Playing Black against Queen's-Pawn Openings (1) Cambridge Springs

White plays 1. d4 or plays one of the flank openings, and you reply with either a solid or an aggressive system
Black's basic solid set-up
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-np+p+-
ppp+n+pp
r-bkqb+r
Black's basic active set-up
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+p+p+-+
+-np+p+-
pp-bn+pp
+kr-qb+r
  An Exeter Junior Chess Club booklet Edition 1., December, 99

 

Bibliography:

Norwood, Trends in the King's Indian Attack

Evans, The Chess Opening for You

Kasparov/Keene, Batsford Chess Openings 2

Walker, Chess Openings for Juniors

Varnusz, Play Anti-Indian Systems

Wall, 500 English Miniatures

Soltis, The London System

Botvinnik, 100 Selected Games

Schiller, The Cambridge Springs Defence

Polugaevsky, Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defence

Various magazines and other books   Contents

Introduction

Playing solidly against the Queen's-side and flank openings

Playing aggressively against the Queen's-side and flank openings  

The repertoires below offer you solid and aggressive ways of playing against most of the Queen's side openings, and also tells you what to do against some of the less common lines where only one line need be learned.

Playing solidly against the Queen's-side and flank openings

Black's basic solid set-up
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-np+p+-
ppp+n+pp
r-bkqb+r

When I say solid, I mean, solid and going forward, not solid and standing still.

So, you must plan where your counterplay is coming from:

­ play ...e5 to get your Bc8 out and working

­ play ...Bd6 and ...Qc7

­ play ...Bb4 and ...Qa5

­ play ...dxc4 and ...b5

Of course you can combine these plans.

play ...e5 to get your Bc8 out
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-pp+-+
+-n-+p+-
ppp+n+pp
r-bkqb+r
play ...Bd6 and ...Qc7
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-npbp+-
ppp+nqpp
r-+k+b+r
play ...Bb4 and ...Qa5
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-b-
-+-+p+-q
+-np+p+-
ppp+n+pp
r-+k+b+r
...dxc4 & ...b5: keep the P/ hit a Bc4
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+p+
+-np+p+-
ppp+n+-p
r-bkqb+r

 

 

 
Playing aggressively against the Queen's-side and flank openings




play ...Qe8 and ...Qh4
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
q+p+p+-+
+-np+p+-
pp-bn+pp
+kr-+b+r
play ...Kh8, ...Rg8 and ...g5
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
qpp+p+-+
+-np+p+-
p+-bn+pp
kr+-+b+r
play ...Ne4 and ...Ndf6
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+n+-+-
-+p+p+-+
+-np+p+-
pp-b-+pp
+kr-qb+r
re-organise bishops ...Bd6 / ...Bd7-e8-h4
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
b+p+p+-+
+-npbp+-
pp-+n+pp
+kr-q-+r

 

Under the Section A, Queen Pawn Openings you can see both these lines at work. You can see straight away that it may be possible to head towards one then choose the other.

I'll also show you how to play against some of the more off-beat approaches to playing White in sections B-F. Analysis and Games

 

I'll go through each approach in turn, looking at a system to play against each White opening.

A. Queen's pawn openings

As your chess improves you will meet more and more players who prefer the slower Queen's-side openings, which although slow, are dangerous because they are also trying to take over the centre, and it is harder to stop this than after 1. e4. The reason for this is worth thinking about:

In the e4 openings, you can often easily play ...d5, but in the 1. d4 openings, ...e5 takes a lot longer to arrange. You may prefer to give up on the idea for a while, and concentrate on active development.

There are several systems below which combine solidity and winning chances in varying proportions:

The Cambridge Springs Defence to the Queen's Gambit Declined

The Semi-Slav Defence: the Tchigorin, Romih and Abrahams variations

The Stonewall Dutch

 

 

A1 Playing solidly against 1. d4

I assume that White will follow 1...d5 with 2. c4. Sometimes White will play 2. Nf3 and later 3. c4, but basically White usually needs the c2-c4 move to put Black's centre under pressure, or Black will be able to use the c7 and e7 pawns to hit out at the d4 pawn. There are a few White systems that don't involve c2-c4:

