How Not to Beat Jack Rudd

Local International Master Jack Rudd, known as the fastest pawn in the West, visited us recently to give a simul.nbsp; In characteristically quick time he defeated all challengers with a score of 13-0, leaving most wondering what had hit them and a few mournfully looking for crumbs of comfort in a post mortem dissection.

Jack gave us a demonstration of how many different ways to win a chess game: being alert to tactics (Simon, Sean), positional grinds (Tim), lordly attacks (Sean) or simply taking advantage of elementary mistakes (Brian, Richard) with a bit of endgame technique (Richard, Tim).

Both Simon and Tim probably had a draw in hand with more accurate play.nbsp; Looking a little deeper at the games you can see how he often took his chances (Simon, Sean) while we let some go (Jonathan). Jack was also content to pick up small advantages as he went along (Tim) without searching always for the very sharpest move.nbsp; Interestingly, he used a greater range of opening moves than I've seen used in a simul.; Fischer and Spassky would open 1.e4 on every board!

Here are some of the games with notes by DrDave and Fritz.nbsp; Fritz is typically cryptic in some of its suggestions and assessments, so I haven't tried to interpret them all.nbsp; They're all worth a look, if only to decide for yourself why they're wrong!

Click on [...] to see games list.


[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Daniel Frean"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E56"]
[WhiteElo "2357"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{A promising start but Black soon lost his balance, conceding in rapid
succession a passed pawn and the d-file.} 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. d4 Bb4 4. e3
O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O Nc6 8. a3 cxd4 (8... Ba5 $5) (8... dxc4 9. Bxc4
9... cxd4 {is the right move order; instead of getting a big useful pawn mass
on the Queen's-side, axb4 results in weaknesses.}) (8... Bxc3 {is the Big Main
Line of the Nimzo. There are a couple of alternatives besides Dan's move:}) 9.
axb4 dxc3 10. bxc3 10... e5 $16 {This pawn can be undermined immediately.} (
10... Qc7 $5 $11 {is Fritz' suggestion.}) 11. b5 $14 ({Fritz suggests} 11. cxd5
11... Qxd5 12. e4 12... Qd6 $16) 11... dxc4 $16 (11... e4 $5 12. bxc6 exd3 13.
cxb7 Bxb7 14. Qxd3 dxc4 15. Qxc4 15... Re8 $14) 12. Bxc4 {White has all the
advantages that are going, mostly seen in the initiative. In order not to lose
the e-pawn, Black has to submit to an unfavourable sequence.} (12. bxc6 $143
12... cxd3 13. Nxe5 13... Qd5 $11) 12... e4 13. bxc6 13... Qxd1 $2 $18 {
Conceding the d-file doesn't help.} (13... exf3 $142 14. Qxf3 14... Qc7 $16)
14. Rxd1 exf3 15. Ba3 $1 (15. gxf3 $6 15... bxc6 16. Rd6 16... a5 $16) 15...
Re8 16. c7 $16 (16. Bb5 $5 $142 16... a6 17. Bb4 axb5 18. Rxa8 bxc6 19. Ba5 $18
) 16... Bg4 $18 {I like the attitude, but it doesn't help.} (16... Be6 $5 17.
Bxe6 fxe6 18. gxf3 18... Rec8 $16) 17. h3 $16 (17. Rdb1 $5 17... b6 18. gxf3
18... Be6 $18) 17... Bh5 $2 $18 (17... Be6 $142 18. Bxe6 fxe6 19. gxf3 19...
Rec8 $16) 18. g4 18... Bg6 {
Now the Bishop is cut off from the action on the Queen's-side.} 19. Bc5 (19.
Be7 $1 $142 19... Rac8 20. Bb5 Rxc7 21. Bxf6 $18) 19... Ne4 $2 (19... Rac8 $142
20. Bb5 Rxc7 21. Bxe8 21... Nxe8 $18) 20. Rxa7 $1 ({
Fritz suggests the unlikely move} 20. Be7 $1 {
but I can't see many humans going for that one.}) 20... Rac8 (20... Nxc5 $2 21.
Rxa8 $1 {wins. Not hard, but characteristic of Jack's tactical alertness.}) 21.
Bb6 Nxc3 22. Rd8 Be4 23. Kh2 (23. Ra3 $5 23... Ne2+ 24. Kh2 24... h5 $18) 23...
Bc6 (23... h5 24. Ra3 Rcxd8 25. cxd8=R (25. cxd8=B $6 25... Nb1 26. Ra5 26...
Nd2 $18) (25. cxd8=N $143 25... Nd5 $18) 25... Rxd8 26. Bxd8 $18 (26. Rxc3 $6
26... Rd2 $18)) 24. Ra3 (24. Ra5 $142 24... Ne4 $18) 24... Ne4 (24... Na4 25.
Ba5 25... Nc5 $18) 25. Rad3 {Now White can capture on c8, winning.} (25. Rad3
Rxc7 26. Rxe8+ Bxe8 27. Bxc7 $18) (25. Rxc8 $142 25... Rxc8 26. Rd3 $18) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Richard Scholes"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A09"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "101"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{Another good start.  Jack bullies a pawn out of his opponent who almost
invites forward his dangerous pawns.} 1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 d4 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 Nf6
5. O-O e5 6. d3 h6 7. e3 $15 {Fritz likes Black's extra space.} (7. a3 7... a5
$11) 7... Bc5 $11 {
The Bishop does defend the centre but it doesn't have a future here.} (7... Be7
8. a3 $15) 8. exd4 {White fights for the Initiative} 8... exd4 9. Re1+ Be6 10.
Ne5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 Bd6 12. Rb5 {
Sprightly! I imagine most club players would hold the e-file.} 12... Rb8 $14 ({
Fritz suggests the exchange sac} 12... b6 13. Bc6+ (13. Bxa8 Qxa8) 13... Bd7
14. Bxa8 Qxa8 15. Qe2+ Kd8 16. Nd2 $11) 13. Rxb7 ({
White can offer the exchange with} 13. Bxb7 $143 13... Bd7 14. Bg2 Bxb5 15.
cxb5 15... O-O $15) 13... Rxb7 14. Bxb7 O-O 15. Nd2 15... Bc5 $16 (15... Qe7 $5
$11 {And Fritz reckons that Black has some compensation.}) 16. Ne4 16... Bb6
$16 {Asking for trouble. One of the easiest ways to get a bad game is to give
your opponent a simple plan to follow!} (16... Qe7 17. Nxf6+ Qxf6 18. a3 $16)
17. b4 {White prepares c5} 17... a5 $18 (17... Nxe4 $5 18. Bxe4 c5 19. bxc5
19... Bxc5 $16) 18. c5 Ba7 19. a3 $16 (19. Qa4 $5 19... Ng4 20. Qxa5 20... Bb8
$18) 19... axb4 $18 (19... Ng4 $5 $16) 20. axb4 {White is in control, a pawn
ahead with the better position. Jack now switches to swap-off gear.} 20... Bb8
21. Nxf6+ Qxf6 22. Qf3 22... Qe7 {
Richard declines the swap, but of course allows the white Queen a good post.}
23. Bb2 (23. Bd2 23... Qe8 $18) 23... Rd8 24. Re1 Qd7 (24... Qg5 25. Qd1 Qg6
26. Be4 $18) 25. Bc6 Qc8 (25... Bg4 26. Qe4 Qe6 27. f3 $18) 26. b5 (26. Re4 Qa6
27. Rxd4 27... Rf8 $18) 26... Bg4 27. Qf4 Qf5 28. Qxf5 (28. Bxd4 $5 28... Qxf4
29. gxf4 29... Kf8 $18) 28... Bxf5 29. Re8+ Rxe8 30. Bxe8 Bxd3 31. Bxd4 Ba7 (
31... Be4 32. Bd7 $18) 32. b6 cxb6 33. c6 $1 {
The passed pawn on c6 quickly leads to threats} (33. cxb6 $5 $142 33... Bb8 $18
{is still good, but Jack can more easily fight for control of c7/c8 than b8.})
33... Ba6 (33... Bb8 34. Bxb6 Kf8 35. Bd7 $18) 34. Bd7 34... Bb5 $1 35. f4 $16
(35. Be5 $5 35... g6 $18) 35... Kf8 36. f5 f6 37. Bc3 Ke7 38. Bb4+ 38... Kf7 $2
$18 (38... Kd8 $16 $142) 39. Be6+ Ke8 40. c7 $1 {Winning.} 40... Bd7 41. c8=Q+
(41. g4 b5+ 42. Kg2 Bc6+ 43. Kg3 43... Bb7 $18) 41... Bxc8 42. Bxc8 Kf7 (42...
Bb8 43. Kf2 $18) 43. Kg2 Bb8 (43... g6 44. Bd2 $18) 44. Be6+ Ke8 45. Kf3 (45.
Kh3 $5 45... Be5 $18) 45... Be5 (45... h5 $18) 46. Kg4 Bd4 47. Kh5 Bc5 (47...
Bg1 48. h3 48... Bd4 $18) 48. Bxc5 $1 48... bxc5 49. Kg6 Kf8 50. g4 c4 51. Bxc4
({Fritz helpfully offers:} 51. Bxc4 51... Ke7 52. Kxg7 Kd7 53. Kxf6 Kc7 54. Kg7
Kd6 55. f6 Ke5 56. f7 h5 57. gxh5 Kd4 58. f8=Q Kxc4 59. h6 Kb3 60. h7 Kc3 61.
Qf4 Kd3 62. h8=Q Kc2 63. Qc8+ Kd1 64. Qf3+ Ke1 65. Qcc3# {
Thanks, Fritz, I couldn't have worked that out for myself.}) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Brian Aldwin"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A30"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "43"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{Some odd opening play left Black with problems getting sorted, and White
picked up a pawn while he was trying to do so.} 1. c4 1... c5 $11 (1... e5 $5
$15) 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. Nc3 4... e5 $14 {
Giving White something to aim at already.} (4... e6 5. Nf3 $11) 5. e3 5... Ne7
$16 {Hard to understand. Black will spend the best of the game behind in
development and lacking active play.} (5... d5 $5 6. cxd5 6... Nb4 $14) 6. Nf3
d6 7. d4 cxd4 8. exd4 8... Bg4 $2 $18 {Drops a pawn fairly simply.} (8... Nc6
$5 9. dxe5 9... Nxe5 $16) 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Qxd8+ Rxd8 11. Nxe5 11... b6 $2 (
11... Nc6 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. Bxc6+ 13... Bd7 $18) 12. Bg5 (12. Nxg4 $6 12...
