How not to beat Andrew Greet

An account of our Christmas simul

Genial Cornish giant Andrew Greet came to show us how it was done before Christmas, and I'm sorry it's taken me this long to catch up and do some notes.nbsp; Bob Jones was generous and prompt in his transcription of the games to PGN, so please don't blame him!

Having watched Gary Lane wipe the floor with us a few times, I thought I had a view about how it was done, but clearly personal style has a bearing too: Andrew seemed much less inclined to go for broke and played quite conservatively in the openings, content to go for a solid position with a bit of an edge and wait for us to self-destruct.nbsp; In most cases, he didn't have too long to wait!

It's often thought that top players have a vast depth of opening theory and a capacity for lightning calculation.nbsp; I'm sure they do, but you don't need all that to beat us!nbsp; I guess my game followed established theory for the longest -- 7 moves -- after which Andrew produced a move I hadn't seen before, but which has been seen recently among the elite.nbsp; And as for calculation, there were rather few tactics around, and Andrew generally let them go -- except against Keith, when perhaps he wished he hadn't!nbsp; Keith made a determined effort to attack Andrew's King, but it was White's centralised and active pieces who were best able to make use of the newly opened lines and spaces, a story that was repeated in my game.nbsp; Other common faults by the home team were making unnecessary concessions (Richard, Sean, Robin) and in particular making up new unsound moves in the opening (Brian, Bob) -- there's really no need to do this, and I expect if you wanted to play a main line of theory (like Simon) then Andrew would be the first to dodge.nbsp; Freddie perhaps did best for longest, although Richard was last to finish.

Click on [...] to see games list.


[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Exeter Club"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Aldwin, Brian"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D02"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[BlackElo "100"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{The moral of this game was: Don't Make It Up As You Go Along} 1. d4 1... Nf6
2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 {
This is a very standard position and Black has a number of trusted replies.}
3... Bf5 $2 {Just loses a Pawn.  There are lots of moves that are well-known
in  this position, and it's not hard to learn one.  So, unless you know
something better, adopt a set safe formation like   ...d5/...e6/...Nf6/...Be7/.
..O-O/...b6 or   ...d5/...e6/...c5/...Nc6/...Nf6/...Be7.  As Brian plays the
Stonewall as White, it wouldn't be a stretch to play the Stonewall Dutch as
Black.} (3... e6) (3... c6) (3... dxc4) 4. cxd5 Nbd7 5. Nc3 e6 (5... Nb6 {
is the way to try and get the Pawn back but} 6. e4 $1 6... Nxe4 7. Bb5+ Nd7 8.
Nxe4 Bxe4 9. Ne5 {gives black a headache e.g.} 9... Bf5 $6 (9... c6 10. dxc6
bxc6 11. Bxc6 Bxc6 12. Nxc6 Qc7) 10. Qf3) 6. dxe6 Bxe6 7. e4 Bb4 8. Bd3 Bg4 9.
O-O O-O 10. Bg5 (10. e5 $1) 10... Be7 11. h3 Bh5 12. e5 $1 12... Ne8 13. Bxe7
Qxe7 14. Nd5 14... Qd8 {Black is a pawn down but is also getting squashed.} 15.
Nf4 Bg6 16. Nxg6 ({
An example of the sort of combination Andrew failed to show any interest in:} 
16. Bxg6 $1 16... hxg6 17. e6 $1 17... Nb6 18. Ne5 $1 $18) 16... fxg6 $2 {
Capturing away from the centre is rarely correct, but there are two particular
reasons for being suspicious of this one: positionally, it leaves White's
e-pawn unobstructed, and tactically, it allows a fork on b3.} 17. Be4 {
Playing this before the Q check, further weakens Black's Q-side pawns.[R. H.
Jones]} 17... c6 18. Qb3+ Kh8 19. Qxb7 Nb6 20. Rad1 (20. Rac1) 20... Qc8 21.
Qxc6 Qxc6 22. Bxc6 {Leaving Black 3 pawns down, and White's central pair
extremely menacing. [R. H. Jones]} 22... Rc8 23. d5 Nc7 24. Rfe1 Ncxd5 25. Bxd5
Rfe8 26. Bf7 Re7 27. e6 h5 28. Ne5 Kh7 29. Nxg6 Rxf7 30. exf7 {
resigned, in view of} 30... Kxg6 31. Re7 Rf8 32. Rd6+ Kh7 33. Rc6 {etc.} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Atkins, K."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A81"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[BlackElo "145"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "46"]
[SourceDate "2009.12.23"]

