 11. Ng4 Qf4 12. Be2 Bb7 13. O-O f5 14. Ne3
    14... Rf6 {# Lots of suggestions here, but Steinitz comes up with the
    paradoxical manoeuvre Re1 and Nf1, relocating his most forward piece! 
    Steinitz was known for making the most awkward and cramped defensive
    manoeuvres, but this is much more comprehensible.  Re1 actually contains the
    seeds of his counterplay and eventual victory, since if White is allowed to
    gang up on e6, Black will struggle.} 15. Re1 Rh6 16. Nf1 Nf6 17. Bf3 Ne4 18.
    Re3 Rf8 19. Qa4 {Having secured his defences, White  moves towards getting
    some counterplay, at the same time denying Black the post ...Bd5 because of c4.
    } 19... a5 20. Rae1 20... Rd8 {That's rather a revealing move: Black has got
    his pieces to the top of the hill, and has to march this one down again.} 21.
    Ng3 Qh4 22. h3 {It's getting critical now: White is forced to make a weakening
    pawn move, but Black's own weaknesses prove the more important.} 22... Nxf2 23.
    Bxb7 Nxh3+ 24. gxh3 Rg6 25. Bg2 Rf8 26. Qc4 Kh8 27. Qxc7 f4 28. Rf1 Rxg3 29.
    Qd6 Rd8 30. Rxf4 {
    A triumph of defensive technique, from the man who invented it.} 1-0
    

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxe4 5.Nxe4 Be7 6.Nxf6+ Bxf6 7.Bxf6 Qxf6 8.Nf3 0-0 9.c3 b6 10.Ne5 Nd7 11.Ng4 Qf4 12.Be2 Bb7 13.0-0 f5 14.Ne3 Rf6 15.Re1 Rh6 16.Nf1 Nf6 17.Bf3 Ne4 18.Re3 Rf8 19.Qa4 a5 20.Rae1 Rd8 21.Ng3 Qh4 22.h3 Nxf2 23.Bxb7 Nxh3+ 24.gxh3 Rg6 25.Bg2 Rf8 26.Qc4 Kh8 27.Qxc7 f4 28.Rf1 Rxg3 29.Qd6 Rd8 30.Rxf4 1-0

Unsuccessful attack

  • Morgan,J - Southall,C [A40] Club Championship 08/09 (5) 2009
  • [Notes in PGN/Palview]
  • [Event "Club Championship 08/09"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2009.05.10"]
    [Round "5"]
    [White "Morgan, Jon"]
    [Black "Southall, Chris"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "A40"]
    [PlyCount "62"]
    