*

The Stonewall System

1. d4 2. e3 3. Bd3 and 4. f4

*

The London System

1. d4 2. Nf3 3. Bf4

*

The Colle System

: 1. d4 2. Nf3 3. e3 4. Bd3 ( see the booklet devoted to this opening

 

 

A(a) The Stonewall System

(Notes from Fine, 1943)

1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Bd3

[3. f4 is sometimes played to avoid the 3...Nc6 line. Black can always play ...Bf5]

3... c5

[Another good system is 3... Nc6 4. f4

[4. c3 e5]

4... Nb4 5. Nf3 Nxd3+ 6. cxd3 g6 7. Nc3 Bg7 8. O-O O-O=]

4. c3 Nc6 5. f4

r+bqkb-r
pp+-pppp
-+n+-n-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-P-P-+
+-PBP-+-
PP-+-+PP
RNBQK-NR

5... e6

blocks the Bc8; probably not best.

[5... Bg4 6. Nf3 e6 7. Nbd2 Bd6 8. h3 Bh5 9. b3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Rc8
-+rqk+-r
pp+-+ppp
-+nbpn-+
+-+p+-+b
-+-P-P-+
+P+BPN+P
P+-N-+P+
R-BQK-+R

Black is comfortable]

The dangers in this line can be seen in this line, given by Fine:

6. Nf3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. Ne5 Qc7

Ne5 needs some response; Black could also try to occupy e4

9. Nd2 Re8 10. g4

r+b+r+k+
ppq-+ppp
-+nbpn-+
+-ppN-+-
-+-P-PP+
+-PBP-+-
PP-N-+-P
R-BQ+RK-

with a crushing attack

 

 

A(b) London System

This can be a dangerous system: e.g.

Pribyl - Penrose (Nice) 1974

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. c3 e6 5. e3 Be7 6. Nbd2 O-O 7. Bd3 b6 8. Ne5

[8. O-O Bb7 9. a4

[9. Ne5]]

8... Bb7 9. Qf3 Nc6 10. Qh3 g6 11. Bh6 Re8 12. f4 Nd7

[12... Nxe5 13. fxe5 Ne4 14. Bxe4 dxe4 15. O-O with a strong attack: White can contemplate Rxf7!]

13. O-O f5 14. Ndf3 Ncxe5 15. fxe5 Bf8 16. Ng5 Bxh6 17. Qxh6 Nf8

[17... Qe7 18. g4 Qg7 19. Qxg7+ Kxg7 20. Bb5 Rad8 21. gxf5 gxf5 22. Nh3 with an endgame plus]

18. Rf3 Re7 19. g4 Rg7 20. Raf1 Qd7 21. Kh1 Qe7 22. h4 Bc8 23. Rg3 a5 24. Rfg1 Ra7

-+b+-nk+
r-+-q-rp
-p-+p+pQ
p-ppPpN-
-+-P-+PP
+-PBP-R-
PP-+-+-+
+-+-+-RK

Black fiddles while the King's side burns... White won an endgame in about 40 moves.

 

Let's try again from the top:

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 c5 4. c3 e6 5. e3 Be7 6. Nbd2

Now 6... Nc6

r+bqk+-r
pp+-bppp
-+n+pn-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-P-B-+
+-P-PN+-
PP-N-PPP
R-+QKB+R

Black should be prepared to snap off a Knight coming to e5, and can also think about ...Nh5 to exchange the Bishop.

7. h3

[or 7. Bd3 Nh5 8. Be5 f6 9. Bg3 g6 10. Qe2 O-O

r+bq-rk+
pp+-b-+p
-+n+ppp+
+-pp+-+n
-+-P-+-+
+-PBPNB-
PP-NQPPP
R-+-K-+R

Eslon-Cramling, 1984. BCO confidently gives this as an edge to Black. The Black pawns look odd but cover a lot of key squares. If White castles King's- side Black will play ...Nxg3; if O-O-O Black should not open a file but ...a6.]

7... O-O 8. Bd3 b6 9. O-O Bb7 10. Ne5 Nxe5 11. Bxe5 c4 12. Bc2 b5 13. a3 Nd7

r+-q-rk+
pb+nbppp
-+-+p+-+
+p+pB-+-
-+pP-+-+
P-P-P-+P
-PBN-PP+
R-+Q+RK-

= Remon-Agzamov 1984

 

 

The only other system which may cause concentr is the Colle System; early development of the Bc8 to f5 or g4 is the antidote (see booklet).