Nxg4 13. Bf4 g5 14. Bxg5 14... Bg7 $18) 12... Bd7 13. Nb5 (13. O-O-O $142 13...
a6 14. Bb7 $18) 13... Bxb5 14. cxb5 {White's extra pawn is devalued, but to be
honest White's extra activity might be worth a pawn.} 14... Nfd5 (14... h6 15.
Bd2 h5 16. Nc6 $18) 15. O-O-O (15. Nc6 15... Rd7 $18) 15... f6 $1 {Not sure if
Jack had seen that one; it's not the sort of move you allow casually. White is
still in full control though.} 16. Nc6 Nxc6 17. bxc6 (17. Rxd5 17... Rxd5 $1
18. Bxd5 Ne7 19. Bxf6 19... Nxd5 $17) (17. Bxd5 $6 17... Ne7 18. Bf7+ Kxf7 19.
Rxd8 19... fxg5 $14) 17... fxg5 18. Bxd5 (18. Rxd5 $6 18... Rxd5 19. Bxd5 19...
Kd8 $16) 18... Bd6 $2 (18... Rd6 $18) 19. Rhe1+ Kf8 20. Bb3 Bc7 (20... h5 21.
Rd5 Rh6 22. Red1 $18 (22. Rxg5 $6 22... Be7 23. Rf5+ Rf6 24. Rxf6+ 24... Bxf6
$18)) 21. Rd7 (21. Rxd8+ $142 21... Bxd8 22. Rd1 22... Ke8 $18) 21... Rxd7 22.
cxd7 {Jack asked, why did you resign? Black's position is grim but White needs
to show a winning plan (getting the King involved should produce something).} (
22. cxd7 g6 23. Re8+ Kg7 24. f3 $18) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Tim Paulden"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B40"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "81"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{A useful opening novelty left Jack without anything to show in the opening,
although he soon could count the Bishop pair and a Queen's-side majority in
his hand.  Black had it all to do in the ensuing endgame and couldn't quite
hold it together.} 1. d4 e6 2. e4 c5 3. Nf3 cxd4 4. Nxd4 4... d5 $16 {
Unusual: NCO denies all knowledge. White can probably get an advantage by
being pushy, but Jack is content with normal moves and a normal White plus +=.}
(4... Nf6 $5 $14 $142) 5. exd5 $14 (5. Bb5+ $5 {Insisting on the IQP.} 5... Bd7
6. exd5 $16 (6. exd5 exd5 7. O-O Nf6 8. Re1+ Be7 9. Nf5 Bxb5 10. Nxe7 Kf8 11.
b3 Nc6 12. Ba3 12... Nxe7 {
Felgaer,R-Calderon Fernandez,G/1st Chesspangenberg Open 2003/1-0 (27)})) (5.
Bd3 Nc6 6. c3 Qb6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Nd2 Nxd4 9. cxd4 Qxd4 10. Nf3 Qc5 11. e5 11...
Nd7 {Kuveljic,B-Jovic,B/Spring Open 2007/1-0 (23)}) 5... Qxd5 (5... exd5 {
looks like a French Tarrasch:} 6. Nc3 (6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. Qe2+ Be7 8. O-O (8. Nf5))
6... Bb4 7. Bb5+ Bd7 8. O-O Ne7 9. Qe2 O-O 10. Bg5 Re8 11. Rad1 Nbc6 12. Qh5 {
Riviere,F-Blesing,A/Open 2005/0-1 (39)}) 6. Nc3 (6. Nb5 $5 6... Qxd1+ 7. Kxd1
Na6 8. Be3 (8. Bf4 e5 9. Bxe5 Bg4+ 10. f3 Rd8+ 11. Nd2 f6 12. Bg3 Bf5 13. Bc4
Bb4 14. Re1+ Ne7 15. c3 Bc5 16. b4 Nxb4 17. cxb4 Bxb4 18. Re2 Rxd2+ 19. Rxd2
Bxd2 20. Kxd2 a6 21. Nd6+ Kd7 22. Re1 b5 23. Nxf5 {
1-0 Savchenko,V-Berthy,A/15th Summer Open 2005}) 8... b6 9. a4 Kd8 (9... Nf6 $1
10. a5 Nd5 11. Bd4 Bb7 12. axb6 axb6) 10. a5 Nf6 11. axb6 axb6 12. Bxb6+ 12...
Kd7 {looked decisive in Dizdar,S-Muratovic,E/TCh-BIH 2002 but 0-1 (48)}) 6...
Bb4 7. Be3 {
White doesn't have much here: if Black can get developed he can claim equality.
} (7. Qd3 Qe5+ 8. Be3 Bd7 9. Be2 Nf6 10. O-O O-O 11. Nf3 Qa5 12. Bd4 Be7 13. h3
13... Nc6 {Mikuz,S-Muradore,A/7th HIT Open 2002/1-0 (29)}) 7... Bd7 $16 (7...
Nf6 8. Ndb5 Qc6 9. Qd4 $16) 8. Qd2 $14 {
Again, content to play simply, avoiding doubled pawns on the c-file.} ({
Sharper is} 8. Be2 $1 {when if} 8... Qxg2 $2 (8... Qe5 $16) (8... Bxc3+ 9. bxc3
Qa5) 9. Bf3 Qg6 10. Bxb7 e5 11. Nf3 {and Black is in all sorts of trouble.})
8... Nf6 $16 {Inviting an unusual Queen exchange; Black is left with the worse
minor pieces, however, and must decide how to deal with White's Queen's-side
Pawn majority if it starts to roll.} (8... Qa5 9. a3 $14 {
and Black isn't in bad shape.}) 9. Nxd5 Bxd2+ 10. Bxd2 Nxd5 11. O-O-O O-O 12.
Bd3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 14. c4 Nc7 15. f3 15... Rfd8 $16 (15... b5 16. c5 $14)
16. Bf4 (16. Be3 {: c5 is a key square.}) 16... Na6 17. a3 17... Ba4 {
Black is fighting down White's theoretical plus (Fritz declares equality, but
there are some long-term ideas that White can use to torture Black).} 18. Bc2
Bxc2 19. Kxc2 19... f6 {Sometimes you can blot out an enemy Bishop with pawns,
but generally let them sit out of the way on the opposite colour squares.} 20.
Rxd8+ (20. Be3 $1) 20... Rxd8 21. Rd1 Rxd1 22. Kxd1 Nc5 23. Kc2 Nd7 24. b4 Kf7
25. Kd3 e5 26. Be3 {With rival majorities, the Bishop can influence play on
both sides at once, while the Knight usually fights on only one side.
Capablanca always use to win these; how is Jack's technique?} 26... a6 27. c5
Ke6 28. Kc4 28... f5 {Correctly insisting on some active play of his own; if
Black goes passive he will die straightforwardly.} 29. a4 {White plans b5}
29... e4 $14 (29... Nf6 30. b5 $11) 30. f4 $11 ({Fritz prefers} 30. fxe4 30...
Ne5+ 31. Kc3 31... fxe4 $16 {
but I generally wouldn't trust a computer's judgement in an endgame.} 32. Bd4 (
32. Kd4 $1)) 30... g5 $16 {Good idea; Fritz can see only the extra pawn yet if
Black can get in ...f4 he will be laughing. But I don't think Black can manage
...f4, so the materialistic Fritz might be right.} (30... Nf6 $5 $11 31. Kd4
Ng4 32. Bg1 Nf6 33. b5 axb5 34. axb5 Nd5 35. g3 h6 36. h4) 31. b5 $11 (31. fxg5
$5 31... Ne5+ 32. Kc3 $16 32... Nd3 33. g3 Kd5) 31... axb5+ 32. axb5 32... gxf4
$16 (32... g4 $5 $14) 33. Bxf4 33... Ne5+ $4 $18 {Pushing his luck!} (33... Nf6
$142 34. c6 bxc6 35. bxc6 35... Nd5 $14) 34. Kd4 $16 (34. Bxe5 $1 $142 {
is Fritz' suggestion, but you have to be sure you aren't allowing Black
unnecessary chances.} 34... Kxe5 (34... e3 35. Bg3 $18) 35. b6 e3 36. c6 e2 37.
cxb7 $1 37... e1=Q 38. b8=Q+ {The check is very helpful.} 38... Kf6 39. Qd6+
Kf7 40. Qd7+ Kg6 41. b7 {and White just needs a place to hide with the King:}
41... Qc1+ 42. Kb5 Qb2+ 43. Kc6 Qc3+ 44. Kb6 Qe5 45. Qc7 Qb2+ 46. Kc6 Qc2+ 47.
Kd7 Qd2+ 48. Kc8) 34... Ng6 (34... Nf7 35. Bc1 $16) 35. Bb8 $14 (35. c6 $5 $142
{and the Black King cannot get across in time:} 35... bxc6 36. b6 $18 36... Nf8
37. b7 Nd7 38. b8=Q Nxb8 39. Bxb8 {and White has a boring win}) 35... h5 $16 (
35... Kd7 $5 $14) 36. g3 $14 (36. c6 $5 {is still a punt:} 36... bxc6 37. b6
$16) 36... h4 $2 $18 {Black might regret allowing White a passed h-pawn.} (
36... Kd7 $5 $14 $142) 37. gxh4 Nxh4 38. Bg3 38... Nf3+ $2 (38... Ng6 $142 39.
c6 39... bxc6 $16) 39. Ke3 Kd5 (39... Kd7 40. h4 40... Ng1 $18) (39... Ne5 40.
Bxe5 Kxe5 41. c6 Kd6 42. cxb7 Kc7 43. h4 {told you!}) 40. c6 $1 {
As we've seen, Jack could have tried this earlier.} 40... f4+ 41. Bxf4 (41.
Bxf4 bxc6 42. b6 $18) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Jon Morgan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D60"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "69"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{All the right moves, but not necessarily in the right order, and Black was
under pressure.  Although Jack picked up a pawn, Black had a chance to create
a strong defensive pin.  Sadly, once Jonathan missed this, he immediately
found himself victim of an evern stronger pin.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 (2. Bf4 2... Bf5
$11) 2... e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 c6 6. Nf3 Nbd7 7. Bd3 {Botvinnik's
speciality. The idea is to accept an isolated pawn and play for the attack.}
7... O-O 8. O-O h6 (8... dxc4 9. Bxc4 9... Nd5 {
is Capablanca's manoeuvre, which should equalise.}) 9. Bh4 c5 (9... dxc4 10.