{The Moral of this Game is: Think twice before letting a pawn go for a dream
of an attack... and at other times.} 1. d4 1... f5 2. g3 {"The Dutch Indian
Variation."  [says R. H. Jones, although I use that term to refer to Steinitz'
line with ...e6 and ...Bb4+]} 2... Nf6 3. Bg2 d6 4. c4 g6 5. Nc3 5... Bg7 {
The Leningrad Dutch: complex and flexible and for me at least impenetrable.} 6.
Nh3 {A classic piece of IM subtlety; the Knight is headed for f4 to put
pressure on the weak e6 square.} 6... Nc6 7. d5 7... Ne5 {
Black is exchanging weaknesses for dynamism.} 8. Nf4 O-O 9. Qb3 Rb8 10. O-O Bd7
11. Re1 a6 12. Be3 12... g5 {ignoring the threat of Ba7 and exposing another
pawn to attack. bravely advancing his protective pawn shield.} (12... c5 {
looks obligatory}) 13. Nd3 Nxd3 14. exd3 h6 (14... e5 15. dxe6 Bxe6 16. Bxg5)
15. Bd4 (15. Ba7 {wins a pawn but Andrew wants to keep control of the position
-- you know, in case of accidents.}) 15... Qe8 16. Re2 16... Qh5 {Black serenel
y lets a pawn go in order to build up on the King's-side. However, it's going
to take a few more moves before Black has any real threats.} 17. Rxe7 Rbd8 18.
Qxb7 {Two pawns...} 18... f4 19. Qxc7 {Three...   "They're like peanuts, you
know. " -- Stephan Gerzadowicz.  White has been allowed to invade the Black
position and Fritz reckons Black can resign. Black has been announcing his
intention to attack White's King for a while now, but Black's King is about to
be involved in a fight that he wants no part of.} 19... fxg3 20. fxg3 {
Black is faced with direct threats that must be defended.} 20... Rde8 $2 {
# White has two tactical blows here, both of which work. [DR] White spots a
neat plan to snaffle both bishops at the cost of a rook.[R. H.Jones]} 21. Rxg7+
$1 (21. Qxd7 $1 21... Nxd7 (21... Rxe7 22. Qxe7 $18) 22. Rxg7+ Kh8 23. Rxg5+
$18 {and Black can resign.}) 21... Kxg7 22. Qxd7+ 22... Kg8 {# They often say,
in order to avoid blunders, take a fresh look at the board -- and a walk
around the room should have allowed Andrew exactly that! [DR] Materially,
White now has a pair of bishops and two pawns for a rook, other things being
equal, and is well set for a win - except that he forgets Black's knight is no
longer pinned.[R. H. Jones]} 23. Rf1 $4 23... Nxd7 0-1

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Boyne, A. K."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B01"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "84"]