 

White has other non-standard plans eg...

[3. g3 c5 4. Bg2 e6 5. O-O Nc6 6. c3 Qb6 7. e3 Bd6

r+b+k+-r
pp+-+ppp
-qnbpn-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-P-PNP-
PP-+-PBP
RNBQ+RK-

= Ardiansyah-Farago 1983.]

....but these should not cause you sleepless nights. The strongest move is c2-c4, so let us look at these variations.

 

A1.1 The Cambridge Springs Defence against the Queen's Gambit

The Queen's Gambit is a strong and solid approach for White.

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5

The main line is 4...Be7 but the line I recommend starts:

4... Nbd7

r+bqkb-r
pppn+ppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-N-+-+-
PP-+PPPP
R-+QKBNR

Can White win a pawn here?

[5. cxd5 exd5 6. Nxd5 Nxd5 7. Bxd8

[7. Bd2 N7f6]

7... Bb4+ 8. Qd2 Bxd2+ 9. Kxd2 Kxd8 and Black has an extra piece!]

No, so White usually continues:

5. e3 c6 6. Nf3 Qa5

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+QKB+R

This is the Cambridge Springs Defence, a counter-attacking line where Black aims to put the White Queen's-side under pressure. White has ways of heading off to other variations on moves 4,5 and 6 and we will look at those later. First, let us look at an example game:

Marshall,F - Tarrasch,S, Nuremberg, 1895

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 c6 6. Qc2 Qa5

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-N-P-+-
PPQ+-PPP
R-+-KBNR

7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Nf3 ? 8... Bb4 9. Kd2

r+b+k+-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-b-P-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PPQK-PPP
R-+-+B+R

Black's attack on c3 has given White a real headache.

9... c5 10. a3 Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 cxd4 12. exd4 N7b6 13. Bd3 Bd7 14. Rhc1 Rc8 15. Qb3 O-O

-+r+-rk+
pp+b+ppp
-n-+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-+-P-+-+
PQPB+N+-
-+-K-PPP
R-R-+-+-

16. Ke2

[16. Rc2 Ba4]

16... Rxc3 17. Rxc3 Qxc3 18. Qb1 h6 19. Bd2 Qc7 20. Kf1 Nc4 21. Bc1 Ba4 22. Qa2 Rc8 23. Qe2 Nc3 24. Qe1 Na5 25. Bxh6 Nb3 26. Bd2 Nxa1 27. Qxa1

-+r+-+k+
ppq-+pp-
-+-+p+-+
+-+-+-+-
b+-P-+-+
P-nB+N+-
-+-B-PPP
Q-+-+K+-

27... Bb5 28. Bxb5 Nxb5 29. g3 Qc6 30. Kg2

-+r+-+k+
pp+-+pp-
-+q+p+-+
+n+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
P-+-+NP-
-+-B-PKP
Q-+-+-+-

30... Rd8 31. Be3 Qe4 32. Qb2 Rd5 33. a4 Nd6 34. Bf4 Nf5 35. Be3 Nxe3+ 36. fxe3 Qxe3 37. g4 f5 38. g5 Qe4 39. Qc3 f4 40. Qc8+ Kh7 41. Qc3

-+-+-+-+
pp+-+-pk
-+-+p+-+
+-+r+-P-
P+-Pqp-+
+-Q-+N+-
-+-+-+KP
+-+-+-+-

41... e5 42. h4 Rxd4 43. g6+ Kh6 44. Kh2 Qe2+ 0-1

Quite a long haul, but not difficult to understand. I predict you will win a few games like this to White players who do not really see the attack coming. All the theory below is designed to give you enough ideas to see you through games where your opponents do know what they are doing.

From the main line position:

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+QKB+R

White has several different moves here, but the same ideas are present in each line: White hopes to safeguard the bishop on g5 and/or to minimise the attack on c3. We will look at:

a. 7. Nd2, stopping ...Ne4

b. 7. Bxf6, removing the target

c. 7. Bd3 - a poor move (...dxc4!)

d. 7. cxd5 - stopping ...dxc4

The first and last of these are the most important and most common amongst masters.