Bxc4 Nd5 11. Bg3) 10. Rc1 10... b6 $16 {Black has lost a couple of tempi here,
and so White's more active pieces can probe for weaknesses.} (10... cxd4 11.
exd4 dxc4 12. Bxc4 $14) 11. cxd5 exd5 12. Ne5 $14 (12. Qa4 $5 $16 {
is a manoeuvre I've seen Marshall play, a bit more directed to Black's holes.})
12... Bb7 $16 (12... Nxe5 13. dxe5 Ng4 14. Bg3 $16) 13. f4 $14 {
The usual reply to this idea is} (13. Bf5 13... Re8 $16) 13... Ne4 (13... Nxe5
14. fxe5 Nd7 15. Bxe7 15... Qxe7 {
and ...f6, but Black's loose position doesn't allow for it here.}) 14. Bxe7
14... Nxc3 $16 (14... Qxe7 $5 $142 15. Nxd7 Qxd7 16. Bxe4 dxe4 17. dxc5 17...
Qc6 $14) 15. Rxc3 (15. Bxd8 Nxd1 16. Nxd7 Rfxd8 17. Rfxd1 17... c4 $16) 15...
Qxe7 {Now Black is just losing a pawn, but the b-pawn is a long way from
queening, and White's backward e-pawn is not much to boast about.} 16. Nxd7
Qxd7 17. dxc5 bxc5 18. Rxc5 Qe6 19. Qc1 Rac8 20. Rxc8 Rxc8 21. Qd2 Qc6 22. Re1
Re8 23. Kf2 $11 {Equal, says Fritz.} (23. b4 $5 $16 $142) 23... Re6 $16 (23...
d4 $5 $142 24. Bf1 dxe3+ 25. Rxe3 25... Qb6 $11 {
and White is in a very awkward pin.}) 24. Qc3 $14 (24. Qa5 $5 $16) 24... Qb6
$16 {Attacking the backward pawn on e3} (24... Qxc3 25. bxc3 Rc6 26. Rc1 $14)
25. Bf5 Rc6 26. Qe5 {A couple of moves later, White is back in control.} 26...
g6 27. Bd3 Re6 28. Qd4 Qa5 29. a3 f5 (29... Ba6 30. Bxa6 Qxa6 31. Qxd5 $18) 30.
Re2 Kf7 (30... Rc6 $18 $142) 31. Qh8 31... Ba6 $6 (31... Qb6 $18) 32. Qh7+ Kf6
33. Qxa7 {Black is now the one in an embarrassing pin.} 33... Rb6 (33... Qb6
34. Qxb6 Rxb6 35. Bxa6 35... Rxa6 $18) 34. b4 {Winning.} 34... Rb7 35. Qd4+ 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Simon Waters"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "83"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{Black played very modestly in the opening, content to seek equality later. 
Provoked beyond reason by this behaviour, Jack sacrificed a piece for some
connected passed pawns, which never really got going.  Simon
counter-sacrificed, giving equal material but a position where all the
inequalities were in White's favour; some active play by Jack set up a quick
kill.} 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. g3 $11 {A reasonable
approach: White usually gets a couple of free moves to improve his position in
the Scandinavian, by hitting the Black Queen, and in this way sets up Bf4. I
prefer Bc4/Nge2/Bf4, but there the Ne2 is not so active.} (5. Nf3 $5 $14 {
may be best.}) 5... a6 $14 (5... Nc6 6. Nb5 Qd8 7. Nf3 $15) 6. Bf4 Qd8 7. Bg2
7... e6 {One of the points about the Scandinavian is that Black can hope to
play a ...e6/...c6 structure with the Bc8 developed outside the pawn chain;
this move puts the game more into French Rubinstein territory with Black a few
tempi behind.} 8. Nf3 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Qe2 Nbd7 11. Rad1 c6 12. Ne5 (12. Rfe1
Qb6 13. Bc1 13... Qa5 $14) 12... Nd5 13. Bd2 13... f6 $16 (13... Nxe5 $5 14.
dxe5 14... Qb6 $14) 14. Nxc6 $1 $14 ({
Alert, but Fritz prefers to keep simple pressure with} 14. Nd3 14... N7b6 $16)
14... bxc6 15. Qxe6+ {With a pawn or three for the piece.} 15... Kh8 $2 $18 (
15... Rf7 $142 16. Qxc6 Nxc3 17. bxc3 17... Ra7 $16) 16. Qxc6 $16 {
with a passed pawn or two and enduring pressure.} ({Fritz prefers to leave the
third pawn for later, and instead play more actively with} 16. Nxd5 $142 16...
cxd5 17. Rfe1 $18) 16... Nxc3 17. Bxc3 $11 {
Getting the Bishop in front of a pawn that really wants to sprint.} (17. Qxc3
Rb8 18. Bf4 $16) 17... Rb8 18. d5 $17 {Fritz prefers Black now.} (18. Rfe1 $5
$11) 18... Bb7 $11 (18... Ne5 $5 19. Bxe5 19... fxe5 $17 {
when Black's pieces are active and fighting.}) 19. Qe6 {Threatening d6} 19...
Nc5 {
"Black is in command" says Fritz, but I doubt either player would suggest that.
} 20. Qh3 Bc8 21. Qh5 Bd6 (21... Na4 $1 22. Rd4 Nxc3 23. bxc3 Rb2) 22. Rd4 Qe8
23. Qd1 $17 (23. Qxe8 $5 $142 23... Rxe8 24. b4 $15) 23... Bd7 $15 (23... Na4
$5 $17 $142 {is still the right move.}) 24. Rh4 Bf5 25. b3 $17 (25. Bd4 $5 $15)
25... Qg6 26. Qd2 $19 (26. Qd4 $5 $17) 26... Bxc2 $17 {Reasonable.} (26... Ne4
$5 27. Bxe4 Bxe4 28. Re1 $19 28... Rbe8 {might be clearer; White's pieces
don't look as though they are working together effectively and the Pawns have
get to get going.}) 27. Rc1 27... Bxb3 $14 (27... Bd3 $17 $142) 28. axb3 28...
Nxb3 {Restoring material equality, but two Bishops and an advanced pawn add up
to something for White.} 29. Qc2 {The mate threat is Qxg6} 29... Qxc2 30. Rxc2
Rfc8 31. Be4 h6 32. Bf5 Rc5 33. Kg2 33... Rxd5 $2 $16 {
Never take pawns from strangers.} (33... Be7 $5 $142 34. Rb4 Rxb4 35. Bxb4 Rxc2
(35... Rxd5 $2 36. Rc8+ Rd8 37. Bxe7 Rxc8 38. Bxc8 $18) 36. Bxc2 Bxb4 37. Bxb3
37... g6 $11) 34. Rxh6+ $1 34... gxh6 35. Bxf6+ Kg8 36. Be6+ Kf8 37. Bxd5 Nc5
38. h4 Nd7 (38... Rb1 39. Bb2 Rd1 40. Bf3 $18) (38... a5 {
might give Black the counterplay he needs.}) 39. Bd4 {
"Domination", the study composers call it.} 39... Ne5 40. Re2 (40. f4 Nd3 41.
Rc6 41... Bxf4 $18) 40... Re8 $2 (40... Rb5 $142 41. Be4 41... Nc4 $18) 41. f4
Nf7 (41... Nd7 42. Bg7+ $1 42... Kxg7 43. Rxe8 43... Nf6 $18) 42. Bg7+ $1 (42.
Bg7+ Kxg7 43. Rxe8 $18) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "John Knowles"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A48"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "51"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{Black was content to achieve a solid position, perhaps not by the best route.
Jack played lots of the right sorts of moves without achieving much.  As it
was, Black's ideas came too late and White won simply, but perhaps if John had
played one fewer 'safe' move he would actually have the advantage!} 1. Nf3 Nf6
2. d4 g6 3. c4 3... e6 {
Doesn't really fit in with the system, but ...d5 is a reasonable goal.} (3...
Bg7 4. Nc3 $11) 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 d6 6. h3 O-O 7. Be3 Nbd7 8. Qd2 c5 9. d5 (9.
O-O-O cxd4 10. Nxd4 d5 11. exd5 exd5 12. cxd5 12... Nb6 $14) 9... e5 $16 {
Revealing Black's system to be a bit confused. This structure is familiar from
the King's Indian and Benoni: White has a choice of how to play the space
advantage, but it's psychologically easier to punt towards the Black King.} (
9... exd5 $5 10. exd5 b5 11. cxb5 11... Bb7 $11) 10. Bh6 $14 (10. g4 10... a6
$16) 10... Ne8 11. g4 a6 12. h4 $15 {Fritz now tags this as =+: fickle!} (12.
Be2 $5 $14 $142) 12... Ndf6 13. Bxg7 {Black might not miss that crummy bishop.}
13... Nxg7 (13... Kxg7 $143 14. g5 Nh5 15. Qe3 $11) 14. g5 Nfh5 15. O-O-O Nf4
16. Ne2 Ngh5 17. Nxf4 Nxf4 18. Ng1 {
White acts immediately to eliminate Black's biggest asset.} 18... a5 $11 {
Pointless: Black should welcome b2-b4.} (18... f5 $5 $142 {
is a natural break in the King's Indian, which Fritz likes very much for Black:
} 19. f3 (19. Bd3 fxe4 20. Bxe4 b5) 19... fxe4 20. fxe4 20... Bg4 $17) 19. Ne2
19... f5 $2 $18 {Timing... it's likely to lose a pawn, if nothing else.} (19...
Bg4 $5 $11 $142) 20. Nxf4 exf4 21. h5 fxe4 22. hxg6 {
With the decisive threat Qc3} 22... Qxg5 (22... hxg6 23. Bd3 Bg4 24. Qc3 $18)
23. gxh7+ 23... Kh8 {It's all g one pear-shaped for Black, but White still
needs to put a plan together.} 24. Re1 24... Qe5 {
Black is looking good but it's all a bit wobbly.} (24... Bf5 25. Bh3 Bxh3 26.
Rxh3 $18 {after which} 26... Rae8 27. Qxa5 27... e3 {is a practical try.}) 25.
Bd3 Bf5 26. Bxe4 (26. Bxe4 Bxe4 27. f3 $18 {
wins back the piece, leaving White with all the trumps.} 27... Qf6 28. Rxe4) ({
The metal monster suggests} 26. f3 $5 {is better:} 26... a4 (26... e3 27. Qg2
Bxd3 28. Reg1 {wins}) 27. fxe4 27... Bg6 $18) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Sean Pope"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C21"]
[Annotator "Fritz 9 (30s)"]
[PlyCount "63"]
[EventDate "2009.04.07"]

{Black always seemed to be on the back foot in this game of competing pawn
storms.  Jack pulls out an unexpected rabbit from his hat to win.} 1. e4 e5 2.
d4 exd4 3. Qxd4 3... d6 $14 {An immediate concession.} (3... Nf6 4. Nf3 $11) 4.
