Chess Quotes 695

In article <473jk9$phu@condor.ic.net> rasor@mail.ic.net writes:
>An excerpt from Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan POE:
" Yet to calculate is not in itself to analyze. A chess-player, for example, does the one without effort at the other. It follows that the game of chess, in its effects upon mental character, is greatly misunderstood. I am not now writing a treatise, but simply prefacing a somewhat peculiar narrative by observations very much at random; I will, therefore, take occasion to assert that the higher powers of the reflective intellect are more decidedly and more usefully tasked by the unostentatious game of draughts than by all the elaborate frivolity of chess. In this latter, where the pieces have different and bizarre motions, with various and variable values, what is only complex is mistaken (a not unusual error) for what is profound. The attention is here called powerfully into play. If it flag for an instant, an oversight is committed, resulting in injury or defeat. The possible moves being not only manifold but involute, the chances of such oversights are multiplied; and in nine cases out of ten it is the more concentrative rather than the more acute player who conquers."
Comment by DR
— -- POE

Chess Quotes

"If you have any doubt what to study, study endgames. Openings teach you openings. Endings teach you chess."
— Stephan GERZADOWICZ, Thinker's Chess.