{The Moral of this Game is: Kings are Stronger than Knights.} 1. e4 1... d5 2.
exd5 Qxd5 3. Nf3 Bg4 (3... e5 {is a possible problem with White's move-order.})
4. Be2 4... e5 {Fair enough.} 5. Nc3 Qa5 6. O-O Nd7 7. d4 Bxf3 8. Bxf3 8...
O-O-O {
Black seems to have equalised without effort; the two Bishops don't look scary.
} 9. Be3 Ngf6 10. Qe2 exd4 11. Bxd4 Bc5 12. Rad1 Bxd4 13. Rxd4 Ne5 14. Rfd1 (
14. Bxb7+ Kxb7 15. b4 Qb6 16. Rxd8 Rxd8 17. Qxe5 17... Qxb4 {is exactly the
sort of messy position the simul-giver wants to avoid, although on calm
reflection this is rather good for White.}) 14... Rxd4 15. Rxd4 Re8 16. Rd1 Qc5
(16... Qb4 $1 {and Black even has a little initiative}) 17. Be4 Nc6 18. Qd3 g6
19. Bxc6 (19. Na4 $5 {is awkward to meet: it seems Black must concede some
variety of pawn weakness but there's not a lot in it}) 19... Qxc6 20. h3 Qe6
21. a4 (21. Qd4 $1) 21... Qe7 22. Kf1 {Over-cautious, I think: White could risk
} (22. Qd4 $5) 22... Rd8 23. Qxd8+ Qxd8 24. Rxd8+ 24... Kxd8 {
This is simply equal, but...} 25. Ke2 Kd7 26. Kd3 c6 27. Kd4 Kd6 28. b4 Nd5 29.
Ne4+ Ke7 30. b5 Nf4 31. bxc6 bxc6 32. Kc5 {
and Black is dropping a pawn... although White is losing one on g2.} 32... f5
33. Ng5 33... Kd7 $2 {Now White saves his pawn and goes ahead.} (33... Nxg2 $1
34. Nxh7 (34. Kxc6 h6 35. Nf3 Nf4 36. h4 Nh3 37. Ne5 g5 38. hxg5 hxg5 39. Nd3 {
is no picnic for White}) 34... Nf4 35. Ng5 35... Kd7 {
and White has it all to prove}) 34. g3 Nd5 35. Nxh7 Kc7 36. h4 (36. Nf8 $1)
36... Nc3 $1 {With threats on a4 and e4.} 37. Kd4 {Changing direction} 37...
Ne4 (37... Nxa4 {must be the test of it, but it's a long way back to catch the
h-pawn. Knight endings are all about passed Rook's pawns! In the game Black
goes for winning the a-pawn with the King, and defending the King's-side with
the Knight, which is slower... Knights are faster than Kings but Kings are the
stronger piece.[DR]}) ({
Black can take the a-pawn, but it leaves his 2 kingside pawn vulnerable.} 37...
Nxa4 38. Nf8 Kd6 39. Nxg6 c5+ 40. Kc4 Nb6+ 41. Kb5 Nd5 42. h5 Nf6 43. h6 Ke6
44. Nh4 Kf7 45. f3 f4 46. gxf4 Nh5 47. Kxc5 Nxf4 48. c4 {
and White's 3-1 pawn majority should be enough to force a win. [R. H. Jones]})
38. Ke3 Kb6 39. Nf8 Ka5 40. Nxg6 Kxa4 41. Ne7 Kb5 42. Nxf5 42... a5 {The h-pawn
will cost a Knight, and maybe the a-pawn will get one back, but the remaining
King's-side pawns are monsters.} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A.."]
[Black "Cubbon, R.."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E00"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[BlackElo "100"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "35"]

{
The Moral of this Game is: Don't force your opponent to carry out their threat!
} 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. g3 c5 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg2 {
The Tarrasch Defence.} 6... Be6 7. Nc3 Bd6 8. dxc5 Bxc5 9. O-O Nc6 10. Bg5
10... h6 $2 {Just forces White to carry out his threat.} (10... Be7 $1) (10...
Rc8 $5 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nxd5 Qxb2) 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nxd5 Qd8 (12... Qxb2 $2
13. Nc7+) 13. Nf4 Qe7 14. Nxe6 Qxe6 15. e3 O-O 16. a3 Rad8 17. Qa4 {
It's a long way from the win, but White is a clear pawn up with no problems.}
17... a5 18. Qc2 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Jones, R. H."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C10"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[BlackElo "140"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "42"]