Nc3 Nc6 5. Qe3 Nf6 6. Bd2 Be7 7. O-O-O O-O 8. f4 a6 9. h3 9... b5 {
Black is not best placed to invite a battle of this type.} 10. g4 10... Bb7 $16
(10... b4 $1 11. Nd5 $14) 11. Bg2 $14 (11. g5 $1 11... Nd7 $16) 11... Na5 12.
b3 c5 13. g5 Nd7 14. h4 14... Qc7 {Black prepares the advance c4} 15. h5 15...
c4 $2 $18 {The point of course is to create open lines against the enemy King,
and this one sadly allows White to seal off some lines against his position
with gain of time.} (15... b4 $142 16. Na4 16... Rae8 $14) 16. b4 $1 16... Nc6
17. Nd5 Qd8 18. f5 {Now Black can try ...a5.} (18. h6 $5 18... g6 $18) 18...
Re8 (18... a5 {
is the only break left to Black, and the only way to make some trouble.}) 19.
g6 {forcing open some lines.} 19... h6 20. gxf7+ Kxf7 21. Qg3 21... Nf6 $4 {
Fritz hated this, although it's a natural try.} (21... Nce5 $142 22. Nf4 22...
Bf6 $16) 22. Nf4 (22. Qg6+ $1 $142 22... Kf8 23. Bxh6 $1 {
is a typical winning sacrifice.} (23. Nxe7 Nxe7 24. Qg3 Nxe4 25. Bxe4 25...
Bxe4 $17) 23... gxh6 24. Nf4 $18 {House!}) 22... Bf8 {
The critical moment has passed but Black is still up to his neck in it.} 23.
Ne6 (23. Bc3 23... Kg8 $18) 23... Rxe6 (23... Qd7 24. Bc3 Qe7 25. Nxf8 Kxf8 26.
Rxd6 $18) 24. fxe6+ Kxe6 (24... Kg8 25. Ne2 Qe7 26. Bxh6 Nxb4 27. a3 Nd3+ 28.
cxd3 $18) 25. Nh3 (25. Bc3 $5 25... Kd7 26. e5 26... Ne8 $18) 25... Ne5 26. Bc3
{White now gets a decisive attack} 26... Qc7 (26... Qe8 27. Rhf1 Kf7 28. Bxe5
Qxe5 29. Qxe5 dxe5 30. Rd7+ Kg8 31. Rxb7 31... Bxb4 $18) 27. Rhf1 {
White's moves suggest themselves.} 27... Re8 (27... Kf7 28. Bxe5 dxe5 29. Rxf6+
Kxf6 30. Qg6+ 30... Ke7 $18) 28. Bxe5 dxe5 (28... Kd7 29. Bxf6 29... gxf6 $18)
29. Qg6 29... Rd8 {White to play and win. This is where Jack's class shows: I
imagine most of us would have missed this opportunity, or ducked it even if we
saw it!} 30. Rxf6+ $1 30... gxf6 31. Ng5+ hxg5 32. Bh3+ (32. Bh3+ Ke7 33. Qh7+
{picking up the Queen.}) 1-0

[Event "?"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "NN"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[ECO "B40"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:09:50} 1. d4 e6 2. e4 c5 {[%t Val] ;} 3. Nf3 cxd4 4. Nxd4
$14{/= Transposing to the e6-Sicilian} 4... d5 {[%t Val] C}{?! In my opinion,
not best but playable.} (4... Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. g4 h6 7. g5 hxg5 8. Bxg5 Nc6 9.
Qd2 Qb6 10. Nb3 a6 11. O-O-O Be7 12. h4 Bd7 13. f4 O-O-O 14. Bg2 Ng4 15. Bxe7
Nxe7 16. Qxd6 Qxd6 17. Rxd6 Ne3 18. Bf3 Ng6 19. Rd3 Nc4 20. Rd4 Nb6 21. h5 Nxf4
22. e5 g5 23. Nc5 Bc6 24. Rxd8+ {...1/2-1/2, Hamarat Tunc 2603  - Andersson Ulf
2736 , 1998}) (4... a6 5. Bd3 Bc5 6. Nb3 Ba7 7. O-O Ne7 8. c4 d6 9. Nc3 e5 10.
Qe2 Be6 11. Be3 Bxe3 12. Qxe3 Nd7 13. Rfd1 Qb6 14. Qxb6 Nxb6 15. Rac1 O-O-O 16.
Na1 Kb8 17. b3 g6 18. Nc2 f5 19. Be2 Rhe8 20. Rd2 fxe4 21. Rcd1 Kc7 22. Nxe4 d5
23. cxd5 Nbxd5 24. Ng5 {...1/2-1/2, Van Oosterom Joop J - Andersson Ulf 2803 ,
2000}) (4... Nc6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 d5 8. O-O Nf6 9. Bf4 Be7 10. Re1
O-O 11. Qf3 Re8 12. e5 Nd7 13. Na4 Bb7 14. c4 Qa5 15. b3 c5 16. cxd5 Bxd5 17.
Qe2 Red8 18. Rac1 Bc6 19. Nb2 Nb6 20. Bb1 g6 21. Be3 Rac8 22. Qg4 c4 23. Bxb6
Qxb6 24. Nxc4 {...1/2-1/2, Timmerman Gert Jan 2747  - Andersson Ulf 2803 ,
2000}) (4... Qb6 5. Nb3 Nc6 6. Nc3 Nf6 7. Bd3 Be7 8. Be3 Qc7 9. f4 d6 10. Qf3
a6 11. O-O O-O 12. Rae1 Nb4 13. Qg3 b5 14. a3 Nxd3 15. cxd3 Bb7 16. f5 Qd8 17.
fxe6 fxe6 18. Nd4 Qd7 19. Qh3 e5 20. Nf5 Kh8 21. Rf3 Rae8 22. Ref1 d5 23. Rg3
Rf7 24. Nh6 {...1/2-1/2, Gerhardt Frank 2637  - Johansson Ingemar Nybro 2499 ,
2001})(4... d6 5. Nc3 a6 6. a4 Nf6 7. Be2 Nbd7 8. O-O Nc5 9. Bf3 h6 10. Re1 Be7
11. g3 O-O 12. Bg2 Qc7 13. h3 Rd8 14. a5 Rb8 15. Be3 b5 16. axb6 Rxb6 17. b3
{1/2-1/2, Brzozka Stefan 2525  - Godes Devid Rafailovich 2595 , RCCA 1991
Aljechin Memorial (1991-96)}) 5. exd5 Qxd5 (5... exd5 {?! }$16{ Not a good IQP
position for black, who is behind in development and will therefore struggle to
make a middlegame attack work.} 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. Qe2+ Qe7 8. Be3 Bxb5 9. Qxb5+
Qd7 10. Nc3 Nf6 11. Qxd7+ Kxd7 12. O-O-O Bc5 13. Nf5 Bxe3+ 14. Nxe3 Ke6 15.
Nexd5 Nxd5 16. Nxd5 Na6 17. Rhe1+ Kf5 18. Re7 Nc5 19. b4 Ne6 20. Rxf7+ Kg6 21.
Rxb7 a5 22. Nb6 Raf8 23. Rd6 {1-0, Rada Hannes 2309  - Fietkau Arnold 2048 ,
1990}) 6. Nc3 $14 6... Bb4 {+0.52 CAP} 7. Be3 {N} 7... Bd7 8. Qd2 {[%t Val] :}
{A bit passive.} (8. Qg4 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 {+0.72}) 8... Nf6 {[%t Val] C} (8... Qa5
9. Rd1 Nf6 10. Bd3 Nd5 11. Nde2 Nxe3 12. Qxe3 Nc6 13. O-O Rd8 14. a3 Be7 {+0.
29}) 9. Nxd5 Bxd2+ 10. Bxd2 Nxd5 {White has the two bishops and a QS pawn
majority, and therefore has a slight advantage for the endgame.} 11. O-O-O O-O
12. Bd3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 14. c4 {Taking away black's nice d4-outpost
Steinitz-style.} 14... Nc7 15. f3 Rfd8 16. Bf4 Na6 17. a3 (17. Rd2 Rdc8 18. Kb1
Nb4 19. Be2 Be8 20. Bd6 a5 21. b3 Na6 22. Re1 {+0.68}) 17... Ba4 18. Bc2 Bxc2
19. Kxc2 {With the bishop-pair gone, if black can reposition his misplaced
knight, he'll be fine.} 19... f6 20. Rxd8+ {[%t Val] :} 20... Rxd8 21. Rd1 Rxd1
22. Kxd1 Nc5 {[%t Val] >} 23. Kc2 Nd7 {Taking away the c5 square from the
knight and gaining space.} 24. b4 Kf7 25. Kd3 {[%t Val] 7} (25. c5 e5 26. Be3
a6 27. Kb3 Ke6 28. Kc4 {+0.44}) 25... e5 26. Be3 a6 {[%t Val] >} (26... b6 27.
Bd2 Ke6 28. Ke4 f5+ 29. Ke3 Nf6 30. a4 g5 31. Bc3 {+0.18}) 27. c5 {Allowing the
king to come into the vacant c4 square.} 27... Ke6 28. Kc4 f5 29. a4 e4 {Making
a passed pawn, but it will be difficult to hold it.} 30. f4 $6{[%t Val] 2} (30.
fxe4 $5 30... Ne5+ 31. Kd4 {+0.48}) 30... g5 {[%t Val] R}{?! Ambitious! Black
goes for the jugular by sacrificing a pawn for connected passers.} (30... Nf6
$1 31. Bd4 Nd5 32. b5 axb5+ 33. axb5 e3 34. g3 e2 35. Bf2 Nf6 36. Be1 g6 37. c6
bxc6 38. bxc6 Kd6 39. Kd3 Kxc6 40. Kxe2 Ng4 41. h3 Nf6 42. Kf3 Ne4 {+0.00}) 31.
b5 $6{[%t Val] E} (31. fxg5 Ne5+ 32. Kc3 Ng4 33. Bf4 {Looks good for white (+2.