 

 

A1.1a Cambridge Springs with 7. Nd2

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-N-P-+-
PP-N-PPP
R-+QKB+R

Black has got two ways to try and equalise here I recommend 7. Nd2 Bb4 but Black has also tried

7.Nd2 dxc4

e.g.

8. Bxf6 Nxf6 9. Nxc4 Qc7 10. Rc1

r+b+kb-r
ppq-+ppp
-+p+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+NP-+-+
+-N-P-+-
PP-+-PPP
+-RQKB+R

which may be about equal but I don't fancy it as well. Let's try instead

7. Nd2 Bb4

8. Qc2 O-O

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-bPP-+-+
+-N-P-+-
PPQN-PPP
R-+-KB+R

[8... e5 also equalises according to Polugaevsky]

9. Be2

White has also tried:

[9. a3 Ne4]

[9. Bh4 e5

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-n-+
q-+pp-+-
-bPP-+-B
+-N-P-+-
PPQN-PPP
R-+-KB+R

always this blow! But Black can also try

[9... c5 10. Nb3 Qa4 11. Bxf6 Nxf6 12. dxc5 Qc6 13. cxd5 exd5=]

r+b+-rk+
pp+-+ppp
-+q+-n-+
+-Pp+-+-
-b-+-+-+
+NN-P-+-
PPQ+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

10. dxe5

[10. Nb3 Qc7 11. Be2 [or 11. Bg3 Ne4] 11... dxc4 12. Bxc4 exd4 13. Nxd4 Ne5 = Straat-Spielmann, Scheveningen 1923]

10... Ne4 11. Ndxe4 dxe4 12. e6 Ne5 13. exf7+

[13. e7 Re8 14. O-O-O Ng6 15. Rd8 Bf5]

13... Rxf7 14. O-O-O Bf5 15. a3 Nd3+

r+-+-+k+
pp+-+rpp
-+p+-+-+
q-+-+b+-
-bP+p+-B
P-NnP-+-
-PQ+-PPP
+-KR+B+R

16. Bxd3

[16. Kb1 Bxc3 17. Qxc3 Qxc3 18. bxc3 Re8 with good compensation for the piece]

16... exd3 17. Qd2 c5 18. axb4 ? 18... cxb4 19. Nb1 Rc8 20. b3 b5 with a strong attack for the piece]

9... e5

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-n-+
q-+pp-B-
-bPP-+-+
+-N-P-+-
PPQNBPPP
R-+-K-+R

10. O-O

Again White has tried other moves:

[10. dxe5 Ne4 11. Ndxe4 dxe4 12. O-O Bxc3 13. bxc3 Nxe5

[13... f6 14. Bh4 Qxe5 =]

14. Qxe4 Ng6 15. Bf4 Nxf4 16. Qxf4 Qxc3

r+b+-rk+
pp+-+ppp
-+p+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+P+-Q-+
+-q-P-+-
P+-+BPPP
R-+-+RK-

is OK for Black]

[10. Bxf6 Nxf6 11. dxe5 Ne4 12. Ndxe4

[12. cxd5! Nxc3 13. bxc3 Bxc3 14. Rc1 Bxe5 15. dxc6 Rd8 16. Bd3 bxc6 17. O-O Ba6 18. Nc4 Bxc4 19. Bxc4 += bukic-nikolac, yugoslavia 1976]

12... dxe4 13. O-O Bxc3 14. Qxc3 Qxc3

15. bxc3 Re8 16. Rad1 Kf8

r+b+rk-+
pp+-+ppp
-+p+-+-+
+-+-P-+-
-+P+p+-+
+-P-P-+-
P+-+BPPP
+-+R+RK-

]

10... Bd6

[10... exd4 11. Nb3 Qc7 12. Nxd4 dxc4 13. Bxc4 Ne5 14. Be2 Neg4 15. Bf4 Qe7 16. h3 Ne5 17. Rad1 Ng6 18. Bg3 Rd8 = Spraggett-Saed, Taxco 1985]

11. Nb3

[11. cxd5 exd4 12. dxc6 dxc3 13. cxd7 cxd2 14. dxc8=Q Raxc8]

[11. c5 Be7 12. b4 Qc7

r+b+-rk+
ppqnbppp
-+p+-n-+
+-Ppp-B-
-P-P-+-+
+-N-P-+-
P+QNBPPP
R-+-+RK-

with chances for both sides; White has more space but while Black maintains the tension in the centre it will not be easy for either side