{The Moral of This Game is Also: Don't Make It Up as You Go Along.} 1. e4 1...
e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 3... c5 $6 {A risky move tried by Frank Marshall.  ....c5
is a very common blow in the French, but usually only after White has closed
the centre with e4-e5. or played a passive move like Nd2.  Here, White is
well-placed to make use of the new opportunities.} 4. exd5 cxd4 (4... exd5 5.
dxc5 5... d4 {was Frank's idea.}) 5. Qxd4 Nf6 6. Bb5+ Nc6 7. Nf3 Bd7 8. Bxc6
bxc6 9. dxe6 9... Bxe6 {White is a pawn up with no problems.} 10. Bg5 Be7 11.
O-O-O Qc7 12. Rhe1 O-O 13. Qf4 Qb7 14. Nd4 14... Rfb8 {
Black has to try this; normal play will result in swaps and a lost endgame.}
15. b3 Ba3+ 16. Kb1 Nd5 17. Nxd5 Bxd5 18. Nf5 a5 19. Bf6 $1 19... a4 {
My computer got very excited here, running about wagging its tail and barking..
.} (19... gxf6 20. Qg3+ Kf8 21. Qg7#) 20. Qg5 ({
White can finish off neatly with} 20. Nh6+ $1 20... Kf8 21. Bxg7+ Kxg7 22. Qg5+
Kf8 (22... Kh8 23. Qf6#) 23. Qg8# {Andrew was consistently uninterested in
these forcing continuations, just in case there was some point that he
overlooked.}) 20... g6 21. Rxd5 $1 {The best move, but I don't know what
Andrew had seen. If the game lasted until move 37, then not enough!} (21. Nh6+
Kf8 22. Qe5 22... Be6 {allows Black to stumble on...}) 21... cxd5 (21... cxd5
22. Nh6+ $1 (22. Qh6 Bf8) 22... Kf8 23. Qe5 {
is mate in a few: Black can throw material at White if he wants.} 23... Qe7 24.
Bxe7+ Ke8 25. Qc7 $1) (21... axb3 $5 {keeps the pot boiling}) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Pope, S."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B19"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "61"]

{The Moral of This Game is: It's easy to slide from Passive to Lost.} 1. e4
1... c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 (5. Ng5 {
White more usually tries to force Black into sharper play with}) 5... Bg6 6. h4
h6 7. Nf3 Nd7 8. h5 Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 {This long main line of the
Caro-Kann has not been played so much in recent years.  As usual, Sean
declines to go for the throat, and prefers to unwind slowly but surely.} 10...
Ngf6 11. Bf4 Qa5+ 12. Bd2 Qc7 13. O-O-O e6 14. Ne4 O-O-O 15. g3 Nxe4 16. Qxe4
Bd6 17. Kb1 Nf6 18. Qe2 18... c5 {With this counterblow I think Black can
claim to have equalised. It's interesting to see how Andrew sets about gaining
the advantage from here.} 19. c4 cxd4 20. Nxd4 a6 21. Bc3 Rhg8 22. f4 Kb8 23.
Nf3 23... Ka8 {Black is solid but White's pieces are gaining activity.} 24. Ne5
24... Bxe5 {Black gives up his Bishop, leaving White's Bishop dominating.} (
24... Rgf8 {holds without making any concessions.}) 25. Bxe5 Qe7 26. g4 {
White pursues an initiative based on that great Bishop.} 26... Nd7 27. Bc3 (27.
Bd6 Qe8 28. Rd2) 27... f6 $6 {This is quite a concession; White immediately
adds pressure to the weakened e-pawn.} 28. Rhe1 Rge8 29. Qf2 e5 30. Rd5 {
White now has the extra option of Red1.} 30... Nb6 $4 {
That's a shame, but it's hard to offer Black constructive advice.} (30... Kb8
31. Red1) (30... Rc8 31. Red1 Nc5 32. fxe5) 31. Qxb6 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Waters, S."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C42"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "102"]