5: R3)}) 31... axb5+ 32. axb5 gxf4 33. Bxf4 Ne5+ {[%t Val] ^94 }{?? Seems ok,
but actually leads to a losing position.} (33... b6 $1 34. c6 Nf6 35. Kd4 Nd5
36. Bg5 Nc7 37. Kc4 Nd5 38. g3 e3 39. Kd3 e2 40. Kxe2 Nc3+ 41. Kd3 Nxb5 42. Bf4
Na7 43. c7 Kd7 44. Kc4 {+0.72}) 34. Kd4 {[%t Val] H} (34. Bxe5 $1 34... Kxe5
35. b6 {Is apparently winning for white...} 35... e3 {+4.50} (35... Ke6 36. c6
Kd6 37. cxb7)(35... f4 36. c6 bxc6 37. b7)36. c6 e2 37. cxb7 e1=Q 38. b8=Q+ Kf6
39. Qd6+ Kf7 40. Qd7+ Kg8 41. Qd5+ Kh8 42. Qd4+ Kg8 43. b7 {And wins} 43... Qe8
44. Qd5+ Kh8 45. Kc5 Qb8 46. Qd6 Qa7+ 47. Qb6 Qb8 48. Qf6+ Kg8 49. Qe6+ Kg7 50.
Qd7+ Kf6 (50... Kg8 51. Qc8+)51. Qd6+) 34... Ng6 {[%t Val] \}{? Taking the
knight away from the action} (34... Nf7 $1 35. c6 bxc6 36. bxc6 Nd6 37. Kc5 Nc8
38. g3 Ke7 39. Bh6 Ke6 40. h4 Nd6 41. Bf4 Ne8 42. c7 Kd7 43. Kd4 Nxc7 44. Ke5
h5 45. Kxf5 {+0.85}) 35. Bb8 {[%t Val] <}{? Seems a bit pointless and blocks
the queening square. Again, c6 wins.} (35. c6 $1 35... bxc6 36. b6 {! +3.25}
36... Nf8 37. b7 Nd7 38. b8=Q Nxb8 39. Bxb8 {Eventually, the black pawns will
die.}) 35... h5 {[%t Val] K} (35... Kd7 36. g4 fxg4 37. Bg3 Nf8 38. Kxe4 Ne6
39. Kd5 Ng5 40. c6+ bxc6+ 41. bxc6+ Kc8 42. Bf4 Nf3 43. Ke4 h5 44. h3 Kd8 45.
hxg4 {With a draw.}) 36. g3 {[%t Val] <} (36. c6 $5 36... bxc6 37. b6 {+0.98})
36... h4 {[%t Val] Y}{?? The losing move.} (36... Ne7 {With excellent drawing
chances.} 37. Bc7 Ng6 38. Bb8 Ne7 39. Bc7 Ng6 40. Bb8 Ne7 41. Bc7 Ng6 42. Bb8
Ne7 43. Bc7 Ng6 44. Bb8 Ne7 45. Bc7 Ng6 46. Bb8 Ne7 47. Bc7 Ng6 48. Bb8 Ne7
{+0.37}) 37. gxh4 Nxh4 {And now the knight is too far away to stop the white
pawns.} 38. Bg3 Nf3+ {[%t Val] ]} 39. Ke3 Kd5 40. c6 f4+ 41. Bxf4 {[%t Val] `}
{White managed to win what was quite an even endgame. Black's correct plan was
to keep his knight on the QS whereas white's winning plan required a c6-push.
Still, I must admire Tim for his active attempt to take on his titled opponent.
} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Sean Pope"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "C22"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:05:02} 1. e4 e5 2. d4 {=} 2... exd4 3. Qxd4 {[%t Val] -}{?!
Allows easy equality.} 3... d6 {[%t Val] 8}{?! A bit passive, but has been
tried at GM level. d5 may be played in one move if the position demands it
after 3...Nf6 or Nc6.} (3... Nf6 4. Bg5 $5 (4. Nf3) (4. Nc3)(4. Bd3 {=})4...
Nc6 5. Qd1 {Admits he's lost a tempo.} (5. Qe3 $15)5... Be7 6. Nd2 Nxe4 7. Bxe7
$17 7... Qxe7 8. Be2 O-O 9. Nxe4 Qxe4 10. Nf3 Re8 11. Kf1 d5 12. Bd3 Qe7 13.
Qd2 Bg4 14. Re1 Qd6 15. Ng5 Rxe1+ 16. Qxe1 h6 17. h3 Bd7 18. Nf3 Re8 19. Qd2
Nb4 20. Be2 Qc5 21. c3 Bb5 22. cxb4 Rxe2 23. bxc5 {...0-1, Tapiwa - Claudio
Bongiovanni, 2003})(3... Nc6 4. Qe3 Nf6 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Nc3 d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8.
Nxd5 Qxd5 {=} 9. Ne2 Bf5 10. Nc3 Qc5 11. Qxc5 Bxc5 12. Bb5 O-O-O 13. Bxc6 bxc6
14. O-O-O Rhe8 15. Rhe1 h5 16. Be3 Rxd1+ 17. Kxd1 Bd6 18. h3 a6 19. f3 f6
{1/2-1/2, Kharitonov Aleksandr Alekseevich 2385  - Sidenko Anatoly, IECG 18/
7/2004 WC.2006.S.00006}) 4. Nc3 Nc6 5. Qe3 {[%t Val] 3} 5... Nf6 6. Bd2 Be7 7.
O-O-O O-O 8. f4 a6 {[%t Val] 7} (8... d5 {! =}) 9. h3 {[%t Val] 1} 9... b5 {[%t
Val] 9} 10. g4 Bb7 {[%t Val] G}{+0.29 CAP} 11. Bg2 {[%t Val] 6}{N} (11. g5 $5
11... Nd7 12. h4 Na5 13. h5 Nb6 {+0.80 With traditional opposite side castling
attacks.}) 11... Na5 {[%t Val] 9}{! Forces a concession from white on the QS.}
12. b3 c5 (12... b4 $5) 13. g5 Nd7 14. h4 Qc7 {[%t Val] D}{A little slow.
Urgency is needed as white's attack is coming fast.} (14... b4 15. Na4 Qc7 16.
Ne2 Rae8 17. Kb1 {+0.22}) 15. h5 c4 {[%t Val] V}$6 (15... Rae8 {! Is much
better according to Rybka.} 16. h6 g6 17. Nd5 Bxd5 {! The main difference
between the game and this variation: black lops off white's powerful knight.}
18. Qc3 f6 19. exd5 b4 20. Qb2 Rb8 21. Re1 Rf7 22. Kb1 c4 23. Qd4 Nc5 24. Nf3
cxb3 25. cxb3 Naxb3 26. axb3 Nxb3 27. Qd3 {+0.68}) 16. b4 {! Slows black's
attack enough for the advantage.} 16... Nc6 17. Nd5 {White dominates in the
centre.} 17... Qd8 18. f5 {[%t Val] H} (18. h6 {! (R3)} 18... g6 19. Nf3 {+1.
72} 19... a5 20. bxa5 Nc5 21. f5 {With a wild position is preferred by Rybka.})
18... Re8 19. g6 {[%t Val] E} 19... h6 20. gxf7+ Kxf7 21. Qg3 Nf6 {?? Allows a
sacrifice with an immediate win for white.} (21... Nce5 $1 22. Nf4 Nf8 23. Nge2
Bf6 24. Kb1 Kg8 25. Nd4 Qe7 {+0.72}) 22. Nf4 {[%t Val] V} (22. Qg6+ $1 22...
Kf8 23. Bxh6 {! +15.00} 23... gxh6 24. Nf4 Qd7 25. Qxh6+ Kg8 26. Qg6+ Kf8 {And
it's all over.}) 22... Bf8 23. Ne6 Rxe6 {! The knight must go. Black is down
but not out.} 24. fxe6+ Kxe6 {[%t Val] ]}{?! +- Tempting, but brings the king
dangerously close to white's pieces.} (24... Kg8 $5 25. Ne2 Qe7 26. Nf4 Ne5 27.
Nd5 Qxe6 28. Nc7 Qf7 29. Nxa8 Bxa8 30. Rdf1 Kh8 {+2.13}) 25. Nh3 {[%t Val] W}
(25. Bc3 $5 25... Qe8 26. Nf3 Kd7 27. e5 Ne4 28. Qg4+ Kc7 29. Qxe4 Nxe5 30. Qf4
g5 31. hxg6 Nxg6 32. Qf6 Rd8 33. Rhe1 Be7 34. Qg7 Bxf3 35. Bxf3 {+3.75}) 25...
Ne5 26. Bc3 Qc7 {[%t Val] ]} 27. Rhf1 {White's attack is relentless. The white
army co-ordinates for the kill whilst black's a8 rook can only obseve and his
f8 bishop is tied to the defence of the g8-pawn.} 27... Re8 (27... Rd8
{Provides a slightly sterner test.}) 28. Bxe5 $1 28... dxe5 {White opens lines
on black's king.} 29. Qg6 Rd8 30. Rxf6+ {! A forcing temporary sacrifice of the
exchange.} 30... gxf6 31. Ng5+ {! To clear the h3 square for the bishop.} 31...
hxg5 32. Bh3+ {[%t Val] b}{Black resigned becasue of...} 32... Ke7 33. Qh7+ Ke8
34. Qxc7 {Powerful stuff from Mr. Rudd!} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Daniel Frean"]
[WhiteElo "2357"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "E56"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:05:24} 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. d4 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Bd3 c5 6.
Nf3 d5 7. O-O Nc6 8. a3 cxd4 {[%t Val] ;}$14{/=} 9. axb4 dxc3 10. bxc3 e5 {N}
{[%t Val] C}{?! +0.72 CAP} (10... dxc4 {Says HS Masterbook.} 11. Bxc4 Qc7 12.
Qb3 b6 13. Rd1 Bb7 14. Be2 a5 15. Bb2 Rfd8 16. Rxd8+ Rxd8 17. Qc4 Qb8 18. Qb5
Rd5 19. Qa4 Ne5 20. c4 Nxf3+ 21. Bxf3 Rg5 22. Qd1 h5 23. Bxf6 gxf6 24. h4 Bxf3
25. Qxf3 Rf5 26. Qc6 Kg7 27. bxa5 bxa5 28. Qa4 Qb2 29. Ra2 Qb1+ 30. Kh2 {...
0-1, Kiprov Alexander Alexandro - Weiner Ing Milan 2407 , 1973 corr})(10... Qc7
11. Qe2 Bd7 12. e4 dxe4 13. Bxe4 Nxe4 14. Qxe4 f6 15. Rd1 Rf7 16. Be3 e5 17.
Bc5 Rd8 18. Bd6 Bf5 19. Qxf5 Rxd6 20. c5 Rdd7 21. Qe6 Kf8 22. Rd6 Nd8 23. Rxd7
Rxd7 24. Qf5 Kg8 25. h4 b6 26. cxb6 axb6 27. c4 {1/2-1/2, Yudovich Mikhail
Mikhailovich 2452  - Niephaus W, ? 1957 corr URS-GER team m}) 11. b5 dxc4
$6{[%t Val] J} (11... e4 $5 12. bxc6 exd3 {The bishop-pair is very stong in
this endgame. This variation gets rid of it (Rybka 3)} 13. cxb7 Bxb7 14. Qxd3
Qc7 15. c5 a5 {+0.33}) 12. Bxc4 e4 13. bxc6 Qxd1 $2{[%t Val] Z}{White's bishops
are massive in this position. This loss of a tempo puts black seriously on the
back foot.} (13... exf3 $1 14. Qxf3 Qc7 15. h3 Qxc6 16. Qxc6 bxc6 {+0.80 And
black at least has his a-pawn to compensate the bishop pair.}) 14. Rxd1 exf3
15. Ba3 Re8 16. c7 {[%t Val] R}{?! (R3)} (16. Bb5 $1 16... a6 17. Bb4 {+2.63
And either black sacrifices the exchange, or white attacks the black rook with
c7, whice is now out of squares.}) 16... Bg4 17. h3 Bh5 $6{[%t Val] \} (17...
