Exeter Juniors ½ -3½ Tiverton

I'm a bit bored of writing this, but the result doesn't reflect the closeness of the contests! Great result by Reece, saving us from the whitewash, but some great moves and terrific heart shown by all.

[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Brinkley, Alan"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C50"]
[PlyCount "65"]
{In a common type of position, Black lost a piece early on.  Although Black
found some nice attacking ideas, a Knight got stranded on a5 and White found a
mate down the e-file.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 (3... Nf6 {
is more likely to give you an interesting game - see the yellow book!}) 4. O-O
{A bit early.} 4... Nf6 5. d3 5... O-O {Again.  It's an odd feature of this
position  that castling is not such a good move as usual.  Why?  Let's see...}
6. h3 {Zzz...} ({Suppose White chooses instead} 6. Nc3 6... d6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4
{Now you can't afford to keep chasing because of} 8... g5 9. Nxg5 $1 9... hxg5
10. Bxg5 {White has excellent chances of checkmating you, and is likely to get
the piece back (Nd5, Qf3).}) 6... d6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4 {Now, this is a very
common type of position in junior games (Old Stodge), so you should know some
of the ideas.  If you don't know the ideas, perhaps the best way forward is to
avoid Old Stodge!} 8... b6 $6 {
This leaves your Bc5 with no retreat.  Your Bc8 can already get out, so} (8...
g5 9. Nxg5 {still looks dangerous.}) ({I think the best move is} 8... Be6 $1 9.
Bxe6 (9. Bb3 $1) 9... fxe6 10. Nc3 (10. c3 d5) 10... Qe8 $1 {idea ...Nh5-f4}) (
{Another idea in these positions is to grab the Bishop pair with} 8... Na5 {
e.g.} 9. Bb5 c6 10. Ba4 b5 11. Bb3 Nxb3 12. axb3) 9. a3 $1 9... Bb7 $4 {
So, why did White play his last move?  What has changed about the position?}
10. b4 $1 10... Bd4 11. c3 Bxf2+ 12. Bxf2 Re8 13. Re1 d5 14. exd5 Nxd5 15. Bxd5
Qxd5 16. c4 Qd7 17. b5 17... Na5 {Where can the poor Knight go next?} (17...
Nd8 18. Rxe5 Ne6) 18. Rxe5 Rxe5 19. Nxe5 Qf5 20. Bg3 20... Qg5 {
Black has some nasty threats.} 21. Kh2 f6 22. Nf3 Qg6 23. Nc3 Re8 24. Ra2 Re3
25. Re2 Rxd3 26. Qe1 Rd8 (26... Bxf3 27. gxf3 Rxf3) 27. Nh4 Qh5 28. Nd5 28...
Nxc4 {The Knight re-enters the game, a bit too late to do anything.} 29. Nf4
Qf7 (29... Qxb5 $1) 30. Nfg6 Nxa3 31. Re7 $1 31... Qd5 {
Both sides threaten checkmate!} 32. Re8+ Kf7 33. Qe7# 1-0
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kelly, Edmund"]
[Black "Thorpe-Tracey, Stephen"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "120"]
{After a promising start, White ran out of ideas and then ran out of pawns.} 1.
e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 3... d6 $6 4. dxe5 ({If you find it hard to win the
positions after 4.dxe5, there's nothing wrong with} 4. Bc4) 4... dxe5 5. Qxd8+
Kxd8 6. Bc4 6... f6 {All great stuff so far.} 7. O-O (7. Be3 $1 {
is the most accurate, as it takes away Black's ...Bc5 move.}) 7... Bd7 8. Nc3
Nge7 9. Be3 Na5 10. Bd3 (10. Be2 {leaves open the d-file.}) 10... a6 11. Rad1
Ke8 12. Rfe1 {There's nothing for the Rook to do here.} (12. Rd2 $1 12... Rd8
13. Rfd1 $1 {is very natural, occupying the only open file.}) 12... Rd8 13. Nd5
$6 {I think that helps Black get sorted out.  He was having problems finding a
home for all his pieces - for example, three pieces want to sit at c6!} 13...