{The Moral of this Game is: If You Want to Beat an IM, You Must Be Accurate!} 
1. e4 1... e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nc4 {A mysterious system, no better
than the main line but there's no need to invite Simon to show off how much of
the theory he knows.} 4... Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Ne3 {
White might claim that the Knight is better placed on e3 than f3.} 6... Be6 7.
c4 Bb4+ 8. Nd2 O-O (8... dxc4) 9. Be2 c6 10. cxd5 Bxd5 11. O-O Nxd2 12. Bxd2
Bxd2 13. Qxd2 13... Be6 {White has an uninspiring IQP position.} 14. Bf3 Na6
15. Rfd1 Nc7 16. Qa5 Nd5 17. Qxd8 Raxd8 18. a3 18... Rfe8 {This is a bit
better for Black, but it's a big ask to make it a win. White sets to work to
create a black weakness on the Queen's-side.} 19. Rac1 Kf8 20. Kf1 20... g6 {
Not precise. Black needs to put pressure on the White game to stop him
creating counterplay.} (20... Rd6 $1 21. Rc5 Red8) 21. Rc5 {
Three exchanges on d5 will leave a black pawn on d5} 21... Nxe3+ ({
I think Black's best is} 21... Nc7 {followed by doubling on the d-file.}) 22.
fxe3 {This structure and this set of pieces is not bad for White.} 22... Bd5
23. Kf2 Be4 (23... f5) 24. b4 a6 25. a4 f5 26. Rdc1 Bxf3 27. Kxf3 Re7 28. b5 {
White has no problems any more; Black is drifting into a passive if solid
position.} 28... axb5 29. axb5 Rde8 30. R1c3 cxb5 31. Rxb5 Rd8 32. h3 Rdd7 33.
g4 {White secures two connected passed pawns.} 33... fxg4+ 34. hxg4 Kg7 35. Rc4
(35. g5) 35... Rf7+ 36. Ke2 36... Rfe7 {White is more active but there's not
so much to go wrong here for Black.   White is going to try and organise e3-e4
without allowing a Rook behind his lines.} 37. Kd3 Rf7 38. Rcb4 Kh6 39. Rb1 Kg7
40. g5 h6 41. gxh6+ Kxh6 42. Rh1+ Kg7 43. Rh3 Rf6 44. e4 {
Made it!  But there's a way to go yet...} 44... Ra6 45. Rb3 Ra1 46. d5 Rc7 47.
Rg3 (47. e5 $5 {must be the best way to try and win.}) 47... Rd1+ 48. Ke3 Re7
49. Rb4 $2 {Not terrible but allows a simplification.} 49... Rxd5 50. Rxb7 Rde5
51. Rxe7+ 51... Rxe7 {Draw agreed} 1/2-1/2

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Sugden, F."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E68"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[BlackElo "114"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "77"]

{The Moral of this Game is: Thirty Good Moves Can Be Spoiled By One Bad One} 1.
d4 1... Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. O-O d6 6. c4 Nbd7 (6... Nc6 {
is more combative}) 7. Nc3 Re8 8. e4 e5 9. Re1 a5 10. h3 h6 11. Be3 Nh7 (11...
exd4 {is the usual way to handle this position.} 12. Nxd4 Nc5 13. Qc2 Bd7) 12.
Qd2 {Putting his finger on the weak point of Black's last move.} 12... Nb6 13.
b3 Qf6 14. dxe5 (14. Nb5 $1 {is good enough for a pawn and a plus.}) 14... dxe5
15. Nd5 Nxd5 16. cxd5 16... Bf8 {Using the new paths on the dark squares.} (
16... Bxh3 17. Bxh6) 17. Rec1 Bb4 18. Qd1 (18. Qe2) 18... Bd6 19. Nd2 Ng5 20.
Kh2 Bd7 21. h4 Nh7 22. Nc4 (22. Bxh6 {Doesn't win a pawn, but looks fine;
again, it's not a move a simul-giver is going to fancy, you aim to keep it
under control, and not let your opponent have any fun.} 22... Qxf2 23. Nc4 Nf6
24. Be3 Ng4+) 22... a4 23. Bxh6 {Oh well, couldn't resist!} 23... axb3 24. Be3
$6 {Solid but not best.} (24. Qxb3) (24. Nxd6) 24... bxa2 $1 {
That pawn got a long way in a short time!} 25. Qb3 25... g5 {
Right, when you're opponent is busy elsewhere, make hay on the King's-side!}
26. hxg5 Nxg5 27. Bxg5 Qxg5 28. Nxd6 Qh6+ 29. Kg1 29... Qxd6 {
Black looks in decent shape.} 30. Rxa2 Rxa2 31. Qxa2 31... Kg7 {
Not urgent enough.} 32. Qb2 {White is starting to get some pressure.} (32. Qa7
$1) (32. Qc2) 32... Qb6 $2 {This exchange is obviously bad for Black, getting
weak doubled pawns in exchange for allowing White's Rook into the defences!} (
32... Rb8) 33. Qxb6 cxb6 34. Rc7 Bc8 35. Bf1 Bg4 36. Kg2 {Playing safe.} (36.
Rxb7 $1 36... Bf3 37. Bg2 {and White will go two pawns up.}) 36... Rc8 37. Rxc8
(37. Rxb7 {is now not so good:} 37... Rc3 38. Rxb6 Bf3+ 39. Kh3 Bxe4 40. d6)
37... Bxc8 38. Bb5 Kf6 39. f4 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2009.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Scholes, R."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C41"]
[WhiteElo "221"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "31"]