Bf5 {+1.33} 18. g4 Be6 {And the bishop is better here than on g6 (Rybka 3)})
18. g4 {The difference between white's c-pawn and black's f-pawn is clear.}
18... Bg6 19. Bc5 {[%t Val] V} (19. Be7 $3 19... Rac8 20. Bb5 Rxc7 21. Bxf6
{+3.25}) 19... Ne4 {[%t Val] _}$2 (19... Rac8 $1 20. Bb5 Rxc7 21. Bxe8 Nxe8 22.
Rd8 f6 23. Bxa7 {And black can fight.} 23... Rxc3 24. Bd4 Rc7 25. Raa8 Re7 26.
Rab8 {+1.72}) 20. Rxa7 Rac8 21. Bb6 Nxc3 22. Rd8 Be4 23. Kh2 Bc6 24. Ra3 Ne4
(24... Na4 {! Keeps black barely in the game by preventing white's a-rook from
going to d3.} 25. Ba5 Nc5) 25. Rad3 {And black resigned as he has to give up a
rook for the pawn or allow it to promote after Rxc8.} (25. Rxc8 {Would be
better as black can't give a rook for the pawn! Clearly Jack needs to try
harder- Ish} 25... Rxc8 26. Rd3 Kf8 27. Rd8+) 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Richard Scholes"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "A09"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:13:07} 1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 d4 3. g3 Nc6 {=} 4. Bg2 Nf6 {N} (4...
e5 5. d3 Nf6 6. O-O {transposes to our game} 6... Bd6 7. e3 O-O 8. exd4 exd4 9.
Bg5 h6 10. Bxf6 Qxf6 11. Nbd2 Bf5 12. Qb3 Bb4 13. Rfe1 a5 14. a3 a4 15. Qc2
Bxd2 16. Qxd2 Rfe8 17. Rad1 Rad8 18. Rxe8+ Rxe8 19. Re1 Rxe1+ 20. Nxe1 Qe7 21.
Nc2 Qd7 22. Bxc6 bxc6 23. f3 c5 24. Kf2 {...1/2-1/2, Tietjen Ronald - Straka
Ing Zdenek 2453 , Chessfriend.com 27/12/2004 AR.2004.Q.00006}) 5. O-O e5 6. d3
h6 {[%t Val] 9}{!? Does no harm, but black should not fear Bg5.} (6... a5 {! }
$15) 7. e3 {[%t Val] 3} 7... Bc5 8. exd4 exd4 9. Re1+ Be6 {[%t Val] 8} 10. Ne5
Nxe5 11. Rxe5 Bd6 12. Rb5 {[%t Val] 4} 12... Rb8 {[%t Val] <} (12... O-O $5 13.
Bxb7 a6 14. Rb3 Ra7 15. Bc6 Nd7 16. Nd2 Nc5 17. Ra3 Nb7 18. b4 Bxb4 {+0.07})
13. Rxb7 Rxb7 {Black has a strong pawn on d4 and well placed pieces in
compensation for his pawn. So far, Richard has played admirably.} 14. Bxb7 O-O
$2 15. Nd2 Bc5 {[%t Val] H}{?! Black must attack or waste his lead in
development.} (15... Bf5 16. Ne4 Bxe4 {+0.48}) 16. Ne4 Bb6 $6{[%t Val] Q}
(16... Nd7 $5 17. Qh5 Be7 18. Bc6 {+0.85}) 17. b4 a5 18. c5 {White has taken
over the initiative after black's slightly inaccurate play.} 18... Ba7 19. a3
axb4 {[%t Val] U} 20. axb4 Bb8 21. Nxf6+ {Trading down when ahead.} 21... Qxf6
22. Qf3 Qe7 {A pawn down, black avoids an endgame at the expense of becoming
more passive.} 23. Bb2 Rd8 24. Re1 {[%t Val] T} 24... Qd7 {[%t Val] X} (24...
Qg5 {Was more active.}) 25. Bc6 Qc8 26. b5 Bg4 27. Qf4 Qf5 {In order to avoid
complete passivity, black acquieces to an exchange of queens.} 28. Qxf5 Bxf5
{With an extra pawn and far more active position (plus black's poor DS bishop),
white is completely winning.} 29. Re8+ Rxe8 30. Bxe8 Bxd3 31. Bxd4 Ba7 32. b6
cxb6 33. c6 {[%t Val] G}{? Allows counter-chances} (33. cxb6 $1 33... Bb8 34.
f4 Kf8 35. Bc6 {+2.38 Keeps black passive.}) 33... Ba6 $2{[%t Val] Z} (33...
Bb8 $1 34. Bxb6 Kf8 {+0.80} 35. Bd7 Ke7 36. Bc5+ Bd6 37. Bd4 f6 38. Kg2 Bb4 39.
Kf3 Kd6 40. Be8 Kc7 {Wit ha good shot at a draw.}) 34. Bd7 Bb5 35. f4 $6{[%t
Val] Q} (35. Be5 $5 35... g5 36. Kg2 {+2.63} 36... Kf8 37. Bf6 {Completely ties
black down once more.}) 35... Kf8 36. f5 {[%t Val] G} (36. Be5 $5 36... Ke7 37.
Bxg7 {+1.27}) 36... f6 37. Bc3 Ke7 38. Bb4+ Kf7 {[%t Val] ^94 }{?? Brings the
king away from the action and any drawing chances.} (38... Kd8 $1{Black's only
active try.} 39. Kg2 (39. Bf8 Bd3 40. Bxg7 b5+ 41. Kg2 Bd4 42. Bxh6 b4 43. Be6
Be4+ {Is the human choice.})39... Bd3 40. Kf3 Bb8 41. Bf8 Be5 42. Bxg7 h5 43.
Ke3 Bc2 44. Bf8 Kc7 {+0.80}) 39. Be6+ Ke8 40. c7 Bd7 41. c8=Q+ Bxc8 42. Bxc8
Kf7 43. Kg2 Bb8 44. Be6+ {! Now black's king won't be able to protect the
g7-pawn without trading bishops.} 44... Ke8 45. Kf3 Be5 46. Kg4 Bd4 47. Kh5 Bc5
48. Bxc5 bxc5 49. Kg6 Kf8 50. g4 $22 50... c4 51. Bxc4 {[%t Val] c}{The IM
pounced on a couple of inaccuracies from his opponent, who made only one move
which could reasonably be called a serious error, and this was under severe
pressure.} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Brian Aldwin"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "A36"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:04:30} 1. c4 c5 2. g3 Nc6 {=} 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. Nc3 e5 5. e3 {+0.
00 CAP} 5... Ne7 {[%t Val] I}{? Brings the knight away from the action. I can't
say I understand why.} (5... Be7 $5 6. Nge2 d6 (6... O-O 7. O-O d6 8. d4 cxd4
9. exd4 Bg4 10. d5 Nd4 11. f3 Nxe2+ 12. Qxe2 Bh5 13. g4 Bg6 14. Ne4 Bxe4 15.
fxe4 a5 16. Be3 Nd7 17. Rf2 Bg5 18. Raf1 Bxe3 19. Qxe3 Nc5 20. g5 Qe7 21. h4 f6
22. gxf6 Rxf6 23. Rxf6 gxf6 24. h5 Qg7 25. h6 {...1/2-1/2, Prihodko Petr
Vladimirovich 2200  - Nikiforov Aleksandr Ivanovich 2200 , RCCA 2004 Qual
tournament EM-KÍ-6  0304})7. a3 Bg4 8. O-O Qd7 9. d3 h5 10. h4 O-O {-0.04}) 6.
Nf3 d6 {[%t Val] M} 7. d4 cxd4 8. exd4 Bg4 {[%t Val] X}{? Loses material by
force.} (8... Nc6 {Admitting his mistake.} 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Qxd8+ {+1.07}) 9.
dxe5 dxe5 10. Qxd8+ Rxd8 11. Nxe5 b6 {[%t Val] \} 12. Bg5 Bd7 13. Nb5 $6{[%t
Val] X} (13. O-O-O $5 13... a6 14. Bd5 {+4.50}) 13... Bxb5 14. cxb5 Nfd5 {[%t
Val] \} 15. O-O-O {[%t Val] U}{?! Gives away material, but still winning.} (15.
Nc6 $5 15... Nxc6 16. Bxd8 Bb4+ 17. Kf1 Nxd8 18. Bxd5 Ne6 19. Rd1 Ke7 20. Kg2
{+3.25}) 15... f6 16. Nc6 Nxc6 17. bxc6 fxg5 18. Bxd5 Bd6 $6{[%t Val] \} (18...
Rd6 {! Gives the king the d8-square for escape.} 19. h4 g4 20. f4 gxf3 21. Rhf1
{+1.56} 21... Rf6 22. Rxf3 Bd6 {With some drawing chances due to bishops of
opposite colours.}) 19. Rhe1+ Kf8 20. Bb3 Bc7 21. Rd7 Rxd7 22. cxd7 {[%t Val]
\}{Black resigns in a position where, to the untrained eye, it's not all
over...} 22... g6 23. Kd2 Kg7 24. Re7+ Kf6 25. Re8 Kg7 {But black's king will
remain passive until the white king comes in and wins the day.} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Jon Morgan"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "D60"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 0:10:19} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 {A nice, active
response to the QGD} 4... Be7 5. e3 $14{/=} 5... c6 {[%t Val] 7} 6. Nf3 Nbd7 7.
Bd3 O-O 8. O-O h6 9. Bh4 {[%t Val] 6} 9... c5 {[%t Val] ;}{!? A decent move
which has been tried at GM level several times.} 10. Rc1 b6 11. cxd5 exd5
$2{+0.37 CAP} (11... Nxd5 {Is also fine.}) 12. Ne5 {N} 12... Bb7 13. f4 {[%t
Val] <} 13... Ne4 {[%t Val] F}{Complications ensue!} (13... Nxe5 {+0.37}) 14.