Nxd5 14. exd5 Bd6 15. Be2 15... b6 {You're fully developed, so it's time to
think about your plans in this position.  Now, look at the pawns.  You have 4
vs 3 on the Queen's-side, and so one plan is to push forward your pawns there.
If the pieces don't tell you what to do, the pawns will.} 16. Bd2 16... Bb5 {
Black offers to swap his better Bishop for White's worse one?} 17. Bxb5+ axb5
18. b3 Nb7 19. h3 {DLRPM} 19... Kf7 20. Nh4 g6 21. Nf3 {
Oh dear, you really are out of ideas!} 21... Bc5 22. Be3 Bxe3 23. Rxe3 Nd6 24.
Nd2 Nf5 25. Rc3 Rd7 26. Nf3 (26. Ne4) 26... Rc8 27. g4 {
Forces Black to win a pawn!} 27... Ne7 $1 {Now you need to find something
special, or you are going to sink.  There isn't always anything special in the
position, but this time there was.} 28. d6 (28. g5 $1 28... Nxd5 29. Rc6 $1
29... e4 30. c4 $1) 28... cxd6 29. Rxc8 Nxc8 30. Rd5 Rc7 31. Ne1 Rc5 32. Rxc5 {
Oh no! Don't swap pieces when you're losing!} (32. Rd2) 32... bxc5 33. Kg2 (33.
a4 {makes use of your one advantage.}) 33... Ke6 34. c4 $1 34... bxc4 35. bxc4
35... Nb6 $1 {Not that hard to see coming.} 36. Kf3 Nxc4 37. a4 d5 38. Ke2 e4
39. f3 exf3+ 40. Nxf3 g5 41. h4 h6 42. hxg5 hxg5 43. Kf2 Kd6 44. Ke2 Kc6 45.
Ne1 Kb6 46. Kf2 Nb2 47. Nc2 Nxa4 48. Ne3 Nc3 49. Ke1 d4 50. Nc4+ Kc6 51. Na5+
Kd5 52. Nb3 c4 53. Nd2 Ne4 54. Nf3 d3 55. Kf1 c3 56. Ne1 Kc4 57. Kg2 c2 58.
Nxc2 dxc2 59. Kf3 Kd4 60. Kg2 c1=Q 0-1
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Knowles, John"]
[Black "Finch, Taylor"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E57"]
[PlyCount "49"]
{Black found lots of good ideas but tripped over when White put together some
threats.  In the end, Black's structure was always hard to defend, as you had
dark-square holes all over your King's-side and no dark-square Bishop, but the
attack down the c-file was definitely worth something.  Have a look at a
couple of example games, where Black manages to win from this sort of
structure.} 1. d4 (1. e4 c5 2. c3 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 d5 6. exd5
Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Be2 {over-cautious...} 8... Nxd5 (8... Nbd7 {
-  Videki,S-Lenart,E/Szekszard 1994 (24)}) 9. O-O Nc6 (9... b6 {
De Jong,P-Litmanowicz,A/Hoogoven 1984/ -  (33)}) 10. Qb3 (10. Nxd5 {
Hatipoglu,M-Chatalbashev,B/Saraybahce GP 2002/The Week in Chess 407/0-1 (57)})
(10. Be3 {Rezak,M-Bednarska,M/Tatry Open 2001/The Week in Chess 361/0-1 (40)})
(10. Bg5 {0-1 Seidler-Brond/Mar del Plata 1976 (51)}) (10. h3 {
0-1 Erker,E-Bengfort,W/Dortmund 1987 (39)}) 10... Nxc3 11. bxc3 {This structure
is pretty much the same as in your game, but notice the differences too.} 11...
Na5 (11... b6 {Teran Alvarez,I-Teijeiro,A/Matalascanas ch-SPA 1995/ -  (41)}) (
11... e5 {Muuss-Drasic/Bozen 1987/1-0 (33)}) 12. Qb4 Be6 13. Ba3 Bf6 (13... Re8
) (13... Bd5) 14. Rfd1 Rc8 15. Ne5 Qc7 16. Ng4 Bg5 (16... Bxg4) 17. Qc5 (17. d5
) 17... Qxc5 18. Bxc5 b6 19. Bb4 h5 (19... Bc4) 20. Ne3 Nc4 21. Nxc4 Bxc4 22.