{The Moral of this Game is: Improving at Chess Is More About Avoiding Bad
Moves That You Know You Shouldn't Make, than Learning Great New Ideas.} 1. e4
1... e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 5... Be7 {
This is a solid but passive way of playing the Philidor Defence.} 6. g3 O-O 7.
Bg2 7... c5 {This creates a big hole on d5. I expect Richard knows this! But
perhaps already there is dicomfort because Black's position is pretty
uninspiring. Actually, c5 is not uncommon in Philidor positions, but you play
it when you are getting something very positive in return, like the chance to
play ...Bc6 and ...Re8 with pressure on e4.} 8. Nde2 Nc6 9. O-O a6 10. h3 10...
Qd7 {Illogical: where is the Bc8 going?} 11. Nf4 b6 12. Ncd5 Nxd5 13. Nxd5 Bd8
14. Bf4 Ne5 15. Bxe5 dxe5 16. a4 {The Black Bd8 is likely to be poor for a
while. White has a plus: he is likely to pick up Bishop for Knight, but
White's own Bishop is not very good ... (1-0, 60)} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2008.12.22"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greet, A."]
[Black "Regis, D."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C11"]
[Annotator "DR"]
[PlyCount "65"]
[EventDate "2008.10.05"]

{The Moral of this Game Is: Don't Open Up the Game when you are Behind in
Development} 1. e4 1... e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6
7. Be3 a6 8. Ne2 {Hmm, new to me...} 8... b5 (8... Qb6 {
Ryznar,V-Furlan,M/13th Open 1999/0-1 (41)}) (8... Be7 {
Cheparinov,I-Topalov,V/4th M-Tel Masters 2008/0-1 (38)}) (8... cxd4 {
Svidler,P-Korchnoi,V/38th Olympiad 2008/ - (56)}) 9. g3 (9. c3 {
0-1 Zaper,M-Knezovic,I/Goodbye Summer Open 2005 (36)}) 9... Qb6 (9... b4 {
0-1 Socko,B-Drozdovskij,Y/1st WMSG Rapid Ind 2008 (35)}) 10. Bg2 10... f6 {
Possibly inaccurate.} 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. c3 b4 13. Ne5 bxc3 14. bxc3 cxd4 (14...
Bd6 $2 15. dxc5 Bxc5 16. Rb1) 15. Nxd4 Nxe5 (15... Qb2 16. Ndxc6 Qxg2) 16. fxe5
16... Nd7 {All this is strategically very proper for Black -- he can point to
weak pawns on c3 and e5 -- but that won't matter if he gets mated because he
hasn't castled!} 17. O-O Nxe5 18. Qh5+ Ng6 19. Rab1 Qc7 20. Rbe1 Bd6 21. Nf5
21... O-O {Whew...  I've just been looking at McDonald's primer on playing the
French against 1.e4, where he warns that White won't mind the centre being
blown up if White's pieces are in a position to take advantage of the new open
lines, and this game is a good example of that.} 22. Nxd6 Qxd6 (22... Rxf1+ 23.
Rxf1 Qxd6 24. c4 Bb7) 23. Rxf8+ Qxf8 (23... Nxf8 $1 24. c4 24... Bb7 {
and Black is still under a lot of pressure, but he can cuddle his extra pawn
for comfort.}) 24. c4 Bb7 25. cxd5 Bxd5 26. Bxd5 exd5 27. Qxd5+ 27... Kh8 {
Material is equal and pawns are symmetrical, but White's active pieces
dominate the show.} 28. Rf1 Qe8 (28... Qg8 29. Qb7 Re8 30. Bd4) 29. Bc1 Rb8 30.
Qd6 Qd8 ({I chickened out of} 30... Rc8 $1 {with the idea} 31. Qxa6 Rxc1 32.
Rxc1 32... Qe3+ {Andrew was coming around pretty fast now!}) 31. Rd1 Qxd6 (
31... Qc8) 32. Rxd6 Kg8 33. Kf2 {and Black failed to hold the endgame...} 1-0

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