Bxe7 Nxc3 $6{[%t Val] T} (14... Qxe7 $5 15. Bxe4 dxe4 16. Nxd7 Qxd7 17. dxc5
Qc6 18. Qd6 bxc5 19. Rfd1 Rfc8 20. Qe7 Re8 21. Qd7 Qxd7 22. Rxd7 Bc6 23. Rd6
Rac8 24. Rcd1 f6 {+0.76}) 15. Rxc3 {[%t Val] >}{White keeps it simple but...}
(15. Bxd8 $1 15... Nxd1 16. Nxd7 Rfxd8 {+1.46} 17. Rfxd1 Rxd7 18. dxc5 bxc5 19.
Rxc5 $16{ White's extra pawn and more active rook aiming at the isolani give
him winning chances.}) 15... Qxe7 16. Nxd7 Qxd7 17. dxc5 bxc5 {[%t Val] I}
(17... d4 18. Rc4 Qc6 19. Qe2 dxe3 20. Be4 Qc7 21. Bxb7 Qxb7 22. c6 Qa6 23. Rc2
Qxe2 24. Rxe2 {+0.44}) 18. Rxc5 $16{ Again, the extra pawn gives white the
advantage. An almost identical position has arisen, but with the queens on the
board.} 18... Qe6 19. Qc1 {[%t Val] D} (19. Re1 Rfc8 20. Rxc8+ Rxc8 21. Bb1 Qe7
{+0.93}) 19... Rac8 20. Rxc8 (20. Re1 Qb6 21. Rxc8 {+0.72}) 20... Rxc8 21. Qd2
Qc6 $6{[%t Val] L} (21... Re8 {! Forces white either to give up the extra pawn
or to get passive in defending it.} 22. Rd1 (22. Re1 d4 23. e4 Qxa2)22... Qxe3+
23. Qxe3 Rxe3 24. Kf2 Re7 25. b4 Kf8 26. a4 {+0.44}) 22. Re1 Re8 23. Kf2 {[%t
Val] 2}{? Seems natural, but allows back a tactical blow.} (23. Qa5 $1 23... a6
24. Qb4 d4 25. e4 Rd8 26. a3 Rd7 27. Rd1 Rd8 28. Qd2 {+1.02}) 23... Re6 {[%t
Val] Q}{Black misses his chance} (23... d4 $1 24. Bf1 Qf6 {+0.00 =}) 24. Qc3
{[%t Val] K} (24. Qa5 $5 24... d4 25. e4 Ba6 26. f5 Qb6 27. Qxb6 Rxb6 28. Bxa6
{+1.27}) 24... Qb6 {[%t Val] Q} (24... Qxc3 $5 25. bxc3 Ba6 26. Rd1 Bxd3 27.
Rxd3 {With a tough rook ending.} 27... Ra6 28. Rxd5 Rxa2+ 29. Kf3 g6 30. c4 Rc2
31. Ra5 Rxc4 32. Rxa7 {+0.98}) 25. Bf5 $6{[%t Val] K} (25. Qd4 $5 25... Qa5 26.
a3 Rb6 27. Rd1 Ba6 28. h3 Bxd3 29. Rxd3 Qb5 30. Rd2 Qb3 31. Qxd5 Qxd5 32. Rxd5
Rxb2+ {+1.27}) 25... Rc6 {[%t Val] M} 26. Qe5 {[%t Val] J} 26... g6 27. Bd3 Re6
$6{[%t Val] Q} (27... Qd8 $5 28. g3 Ba6 29. Bxa6 Rxa6 30. a3 Re6 31. Qd4 {+0.
93}) 28. Qd4 Qa5 29. a3 f5 {[%t Val] W}{?! Played in order to stop white from
playing f5. However, creates more weakness on the KS.} (29... Rb6 $5 30. Re2
Rb3 31. h3 Qc7 32. f5 Qb6 33. Qxb6 Rxb6 34. b4 Ba6 35. Rd2 Kg7 36. fxg6 fxg6
{+1.22}) 30. Re2 Kf7 $6 31. Qh8 {The white queen penetrates the black position
for some munchin'} 31... Ba6 {[%t Val] \}{?! Doesn't help things.} (31... Qb6
{Keeping more pieces on when behind.}) 32. Qh7+ Kf6 33. Qxa7 Rb6 {? Now the
queen has no square to run to after...} 34. b4 $1 34... Rb7 35. Qd4+ {[%t Val]
c}{In a very complicated game, Jon made many small errors which were pounced on
by Jack.} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Simon Waters"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 1:30:33} 1. e4 d5 {[%t Val] :} 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 $14 4. d4
Nf6 5. g3 {[%t Val] 2} 5... a6 {[%t Val] 8} (5... Bg4 6. Nge2 Bf3 7. Rg1 e6 8.
Qd3 Qc6 9. g4 Na6 10. Rg3 Nb4 11. Qxf3 Nxc2+ 12. Kd1 Qxf3 13. Rxf3 Nxa1 14. g5
Ng4 15. Bd2 Nxh2 {0-1, Law Steve - Smilovici Emil, IECG 18/ 8/2003 TE.2003.P.
01206}) 6. Bf4 {[%t Val] 5} 6... Qd8 {[%t Val] B}{N} (6... Qb6 $5 7. Qd3 Nc6 8.
O-O-O Nb4 9. Qc4 c6 10. Bd2 a5 {+0.11}) 7. Bg2 e6 8. Nf3 {N} 8... Be7 9. O-O
O-O 10. Qe2 {+0.48 CAP} 10... Nbd7 {N} 11. Rad1 c6 12. Ne5 {[%t Val] :} (12. a3
h6 13. Rfe1 Qb6 14. Bc1 a5 15. Ne5 Qa6 16. Qf3 Nd5 17. Bf1 Nxe5 18. dxe5 b5
{+0.64}) 12... Nd5 13. Bd2 {I missed the} 13... f6 {I missed the sacrifice}
$2{[%t Val] Q} (13... Nxe5 $1 14. dxe5 Qc7 15. Ne4 b5 16. f4 b4 {+0.18}) 14.
Nxc6 bxc6 15. Qxe6+ Kh8 $6{[%t Val] Z} (15... Rf7 $5 16. Qxc6 Nxc3 17. bxc3 Rb8
18. Bd5 Nb6 19. Rb1 Bd7 20. Bxf7+ Kxf7 {+1.27}) 16. Qxc6 {Seems natural, but
after Nxd4 cxd, Rfe1 Rfe8, Qxd5 Rb8, white has three pawns for the piece and
Ba5}$2{[%t Val] B} (16. Nxd5 $1 16... cxd5 17. Rfe1 Ne5 18. Qxd5 Rb8 19. dxe5
Bg4 20. Qxd8 Rfxd8 21. f3 Bf5 22. Bc3 Rxd1 23. Rxd1 Bxc2 24. Rd2 Bf5 25. exf6
Bxf6 26. Bxf6 gxf6 27. b3 {+2.63}) 16... Nxc3 17. Bxc3 Rb8 18. d5 {My computer
now prefers Black, and whilst they are materialistic beasts the position is
probably okay for Black.}$6{[%t Val] /} (18. Rfe1 $5 18... f5 19. Qe6 Bg5 20.
b3 f4 21. d5 f3 22. Bh1 Rb5 23. a4 Nf6 24. Qc6 Rxd5 25. Bxf3 Rxd1 26. Rxd1 {+0.
60}) 18... Bb7 (18... Bc5 19. b3 Rb5 {-0.11}) 19. Qe6 (19. Qa4 Bd6 20. Bd4 Qc7
21. c4 Nb6 22. Qa5 Nxd5 23. Qxc7 Nxc7 24. Ba7 Bxg2 25. Kxg2 Rb7 26. Rxd6 Rxa7
27. c5 Re8 28. Rd7 Kg8 {+0.11}) 19... Nc5 (19... Bc5 20. b4 Ba7 21. Qh3 Qe8
{-0.15}) 20. Qh3 Bc8 21. Qh5 {Bc8 is played partly to exercise control on f5 so
I can meet a future Be4 with f5 since neither g6 and h6 Qg6 would lose. Now
Black should probably try and exchange his Knight (which can always be
dislodged when needed with b4 for the Bishop on c3 with Na4). But I was still
worrying about blockading the d pawn which will wait a move or two.} 21... Bd6
22. Rd4 {Black could play g6 here.}{[%t Val] +} (22. Bd4 Bd7 23. Rfe1 Qc8 {-0.
07}) 22... Qe8 23. Qd1 $6{[%t Val] ^30 } (23. Qxe8 $5 23... Rxe8 24. Rc1 {-0.
26}) 23... Bd7 {I had intended Bf5, this was the first safe move I found, and
played it by mistake.}$6{[%t Val] 1} (23... Na4 $5 24. Re1 Nxc3 25. bxc3 Qg6
26. Bf1 f5 27. Rh4 Kg8 28. Qd4 Re8 {-0.76}) 24. Rh4 {[%t Val] (} (24. Re1 Qg6
25. Bb4 a5 26. Ba3 Rfe8 27. Rc4 Rbc8 28. b3 Rxe1+ 29. Qxe1 Qe8 30. Qxe8+ Rxe8
{-0.04}) 24... Bf5 25. b3 {The c pawn is lost this way - but Black gets a bit
carried away}$6{[%t Val] ^26 } (25. Re1 $5 25... Qg6 26. Re2 Bg4 27. f3 Bf5 28.
Rb4 Nb7 29. Ra4 Qf7 30. Kh1 {-0.37}) 25... Qg6 26. Qd2 {[%t Val] ^22 } 26...
Bxc2 $6{[%t Val] ^30 } (26... Ne4 $5 27. Bxe4 Bxe4 28. Re1 Rfe8 29. Ba5 Bf3 30.
Re3 Rxe3 31. Qxe3 Bxd5 32. Qd2 Qf5 33. Rd4 Rb5 34. c4 Rxa5 35. Rxd5 Rxd5 36.
cxd5 Kg8 37. Qe2 Kf7 38. Qxa6 Bc5 {-1.12}) 27. Rc1 Bxb3 {The move gets two
pawns for a piece, and thus restores material equilibrium, but the resulting
position is only at best equal, and Bd3 or Bf5 should be prefered. Retaining a
piece for two pawns edge.}$2{[%t Val] =} (27... Bd3 $1 28. Bb4 Rbc8 29. Rc3 Bb5
30. a4 Bd7 31. Rhc4 Nxb3 32. Rxb3 Rxc4 33. Bxd6 Rc2 34. Qe1 Re8 {-0.76}) 28.
axb3 Nxb3 29. Qc2 Qxc2 30. Rxc2 Rfc8 31. Be4 h6 32. Bf5 $6{[%t Val] 6} (32. Be1
$5 32... Rc5 33. Rxc5 Nxc5 34. Bg6 Kg8 35. Rc4 Rb5 36. Bb4 Kf8 37. Kg2 Ke7 38.
f4 Kd8 39. Bf5 Be7 {+0.41}) 32... Rc5 33. Kg2 Rxd5 {I'd looked at the obvious
white sacrifice in other line so why didn't I look this time.}$4{[%t Val] X}
(33... Bf8 $1 34. Be6 a5 35. Re4 Bd6 36. h4 Na1 37. Ra2 Rxc3 38. Rxa1 Rb2 39.
