Junior Club Posters

  1. The Basics
    1. in the opening...
    2. in the middle-game...
    3. in the ending...
  2. Winning a won game...
    1. If you are ahead:
    2. If you are behind:
  3. Apparently good things to be able to say:
  4. The Nine Bad Moves (Reinfeld 1954)...
    1. Neglecting Development Of Your Pieces
    2. Exposing Your King To Attack
    3. Making Too Many Queen Moves In The Opening
    4. Grabbing Pawns Thoughtlessly
    5. Weakening Your Castled Position
    6. Getting Pinned
    7. Failing To Guard Against Captures
    8. Underestimating Your Opponent's Threats
    9. Losing A Won Game
  5. Defending against an attack...
    1. Avoid
    2. Block
    3. Capture
    4. Defend
  6. Tick and triangle method
    1. Basic tick method
    2. Triangle method for opponent's threats
    3. Example
    4. Extended tick and triangle method
    5. Perfect Play Score Sheet

The Basics

in the opening...

  • get your minor pieces out towards the centre
  • get at least a share of the centre
  • get your king into safety by castling

tSlDjLsT
XxXxXxXx
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PpB-+
+-Pb+n+-
pP-N-PpP
R-+qR-K-

in the middle-game...

  • use space and open lines to attack the enemy king and other targets
  • when you are winning, swap off pieces (but not pawns)

-+tD-Tj+
+-+lLxXx
x+s+x+-+
+xX-P-Nb
-+-P-+-+
P-Pq+nR-
-P-+-+pP
+-+-+rK-

in the ending...

  • attack and win enemy pawns
  • move your own pawns up as fast as possible to become queens
  • get your King Up For The Ending (KUFTE)

-T-J-+-+
L-+-+-+x
x+-+xRpS
+xX-P-Tp
-+-+k+-+
+-+-+-+-
pP-+-N-R
+-+-+-+-


Winning a won game...

...not as hard as winning a lost one.

If you are ahead:

Don't relax

  Keep things under control

  Swap pieces off

  Leave pawns on

If you are behind:

Don't give up

  Try and get some counterplay

  Swap off pawns, not pieces

 


Apparently good things to be able to say:

...but your opponent might be thinking:

My opponent played the opening badly, I can't be in any danger...
I made a bit of a mess of the start, now I've got to try really hard...
I can't see the point in my opponent's last move, so I'll carry on anyhow...
Now as long as my opponent doesn't think for too long he may miss my idea...
My opponent is weak so I don't need to try too hard...
Well, I may be expected to lose this but I'm going to try as hard as I can to win!
This is a pretty normal position, I'll play something quickly...
If my opponent isn't careful, I've got something lined up against the natural move
Nothing much is going on, anything will do...
Things are just starting to look good - just give me one more move and...
I'm winning this easily, so I'll just play a normal move...
Oh dear, I'm losing, only one hope left...
I can't think of anything else so I'll castle ...
If only he would castle...
I feel a bit vulnerable so I'll castle...
I reckon his King is safer where it is, because if my opponent castles, then...
I'll just swap everything off to get a draw...
If we have a general swap-off on e5, the only pieces left in good positions will be mine...
The only thing going on in this position is X...
Obviously the main thing going on here is X, but I have got Y up my sleeve...
I'll do A, then B, then C, and I should be winning... I'll just play this quickly than have another think later.
If my opponent does A,B and C, that looks really good but of course I can go D straightaway after all that.
I'll do A, then B, then C, and I should be winning... I'll just play this quickly than have another think later.
If my opponent does A,B and C I'm lost, so if he does A, I'll have to go Z so B doesn't work.
My attack looks terrific, my opponent can't do anything...
My opponent has a terrific attack coming, I'd better prepare something special in reply.
I don't know why my opponent is carrying on, I'm about to win this... any move will do...
I should resign but I have got one trick left...
Thank goodness that's over, now I can relax...
Well, that was all very interesting, but I've now got this....

Genuinely good things to say to yourself:

I'd better watch it!

  I've seen something like this before, but what are the differences?

  Have I come to this conclusion too quickly?

  How could I lose?

  Did I stop examining this variation too soon?

  We've both been playing normal-looking moves, but is there anything hidden?

  What might my opponent try?

  Not every move that looks good, is good - what might be wrong with it?

  My opponent must have a plan and should be trying to win somehow...

  That looks pretty harmless, but let's have a quick check...

  Every position can be ruined, what might go wrong here?

  My opponent has just sighed as though he's given up... perhaps he's set a trap!

 


The Nine Bad Moves (Reinfeld 1954)...

...and so, nine good pieces of advice:

Neglecting Development Of Your Pieces

get your pieces out towards the centre as fast as you can

Exposing Your King To Attack

get your king into safety in the opening by castling

Making Too Many Queen Moves In The Opening

move each piece only once in the opening; keep your queen and rooks out of the way of the opponent's pieces at the start

Grabbing Pawns Thoughtlessly

get your pieces out towards the centre as fast as you can; don't waste time grabbing pawns until you have completed your development

Weakening Your Castled Position

get your king into safety by castling and keep it strong and guarded

Getting Pinned

Failing To Guard Against Captures

look out for your opponent's threats

Underestimating Your Opponent's Threats

Losing A Won Game

look out for your opponent's threats, even if you think you are winning easily

Defending against an attack...

...is as easy as ABCD.

Avoid

Move your piece out of the way.

  1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 c6 4. Nf3 d5 threat 5...dxc4.

  Avoid with 5. Bb3

Block

Put a piece or pawn between the attacked piece and the attacker.

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 threat 5. Nxf7
Block with 4...d5

Capture

Capture the attacking piece.

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 threat 5...dxc4.
Capture the attacker with 5. exd5

Defend

Support the attacked piece or pawn.

  1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 threat 3. Nxe5.
Defend the pawn with 2...Nc6.


Tick and triangle method

Michael Basman, "From Beginner to Winner in Two Months"

Basic tick method

1. Choose a move

  2. Write it down

  3. Ask "Is it safe? (or safe enough)"

  4. Tick (/)and play or go back to 1.

Triangle method for opponent's threats

1. Write down opponent's move

  2. Ask "Is it a threat?"

  3a. If yes, put a triangle (/\)after your opponent's move and run through ABCD to choose a move.

  3b. If no, just choose a move as you normally would.

Example

White: A. Junior Black: B. Junior

 

1. e2-e4   / e7-e5
2. Ng1-f3 / Nb8-c6
3. Bf1-c4 / Bf8-c5
4. Nf3-g5 / d7-d5 /\
5. e4xd5 / Nc6-a5 /\
6. Bc4-b5+ / c7-c6
7.
8.
9.
10.

From Black's side:

1. e2-e4      e7-e5  /
2. Ng1-f3 /\ Nb8-c6 /
3. Bf1-c4 Bf8-c5 /
4. Nf3-g5 /\ d7-d5 /
5. e4xd5 Nc6-a5 /
6. Bc4-b5+ c7-c6 /
7.
8.
9.

Extended tick and triangle method

Safe move

  /-

  Safe enough move

  //-

  Safe threat

  / /\

  Safe enough threat

  // /\

  Unsafe move

  x-

  Unsafe threat

  x /\

  Use for both your moves and your opponent's moves.

 


Perfect Play Score Sheet

   Move    Captures   Opponent's   Safety   My threats  My move     Check    
Threats
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

legacy nid: 

48

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