A French Encounter

[Event "ECC"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.02.12"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Body, Giles"]
[Black "Earnshaw, Terry"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C02"]
[PlyCount "90"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 {The Advance Variation, usually leading to a slow and
mysterious struggle on the wings.} 3... c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 (5... Bd7 {
is my preference.}) (5... Nge7 {and}) (5... Nh6 {are also played.}) 6. Be2 (6.
a3 {John Watson} 6... c4 (6... f6 {John Watson I have suggested this move as a
good weapon in every edition of 'Play the French', and I'm continually
surprised that so few people have used it.} 7. Bd3 fxe5 8. Nxe5 Nf6 9. O-O Bd6
10. Nxc6 10... bxc6 {with a good game, Yilmaz,M-Sutovsky, E/Bursa TUR 2010.})
7. Nbd2 7... Na5 {Grischuk,A-Apicella,M/Bordeaux FRA 2003. (10) In view of the
closed state of the centre Black is more concerned with restraining a b2-b3
breakthrough by White than with rapid development.}) 6... Be7 {
Not very pointed - and almost unknown in this position.} (6... cxd4 $1 7. cxd4
7... Nh6 $1 {John Watson} 8. Nc3 ({Better than} 8. Bxh6 $2 8... Qxb2 {or}) (8.
Na3 Bxa3) ({Also worthy of attention is} 8. Bd3 $5 8... Nf5 9. Bxf5 exf5 10.
O-O {with balanced chances, Harikrishna,P-Meier,G/Merida MEX 2007. (12)
Harikrishna simply castles, whereas Adams in a similar position versus
Vaganian edged his king along the back rank to g1. Evidently the English GM
wanted to keep his rook on h1 to help deter a future g7-g5 break out by Black.
The big question is: can White get away with castling, or can Black burst out
with his kingside pawns?}) 8... Nf5 9. Na4 {White has to adopt some awkward
looking manoeuvres to prevent the loss of the d pawn, but it appears he
emerges with a slight advantage. If} (9. Kf1 9... Ncxd4 $2 10. Na4 $1 {
and White was winning in Minasian,A-Petrosian,D/Batumi GEO 2001}) 9... Qa5+ 10.
Bd2 Bb4 11. Bc3 {
Again this looks odd but in fact it is the only way to hold onto the d pawn.}
11... b5 12. a3 $1 12... Bxc3+ 13. Nxc3 b4 14. axb4 Qxb4 15. Bb5 Bd7 16. Bxc6
Bxc6 17. Qd2 17... Bb5 {getting rid of the bad bishop. Is it equal or has
White kept an edge? See Nunn,J-Schmittdiel,E/Dortmund A 1991. More dynamic for
Black is} (17... O-O {Shirov,A-Ivanchuk,V/Monte Carlo MNC 2005.})) (6... Nh6 $2
7. Bxh6 $1 7... Qxb2 $2 8. Be3 Qxa1 9. Qc2 {
and Black's Queen is stuck. Black must play ...cxd4 first}) 7. a3 {Often playe
d before and without Be2. White usually goes for piece play after Be2, and
follows up with O-O and b3.} 7... c4 $1 {
Else b2-b4 will tie up the Queen's-side.} 8. O-O (8. Nbd2) 8... f6 $5 (8... Bd7
9. Nbd2 9... Na5 {
is a more usual approach, hoping to invade on the Queen's-side holes, e.g.,}
10. Rb1 Nh6 11. b3 $6 11... cxb3 $1 12. Nxb3 12... Ba4 $1 13. Nfd2 Rc8 14. Qc2
Qc7 15. Qb2 Nxb3 16. Nxb3 Qxc3) 9. Nbd2 Na5 (9... fxe5 10. dxe5 10... Bc5 {
is another idea in these positions.}) 10. Rb1 Nh6 11. b4 11... Nc6 $6 {
White seems to have won the Queen's-side argument, but can he make anything
count on the otherwing?} (11... cxb3 $1 12. Nxb3 12... Nf7 $14) 12. Re1 O-O 13.
b5 {Playing on the wrong side, I think.} 13... Na5 14. Qc2 Nf7 15. exf6 15...
Bxf6 {That has changed the terrain completely. Black now has a half-open
f-file but a weak Pe6.} 16. Nf1 Nb3 17. N1d2 Nxc1 18. Rexc1 Bd7 19. Nf1 Qd6 20.
a4 Ng5 21. Rd1 {White's Bishop is supposed to be good!} 21... Rf7 22. Qc1 Nxf3+
(22... Ne4) 23. Bxf3 Raf8 24. Ra1 h6 25. Bh5 Re7 26. Bf3 Bg5 27. Qc2 27... Ref7
{Black is making better use of his advantages than is White. But again, can
anything be made to stick?} 28. Qe2 Bd8 29. Re1 29... Bc7 {
Now I think Black could usefully send the other Bishop around to g6.} 30. Ra2
h5 31. Qe3 h4 32. h3 Rf4 33. Bd1 Qe7 (33... Re4 $1 34. Qd2 Rxe1 35. Qxe1 35...
e5 {frees Black's position, but I don't think it gets any advantage} 36. dxe5
Qxe5 37. Qxe5 Bxe5 38. Rc2 Bf5 39. Rc1 Bf4 40. Ra1) 34. Bg4 Re4 ({
I think the way forward is} 34... e5 $1 35. Bxd7 {(else ...e4)} (35. b6 $1
35... axb6 36. Bxd7 Qxd7 37. dxe5 37... Re4 $1 38. Qd2 38... Qe6 $1) 35... Qxd7
36. dxe5 36... Bb6 $1 {breaks through on f2, with advantage.}) 35. Qd2 Ref4 36.
Qe3 Re4 (36... e5 $1) 37. Qc1 Rxe1 38. Qxe1 Qf6 39. Re2 {
Now White has ganged up on e6, the position swings back the other way.} 39...
Re8 40. Bf3 Rf8 41. Qd2 Rf7 42. Nh2 42... Bxh2+ {
A choice of evils: allow Ng4, or lose the good Bishop.} 43. Kxh2 Re7 44. Qe3
Re8 45. Bg4 Re7 (45... Re7 46. Qe5 {
and White has all the chances in the endgame.}) 1/2-1/2

Chess Quotes

"Always deploy," says Franklin K. Young, "so that the right oblique can be readily established in case the objective plane remains open or becomes permanently located on the centre or on the King's wing, or that the crochet aligned may readily be established if the objective plane becomes permanently located otherwise than at the extremity of the strategic front."

  If this is somewhat obscure (and I see no reason to believe otherwise), the conclusion it reaches is stated in limpid prose by the same writer:

— from Logical Chess by Irving CHERNEV