Bf3 (22. Re1) 22... Rfd8 23. Ba3 (23. Re1 Kf8) 23... Bd5 24. Bxd5 Rxd5 25. Bb2
(25. Rd3) 25... Rc4 26. g3 e6 27. f4 Be7 28. Re1 Bd6 29. Re2 Kg7 30. Kg2 h4 31.
Rc1 hxg3 32. hxg3 g5 33. Rf2 gxf4 34. gxf4 Rf5 35. Rcf1 Rb5 36. Rg1 (36. Rc1 {
was played, but he never took his hand off it...} 36... Bxf4) 36... Kf6 37. Ba1
(37. Kf3) 37... Rf5 38. Rgf1 Rc8 (38... Rb5) 39. Rf3 (39. Kf3 Rxf4+ 40. Ke3
Rxf2 41. Rxf2+ Ke7 42. a4 f5 43. Kd3 Kf6) 39... Rg8+ (39... Rb5) 40. Rg3 Rxg3+
41. Kxg3 Ra5 42. Rf2 42... Kf5 { zugzwang!} 43. c4 Ra3+ 44. Kh4 (44. Kg2 Bxf4
45. c5) (44. Rf3 Bxf4+ 45. Kf2 Rxa2+) 44... Be7+ {
0-1 Pope,S-Regis,D/Exeter Club Ch'p 2003} (44... Be7+ 45. Kh5 Rh3#)) 1... d5 2.
Nf3 (2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. Rc1 dxc4 8. e3 c5
9. Bxc4 cxd4 10. exd4 $5 {  Playing for the win.} 10... Nc6 11. O-O Nh5 12.
Bxe7 Nxe7 13. Bb3 (13. Ne5) 13... Nf6 14. Ne5 Bd7 15. Qe2 15... Rc8 {} 16. Ne4
$2 {The wrong plan, with no real justification. Keep the pieces on if you have
more space!} 16... Nxe4 17. Qxe4 Bc6 18. Nxc6 Rxc6 19. Rc3 $6 (19. Rxc6 Nxc6
20. d5 {exchanges the IQP leaving nothing much left to play for.}) 19... Qd6
20. g3 $6 20... Rd8 21. Rd1 Rb6 22. Qe1 Qd7 23. Rcd3 Rd6 24. Qe4 Qc6 25. Qf4
25... Nd5 {} 26. Qd2 Qb6 27. Bxd5 $2 {The Bishop was a compensating plus.} (
27. a3) 27... Rxd5 28. Rb3 {Wch30-Merano} 28... Qc6 29. Qc3 29... Qd7 {} 30.
f4 {looks impetuous, but ...e5 was threatened} 30... b6 31. Rb4 b5 32. a4 bxa4
33. Qa3 a5 34. Rxa4 34... Qb5 {There is more tension on the Queen's-side now,
and White is getting stretched (principle of two weaknesses).} 35. Rd2 35... e5
$1 36. fxe5 Rxe5 37. Qa1 Qe8 38. dxe5 Rxd2 39. Rxa5 { White's pawn has
survived, and White is even a pawn up!  But White has allowed a monster Rook
on the seventh - Black has transformed a structural advantage into a dynamic
one.} 39... Qc6 40. Ra8+ Kh7 41. Qb1+ g6 42. Qf1 Qc5+ (42... Qxa8 {Wch30-Merano
} 43. Qxf7+ Kh8 44. Qf6+ Kg8 45. Qxg6+ Kh8) 43. Kh1 Qd5+) 2... Nf6 3. c4 e6 4.
Nc3 c5 5. e3 Nc6 6. Be2 dxc4 7. Bxc4 cxd4 8. exd4 Bb4 (8... Be7) 9. O-O 9...
