Exeter Juniors 1-3 Exeter School 22nd May 2015

Exeter Juniors 1-3 Exeter School 22nd May 2015

default 0-1 Leif HAFSTAD
Ethan HWANG 1-0 Henry COLEMAN
Felix WATTS 0-1 Redmond COLEMAN
Ned RICHARDS 0-1 Nick ARMSTRONG

In a close match, where many of the players relied for support on a
mysterious brown elixir, the visiting team had an early boost when the
home team top board didn't arrive.

It looked as though the home team was going to score a rapid equaliser
when a mate-in-one appeared on board 3, but the opportunity passed by.
The material balance wobbled several times before Redmond found a
back-rank mate later in the game.

Some excellent aggressive play from both sides on board 4 was also
brought to a close when Nick spotted a snap mate.

In the best game of the match, Henry tripled down the e-file, pinning
down all of Black's pieces. Ethan then sent his Queen off in search of
counterplay, but it became cut off from the e-file, whence White could
have delivered the fatal blow. But the Queen proved distracting
enough, and gradually Black unhooked the pin and exchanged off
into a Rook endgame. White then allowed a Rook exchange when Black had
a distant passed pawn, and the home team finally scored a point.

Games to follow.

Games

[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Exeter School"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Armstrong, Nick"]
[Black "Richards, Ned"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C40"]

{ Good aggressive play from both players -- just the sort of thing to cause mistakes -- but Black was too slow in bringing out pieces, so White could make more threats more quickly. A bit of practice spotting threats would do both players some good! } 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 a5 { I'm sure I've suggested to everyone: get your pieces out!} ( 2... Nc6 ) 3. d4 { White ignores the offered pawn in favour of development.} ( 3. Nxe5 { doesn't win a pawn because of} 3... Qe7 4. d4 d6 5. Nf3 Qxe4+ { but} 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Nc3 { is good for White} ) 3... exd4 4. Qxd4 b6 5. Bg5 f6 6. Bh4 g5 7. Bg3 ( 7. Bxg5! { wins a pawn } )7...g4 { Black is trying to win the game with just the pawns... There's something right about this -- any piece attacked by a pawn usually has to move -- but something wrong too: you have to get your pieces out.} 8. Ne5 $5 { Tempting Black to take it.} 8... fxe5 9. Qxe5+ { Forking e8 and h8} 9... Ne7 { Black's first move with a piece! You really have to get your pieces going right from the start.} 10. Qxh8 h6 11. Bc4 Nbc6 12. Qh7 d5 13. Bb3 ( 13. Bxd5 Nxd5 14. Qg6+ Kd7 15. exd5 { wins because of the mate threat on e6} ) 13... a4 14. O-O { Meekly giving up a piece.} ( 14. Bxd5 $1 ) 14... axb3 15. cxb3 { Black is now a piece ahead, but still has to get the pieces out and working.} 15... dxe4 16. Qxe4 Ba6 17. Re1 Qd4 $4 { Again something very right (develop, control the centre, swap Queens, win the endgame) and very wrong.} ( 17... Qd7 $1 ) 18. Qc2 $9 ( 18. Qxc6+ $1 ) 18... Rd8 ( 18... O-O-O { and Black looks good to win} ) 19. Qxc6+ { Spotting it this time!} 19... Qd7 $4 { A natural way of defending, but...} 20. Qg6# 1-0

[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Exeter School"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Watts, Felix"]
[Black "Coleman, Redmond"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C44"]

{ A mixture of good ideas and blunders -- you both know what you should be doing, you just need to do it consistently! } 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 { Petroff's Defence, which counter-attacks e4} 3. d3 { This is too quiet, shutting in the important Bf1.} ( 3. Nxe5 { is the main line} 3... d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 ( 5. d4 ) ) ( 3. d4 { is the move I recommend} ) ( 3. Bc4 { can be an exciting gambit} 3... Nxe4 ( 3... Nc6 { is the Two Knight's Defence} ) 4. d4 exd4 5. Qxd4 { Urusoff's Gambit} ) 3... Nc6 4. Bg5 h6 { Asking the question, did White really want to swap Bishop for Knight?} 5. Bh4 g5 6. Bg3 h5 { Bold, but Black isn't really losing time to develop the pieces, because of the threats.} 7. Nxg5 $2 ( 7. h4 ) 7... h4 $1 { Trapping the Bishop.} 8. Bxe5 Nxe5 9. d4 Nc6 10. Bb5 ( 10. Bc4 { is more likely to cause trouble.} ) 10... Rg8 11. f4 { Both sides are making lots of pawn moves in this game, but there has been a point to all of them.} 11... a6 12. e5 axb5 13. exf6 Qxf6 { Black is a piece up and ahead in development.} 14. O-O Qxd4+ { Swapping Queens makes sense.} 15. Kh1 Qxd1 16. Rxd1 { Now Black should change gear and play the Guaranteed Winning Plan: 1. Develop all the remaining pieces 2. Put them in strong central posistions, and either: 3a. Happily accept swaps to an endgame 3b. Make threats that can't be stopped} 16... f6 17. Re1+ Kd8 $4 ( 17... Be7 { should have been played: the pin is no problem} ) 18. Nh7 $4 ( 18. Nf7# ) 18... d6 ( 18... Bd6 ) 19. c3 $2 { Now that is a pawn move too many.} ( 19. Nc3 { White has to make problems for Black using active pieces.} ) 19... d5 $2 { And again! Black should be using the GWP} ( 19... Bf5 ) 20. Rd1 b4 ( 20... Be6 ) 21. cxb4 Nxb4 { The score runs out about here! After some swaps, White allowed a back rank mate.} 0-1