Rxa5 Rxg3+ 40. Kf1 Rb1+ 41. Re1 Rxe1+ 42. Kxe1 Bb4+ 43. Ke2 Bxa5 44. fxg3 Bc7
45. g4 g6 {+0.15}) 34. Rxh6+ gxh6 35. Bxf6+ Kg8 36. Be6+ Kf8 37. Bxd5 Nc5 38.
h4 Nd7 39. Bd4 Ne5 {[%t Val] \} 40. Re2 {[%t Val] Z} 40... Re8 {[%t Val] ^94 }
41. f4 Nf7 {A final blunder, but IM don't trade off into opposite coloured
Bishop endings which was Black's last remaining hope for a draw.} 42. Bg7+ {[%t
Val] _} 1-0

[Event "Simul"]
[Site "Clifton Road Games Exeter"]
[White "Jack Rudd"]
[Black "Simon Waters"]
[WhiteElo "0"]
[BlackElo "0"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Date "2009.04.07"]
[Round "?"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]
[Remark ""]

{[%t bLon] Game analysis^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad 
CPU   Q9550  @ 2.83GHz^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon] Engine: Rybka 3^13 ^10 }{[%t bLon]
Analysis time: 1:30:33} 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 $14 4. d4 Nf6 5. g3
{[%t Val] 2} 5... a6 {[%t Val] 8} (5... Bg4 6. Nge2 Bf3 7. Rg1 e6 8. Qd3 Qc6 9.
g4 Na6 10. Rg3 Nb4 11. Qxf3 Nxc2+ 12. Kd1 Qxf3 13. Rxf3 Nxa1 14. g5 Ng4 15. Bd2
Nxh2 {0-1, Law Steve - Smilovici Emil, IECG 18/ 8/2003 TE.2003.P. 01206}) 6.
Bf4 {[%t Val] 5} 6... Qd8 {[%t Val] B}{This can't be best! Un-develops the
queen. White has a nice lead in development and a small advantage.} (6... Qb6
$5 7. Qd3 Nc6 8. O-O-O Nb4 9. Qc4 c6 10. Bd2 a5 {+0.11}) 7. Bg2 e6 8. Nf3 Be7
9. O-O O-O 10. Qe2 {+0.48 CAP} 10... Nbd7 {N} 11. Rad1 c6 12. Ne5 {[%t Val] :}
(12. a3 h6 13. Rfe1 Qb6 14. Bc1 a5 15. Ne5 Qa6 16. Qf3 Nd5 17. Bf1 Nxe5 18.
dxe5 b5 {+0.64}) 12... Nd5 {Both sides develop logically and aim their pieces
at the centre.} 13. Bd2 {I missed the} 13... f6 $2{[%t Val] Q}{I missed the
sacrifice (SW)} (13... Nxe5 $1 14. dxe5 Qc7 15. Ne4 b5 16. f4 b4 {+0.18 With
attacks on opposite sides of the board and chances for both sides.}) 14. Nxc6
$1 (14. Nd3 {Is also good for white.}) 14... bxc6 15. Qxe6+ Kh8 {[%t Val] Z}$2
(15... Rf7 $1 16. Qxc6 Nxc3 17. bxc3 Rb8 18. Bd5 Nb6 19. Rb1 Bd7 20. Bxf7+ Kxf7
{+1.27 And black can fight on, the exchange down.}) 16. Qxc6 $2{[%t Val] B}
{Seems natural, but after Nxd4 cxd, Rfe1 Rfe8, Qxd5 Rb8, white has three pawns
for the piece and Ba5 (SW)} (16. Nxd5 $1 16... cxd5 17. Rfe1 Ne5 {! (R3)}
(17... Re8 {The more realistic choice.} 18. Qxd5 Rb8 19. Ba5 Rb6 20. Qf7 {+-}
)18. Qxd5 Rb8 19. dxe5 Bg4 20. Qxd8 Rfxd8 21. f3 Bf5 22. Bc3 Rxd1 23. Rxd1 Bxc2
24. Rd2 Bf5 25. exf6 Bxf6 26. Bxf6 gxf6 27. b3 {+2.63 And white is up two pawns
with some juicy targets.}) 16... Nxc3 17. Bxc3 Rb8 18. d5 {[%t Val] /}{?! (R3)
My computer now prefers Black, and whilst they are materialistic beasts the
position is probably okay for Black. (SW)} (18. Rfe1 f5 19. Qe6 Bg5 20. b3 f4
21. d5 f3 22. Bh1 Rb5 23. a4 Nf6 24. Qc6 Rxd5 25. Bxf3 Rxd1 26. Rxd1 {+0. 60})
18... Bb7 19. Qe6 Nc5 (19... Bc5 20. b4 Ba7 21. Qh3 Qe8 {-0.15}) 20. Qh3 Bc8
21. Qh5 {Bc8 is played partly to exercise control on f5 so I can meet a future
Be4 with f5 since neither g6 and h6 Qg6 would lose. Now Black should probably
try and exchange his Knight (which can always be dislodged when needed with b4
for the Bishop on c3 with Na4). But I was still worrying about blockading the d
pawn which will wait a move or two.} 21... Bd6 22. Rd4 {Black could play g6
here.}{[%t Val] +} (22. Bd4 Bd7 23. Rfe1 Qc8 {-0. 07}) 22... Qe8 {This all
seems good from black, get rid of the queen and blockade the pawn! (IR)} 23.
Qd1 $6{[%t Val] ^30 } (23. Qxe8 $5 23... Rxe8 24. Rc1 {-0. 26}) 23... Bd7
$6{[%t Val] 1}{I had intended Bf5, this was the first safe move I found, and
played it by mistake. (SW)} (23... Na4 $5 24. Re1 Nxc3 25. bxc3 Qg6 26. Bf1 f5
27. Rh4 Kg8 28. Qd4 Re8 {-0.76})(23... Bf5 $15{ (IR)}) 24. Rh4 {[%t Val] (}
(24. Re1 Qg6 25. Bb4 a5 26. Ba3 Rfe8 27. Rc4 Rbc8 28. b3 Rxe1+ 29. Qxe1 Qe8 30.
Qxe8+ Rxe8 {-0.04}) 24... Bf5 25. b3 {The c pawn is lost this way - but Black
gets a bit carried away}$6{[%t Val] ^26 } (25. Re1 $5 25... Qg6 26. Re2 Bg4 27.
f3 Bf5 28. Rb4 Nb7 29. Ra4 Qf7 30. Kh1 {-0.37}) 25... Qg6 26. Qd2 Bxc2 {[%t
Val] ^30 } (26... Ne4 {!? Getting rid of white's bishop-pair.} 27. Bxe4 Bxe4
28. Re1 Rfe8 29. Ba5 Bf3 (29... Bxc2 $17{ (IR)})30. Re3 Rxe3 31. Qxe3 Bxd5 32.
Qd2 Qf5 33. Rd4 Rb5 34. c4 Rxa5 35. Rxd5 Rxd5 36. cxd5 Kg8 37. Qe2 Kf7 38. Qxa6
Bc5 {-1.12 Is the amazing variation given by Rybka. I leave it to you to decide
what's going on! (IR)}) 27. Rc1 Bxb3 $2{[%t Val] =}{The move gets two pawns for
a piece, and thus restores material equilibrium, but the resulting position is
only at best equal, and Bd3 or Bf5 should be prefered. Retaining a piece for
two pawns edge. (SW)^13 ^10 }{A typical Simon-sac (IR). You're often keen to
sac material when down positionally (I've never seen anyone sac so many
exhanges and go onto win the ensuing lost endgame!) Perhaps you were a little
keen here as you rightly say, but it's not so bad.} (27... Bd3 $1 28. Bb4 Rbc8
29. Rc3 Bb5 30. a4 Bd7 31. Rhc4 Nxb3 32. Rxb3 Rxc4 33. Bxd6 Rc2 34. Qe1 Re8
{-0.76}) 28. axb3 Nxb3 29. Qc2 Qxc2 30. Rxc2 Rfc8 31. Be4 h6 32. Bf5 $6{[%t
Val] 6} (32. Be1 $5 32... Rc5 33. Rxc5 Nxc5 34. Bg6 Kg8 35. Rc4 Rb5 36. Bb4 Kf8
37. Kg2 Ke7 38. f4 Kd8 39. Bf5 Be7 {+0.41}) 32... Rc5 33. Kg2 Rxd5 $4{[%t Val]
X}{I'd looked at the obvious white sacrifice in other line so why didn't I look
this time. (SW) You mean overlooked?(IR)} (33... Bf8 $1 34. Be6 a5 35. Re4 Bd6
36. h4 Na1 37. Ra2 Rxc3 38. Rxa1 Rb2 39. Rxa5 Rxg3+ 40. Kf1 Rb1+ 41. Re1 Rxe1+
42. Kxe1 Bb4+ 43. Ke2 Bxa5 44. fxg3 Bc7 45. g4 g6 {+0.15}) 34. Rxh6+ $1 34...
gxh6 35. Bxf6+ {What fantastic bishops white has!} 35... Kg8 36. Be6+ Kf8 37.
Bxd5 Nc5 38. h4 Nd7 39. Bd4 Ne5 {[%t Val] \} 40. Re2 {[%t Val] Z} 40... Re8
{[%t Val] ^94 } 41. f4 {Another example of JR harassing his opponent's knights
with pawns. (IR)} 41... Nf7 {A final blunder, but IMs don't trade off into
opposite coloured Bishop endings which was Black's last remaining hope for a
draw. (SW) I'm not sure which ending you mean? RxR BxN is same coloured
bishops. (IR)} 42. Bg7+ {[%t Val] _}{! A very unbalanced game which wasn't
badly conducted by black. Overlooking the second sacrifice was fatal though. I
feel Simon shouldn't be so hard on himself positionally, it's the tactics that
were wrong.  (IR)} (42. Rxe8+ Kxe8 43. Bxf7+ {? With excellent drawing chances
for black. Is this what you meant?} 43... Kxf7) 42... Kxg7 43. Rxe8 1-0

At a more general level, I think I'd say that we made Jack's life easier by often playing too passively in the opening (Simon, Brian, Sean, Jonathan, John...).Where we stood our ground and played for some concrete goals (Richard, Tim and very nearly Dan) I was more optimistic.

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