    {In a way, I think this was a game with a simple story: White had no other
    plan than a King's-side attack, and while pursuing it made too many
    concessions, so that when the game reached its crisis Black had too many
    trumps.  It wouldn't have taken much of a mistake by Black to let you in, but
    he defended well enough.    How are you going to win games like this in the
    future?  You can work on attacking technique, of course, but I wonder if
    having a wider range of interpretations of your opening system would also help.
    There were a couple of moments in the opening where I think you could have
    picked up the 'better structure' card; three or four cards like that and you
    have a win.  As  it happened, Black was the one picking up the long-term cards.
    The attack succeeds when you have reason to attack, and while you had the will
    I never thought you had sufficient reason (like better development, more space,
    or central control).    Which leads me to the other story: attacks on the wing
    are often decided by control of the centre.  10.exf4 left Black in control of
    the central light squares and White was short of ideas.  I did analyse one
    line, after the point where White had lost on time, where White finally got a
    King's-side break in, and that was when White had wrestled control of the
    centre.  So, one aspect of attacking technique is keeping the centre at least
    under observation if not control.  In this game, you rather abandoned it, and
    that caught up with you.} 1. d4 1... b5 2. Nf3 (2. e4 {is of course critical,
    equally, Chris is experienced in that type of position, so I can't criticise
    you for ducking that sort of confrontation.}) 2... a6 3. c3 Bb7 4. Bf4 {
    Probably nothing wrong with this formation but you're not doing anything to
    set Black problems, given his provocative opening.} (4. a4 $1 {
    leads to White having the better structure:} 4... Nf6 (4... e6 5. axb5 axb5 6.
    Rxa8 Bxa8 7. Qb3 c6 (7... Bc6 8. Na3)) (4... bxa4) 5. e3 bxa4 6. Rxa4) 4... e6
    5. e3 Nf6 6. h3 Bd6 7. Ne5 (7. Bxd6 $1 7... cxd6 8. a4 bxa4 9. Rxa4 {
    leaves Black with a number of weaknesses.}) (7. Bd3 $5 {is one idea:} 7... Bxf4
    8. exf4 d6 9. f5) 7... O-O 8. Nd2 Nd5 9. Bd3 {Hmm, tell me again why you
    played h3?  The idea of the gambit is by no means a bad one, but moves like h3
    don't fit in so well with a gambit.} (9. Bh2 f6 10. Nef3 (10. e4 {
    sadly doesn't work:} 10... fxe5 11. dxe5 Bc5 12. exd5 Bxf2+ 13. Ke2 Qg5) 10...
    Bxh2 11. Rxh2) (9. Ndf3 Nxf4 10. exf4 f6 11. Nd3) 9... Nxf4 10. exf4 10... f5
    $1 (10... Bxg2 11. Rg1 Bd5 12. Qg4 $1 (12. Qh5 f5) 12... Qf6 13. Qh5 $1 13...
    g6 14. Nxg6 $1 {you both saw all this of course...} 14... fxg6 15. Bxg6 hxg6
    16. Rxg6+ Kf7 17. Rxf6+ Kxf6 18. O-O-O Nc6 19. Rg1 {may be only equal}) (10...
    f6 11. Qh5 $1) 11. Rh2 {
    That's a definite concession, forced by your weak f4 pawn.} (11. Rg1 Qh4 12.
    Qe2 Qxf4) (11. Ndf3 $5 11... Be7 12. Bc2) 11... c5 12. Ndf3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 {
    That's your best piece!  You don't want to be swapping Black's Queen's-side
    pieces for your King's-side pieces.} (13. Qe2) 13... Bxc6 14. Ne5 Bb7 15. g4 $5
    15... cxd4 16. cxd4 Bb4+ 17. Kf1 17... Bd5 {Black can count a few assets in
    his favour (two Bishops, better structure, etc.) while White has not much to
    show yet.} 18. a3 (18. gxf5 exf5 19. Qh5 g6) 18... Be7 19. g5 ({
    Hindsight suggests the White needs to open lines with} 19. gxf5 {
    but White can't get through even then:} 19... exf5 20. Qh5 $1 20... d6 $1 21.
    Bxf5 $5 21... Rxf5 22. Qxf5 dxe5 23. dxe5 Bc4+ 24. Kg1 24... Qd4 {
    and Black's Bishops rule.}) 19... d6 20. Nf3 20... Qb6 {White's has some space
    and a pawn roller to work with, so Black sets about making a nuisance
    elsewhere.} 21. Be2 Rfc8 22. h4 Ra7 23. h5 Rac7 24. Ne1 {"Set up your attacks
    so that, when the fire is out, it isn't out!"   White has been telegraphing
    his intention to deliver mate on the King's-side for some time, but really has
    only the Rook in play there.  Meanwhile, Black adds the c-file to his
    collection of trumps.} 24... a5 25. b4 a4 26. Rb1 {These Queen's-side moves by
    White are a sign that something has gone wrong: sadly, Black can blockade the
    files leading to his King, so White has nothing much left to do, and Black can
    cash some of his trumps.} 26... Rc3 27. Bf3 Bxf3 28. Nxf3 Rxa3 ({
    Black should take over the light squares, I think:} 28... Qc6 29. Rh3 Qe4 30.
    h6 g6 31. Kg2 R8c4 32. Ra1 32... Rd3 {with complete domination.}) 29. Qe2 d5
    30. Ne5 Qxd4 31. Ng6 $1 31... Kf7 {(time)} (31... hxg6 $4 32. Qxe6+) (31... Kf7
    {and White is not lost and may not even be losing:} 32. Re1 Qb6 33. Nxe7 Kxe7
    34. Qe5 34... Kf8 {when White finally has enough of a grip on the centre to
    make a King's-side break.} 35. h6 $1) 0-1
    

1.d4 b5 2.Nf3 a6 3.c3 Bb7 4.Bf4 e6 5.e3 Nf6 6.h3 Bd6 7.Ne5 0-0 8.Nd2 Nd5 9.Bd3 Nxf4 10.exf4 f5 11.Rh2 c5 12.Ndf3 Nc6 13.Nxc6 Bxc6 14.Ne5 Bb7 15.g4 cxd4 16.cxd4 Bb4+ 17.Kf1 Bd5 18.a3 Be7 19.g5 d6 20.Nf3 Qb6 21.Be2 Rfc8 22.h4 Ra7 23.h5 Rac7 24.Ne1 a5 25.b4 a4 26.Rb1 Rc3 27.Bf3 Bxf3 28.Nxf3 Rxa3 29.Qe2 d5 30.Ne5 Qxd4 31.Ng6 Kf7 0-1

Lessons from this game:
  • White developed as he intended to, and attacked as he intended to, without heed to Black's actual set-up.
  • Black offers White a target on move 1, which White ignores.
  • gxf5 was a chance to open up lines -- perhaps the position is still better for Black, but White spends the rest of the game unsuccessfully trying to prise open the Black King's-side.
  • The Move-all-the-pieces-over-and-checkmate plan can work, but it works when the centre is either blocked (Fischer's KIA and Brian's Stonewall) or is owned by the attacking side.
  • White lost some tempi earlier on (c3 and h3) which could have been put to better use.
  • The game is an argument for greater flexibility in setting up your attacks -- if White had spent some time tying Black down to defence on the Queen's-side, a later switch to the King's-side might have been decisive.

Topic: 

Class: 

Legacy nid: 

158

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