O-O {This position can arise from the Caro-Kann and Nimzo-Indian!} 10. a3 Bxc3
11. bxc3 11... Nd5 $6 {A good middlegame idea, but in the opening, you must
develop as quickly as you can.} (11... a6) (11... b6) (11... Qc7 $1 {idea ...e5
}) 12. Qc2 a6 (12... Na5 13. Bd3 h6 14. c4) (12... Qc7) (12... b6) 13. Bd3 g6 (
13... h6 {is much safer; you have given up the dark-squared Bishop, so you
will find it hard to control dark-squared holes.}) 14. Bh6 $1 14... Re8 15.
Rfe1 b5 16. h4 Nce7 17. Ne5 Bb7 18. h5 $1 {White is playing consistently to
tray and crash through on g6, but the defence is holding.} 18... f5 $6 {
blocks the diagonal but weakens both e6 and g6} (18... Nf5 $5 19. Bd2 f6 20.
Nf3 20... Nb6 {and Black is keeping White at bay.}) 19. hxg6 hxg6 (19... Nxg6
$5) 20. Bg5 Qc7 21. Rac1 Qa5 ({After} 21... Rac8 $1 {we looked at} 22. Bd2
22... Kg7 {when White is better but Black still has some ideas for counterplay.
}) 22. Qb3 Rac8 23. Bxe7 $1 23... Nxe7 $2 (23... Rxe7 $1 {
is better, but your King is still very exposed after} 24. Nxg6 Rec7 25. Rxe6
Rxc3 26. Rxc3 Rxc3 27. Qd1) 24. Qxe6+ Kf8 (24... Kh7 25. Qf7+ Kh6 26. Ng4+ $1
26... fxg4 27. Rxe7 $1 {mates}) 25. Qf7# 1-0
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Whittington, Reece"]
[Black "Annetts, Ivor"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D52"]
[PlyCount "90"]
{White was struggling after finding a clever idea in the opening, as it led to
all White's active pieces disappearing.  But Black couldn't make use of his
advantages and a draw was a fine result for the junior side on top board.} 1.
d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 Nbd7 6. e3 6... dxc4 {Surprising: I
thought he was going for the Cambridge Springs.  Usually they wait for Bd3
before taking on c4.} 7. Bxc4 b5 8. Bd3 (8. Bb3 {
is also OK, thinking about Bc2 and Qd3}) 8... Bb7 9. a3 (9. O-O $1 9... b4 10.
Ne4 h6 11. Bxf6 Nxf6 12. Qc2) 9... a6 10. Qc2 10... c5 $1 11. dxc5 11... Bxc5 {
White has five pieces in play, Black four, and it's White's turn.} 12. Bxh7 $6
(12. e4 $1) 12... Rxh7 13. Qxh7 Nxh7 14. Bxd8 14... Rxd8 {Now White has four
pieces but only two in play.  Black has all of his five pieces in play.} 15. h4
Nhf6 16. h5 $6 {That pawn is hard to look after, so far away from home.} 16...
Ke7 17. b4 Bb6 18. Ke2 18... Rh8 $1 19. Rag1 (19. a4 $1 {
You need to get some pawns off fast.}) 19... Rxh5 20. Rxh5 Nxh5 21. g4 (21. a4)
21... Nhf6 22. g5 Ne4 23. Nxe4 Bxe4 24. Nd4 Bd5 25. f4 g6 26. Rc1 Bc4+ (26...
e5) 27. Kf2 27... Bxd4 {Black decides that creating an extra weakness on d4 is
worth giving up the Bishop pair.} 28. exd4 Kd6 29. Rh1 Ke7 30. Ke3 Bd5 31. Ra1
{Black needs a firm plan in time trouble, but dithers.} 31... Nb6 32. Kd2 Nc4+
33. Kc3 Nb6 (33... Nd6) 34. Kd2 Kd7 35. Kc3 Bb7 36. Kd3 Nd5 37. Rf1 a5 38. bxa5
38... b4 $5 39. Ra1 Ba6+ 40. Kc2 bxa3 41. Rxa3 Nxf4 42. Rb3 (42. Rf3 Ne2 43.
Rxf7+ Kd6 44. Ra7 Nxd4+ 45. Kd2 Bb5 46. Rg7) 42... Nd5 43. Rf3 Ke7 44. Kb3 Bb7
45. Rf2 Nc7 1/2-1/2

Topic: 

Class: 

Legacy nid: 

1291