[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Exeter School"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Coleman, Henry"]
[Black "Hwang, Ethan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C01"]

{ Best game of the night, played slowly and carefully, and either player could have won. } 1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. d4 Nf6 { One piece developed each, both sides can castle in one move's time, and it's White's turn.} 5. Bg5 ( 5. c4 { is a good way to proceed, leading to an open game which is less safe for Black.} ) 5... Be7 6. Bxf6 Bxf6 { One piece developed each, but mysteriously Black can castle straight away.} 7. Nc3 c6 8. Bd3 Bg4 9. h3 Bh5 10. g4 Bg6 11. Bxg6 fxg6 ( 11... hxg6 { castling towards the centre is usually recommended.} ) 12. O-O O-O 13. Re1 Qd6 14. g5 { White is making lots of pawn moves - the problem is not losing time, but making weaknesses, like f4.} 14... Be7 15. Re5 Nd7 16. Re3 Rae8 17. Qe2 a6 { A but vague.} 18. Re1 $1 { Tripled pieces on the e-file tie down Black's pieces.} 18... Rf7 19. Ne5 Nxe5 20. Rxe5 Kf8 { Now the Bishop is defended four times, any one piece can move.} 21. Na4 Qb4 { Seeking counterplay, but it's risky...} 22. Nc5 $1 { Cutting off the Queen from the action, and making some threats.} 22... h5 $2 23. c3 ( 23. Nd7+ { doesn't win [although I thought it did at the time]} 23... Kg8 ) ( 23. Ne6+ $1 Kg8 24. Nc7 Rc8 25. Rxe7 ( 25. Nxd5 cxd5 26. c3 Qd6 27. Rxe7 ) 25... Rxc7 26. Rxc7 Rxc7 27. Qe8+ Kh7 ( 27... Qf8 { unlocks the defences} 28. Qxg6 ) 28. Re6 ) ( 23. gxh6 $3 { first, is even better, loosening up Black's defensive wall} 23... gxh6 24. c3 Qc4 25. Qc2 ) 23... Qb5 24. c4 ( 24. Ne6+ { is still good} 24... Kg8 25. Nc7 Qxe2 26. R1xe2 Rc8 27. Nxd5 { A desperado move} 27... cxd5 28. Rxe7 ) ( 24. Qc2 { is very strong} ) 24... Qxc4 25. Qxc4 dxc4 26. Nxb7 Rb8 { 2.54} 27. Nc5 { Now the position fizzles out.} ( 27. Na5 $1 ) 27... Bxc5 28. Rxc5 ( 28. dxc5 ) 28... Rxb2 29. Rxc6 Re7 ( 29... Rfxf2 $10 ) 30. Rxe7 Kxe7 31. Rxc4 Rxa2 { White should now throw his King into the action.} 32. Rc7+ ( 32. Kg2 ) 32... Ke6 33. Rxg7 Kf5 34. d5 Rd2 35. Rd7 ( 35. Ra7 { That distant passed pawn is dangerous, as we will see...} ) 35... Kxg5 36. d6 Kf6 37. Kg2 Ke6 38. Rg7 ( 38. Rd8 ) 38... Rxd6 39. Rxg6+ Ke7 40. Rg5 Rh6 41. Kg3 Kf7 { Black has a draw in this position, even if we take off Black's pawns.} 42. f4 $4 Rg6 { Once the Rooks come off, the White can is over-stretched.} 43. Kh4 ( 43. h4 ) 43... Rxg5 44. fxg5 Kg6 45. Kg3 a5 46. h4 a4 47. Kh3 a3 48. Kg3 a2 49. Kh3 a1=Q 50. Kg3 Qg1+ 51. Kh3 Kf5 52. g6 Kf4 53. g7 Qh1# 0-1