(...e4, though, would be a mistake) 13. b5]

11... Qc7 =

r+b+-rk+
ppqn+ppp
-+pb-n-+
+-+pp-B-
-+PP-+-+
+NN-P-+-
PPQ+BPPP
R-+-+RK-

 

A1.1b Cambridge Springs with 7. Bxf6

7...Nxf6 8. Bd3 Bb4 9. Qc2

[There is an old line 9. Qb3 dxc4 10. Bxc4 O-O 11. O-O Bxc3 12. bxc3 b6 13. Ne5 Bb7 14. Be2 c5 15. Nc4 Qa6 16. Qb2 Bd5 17. Ne5 Qc8 18. a4 Nd7 19. c4 Be4

r+q+-rk+
p-+n+ppp
-p-+p+-+
+-p-N-+-
P+PPb+-+
+-+-P-+-
-Q-+BPPP
R-+-+RK-

= Capablanca, Lasker,Ed. NY 1924]

9... c5

r+b+k+-r
pp+-+ppp
-+-+pn-+
q-pp+-+-
-bPP-+-+
+-NBPN+-
PPQ+-PPP
R-+-K-+R

Black has a simple equalising plan: exchange centre pawns, castle, then develop your Bc8.

10. Nd2 [or 10. O-O] 10... cxd4 11. exd4 Bxc3 12. Qxc3 Qxc3 13. bxc3 dxc4 14. Nxc4 Ke7 15. Kd2 Bd7

r+-+-+-r
pp+bkppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+NP-+-+
+-PB+-+-
P+-K-PPP
R-+-+-+R

= Kmoch-Vajda, Kecsemet 1927

A1.1c Cambridge Springs with 7. Bd3

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
+-NBPN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+QK-+R

This is a feeble move, although it looks natural.

7... Ne4 8. Nd2

[8. Bf4 Nxc3 9. bxc3 Qxc3+ 10. Kf1 dxc4]

[8. Bxe4 dxe4 9. Ne5 Bb4]

8... Nxd2 9. Qxd2 dxc4

And Black has won a piece.

 

 

A1.1d Main line Cambridge with 7. cxd5

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+P+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+QKB+R

7...Nxd5

Now White usually plays Qd2 but first we will need to examine an alternative in 8. Qb3.

 

A1.1d(a) White deviates from main line: 8. Qb3

8. Qb3 Bb4

Others can be confidently tried:

[8... h6 9. Bh4 Bb4 10. Rc1 c5 11. a3 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 cxd4 13. exd4 O-O = Euwe-Capablanca 1931]

[8... Bd6 9. e4 Nxc3 10. bxc3 e5 11. Bd2 O-O 12. Bd3 Qc7 = Peev-Atanasov, Varna 1974]

9. Rc1 e5

r+b+k+-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-+-+
q-+np-B-
-b-P-+-+
+QN-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
+-R-KB+R

!? Tartakower

10. Bc4 !

Best. Alternatives include:

(a) [10. dxe5 Nc5 11. Qc2 Na4

[11... Qxa2]

]

(b) [10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. dxe5 Be6 12. a3 Nxc3 13. Qxb4

[13. axb4 Qxe5 14. Bf4 Bxb3 15. Bxe5 Na2]

13... Qxb4 14. axb4 Na2 15. Rd1 Nxb4]

(c) [10. Bd3 h6 11. Bh4 exd4 12. exd4 Nf4]

...with Black comfortable in each case.

10... N7b6

[10... exd4 is more solid 11. Bxd5 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 cxd5 13. exd4 O-O 14. O-O Nb6 =]

11. Bxd5 Nxd5 12. Nxe5 Be6 13. Nc4

[13. a3 Nxc3]

13... Nxc3 14. Nxa5 Nxa2+ 15. Qxb4 Nxb4 16. Kd2 f6

r+-+k+-r
pp+-+-pp
-+p+bp-+
N-+-+-B-
-n-P-+-+
+-+-P-+-
-P-K-PPP
+-R-+-+R

=/=+ As in a consultation game Euwe & Weenink - Alekhin & Van Den Bosch, Amsterdam 1931

 

 
A1.1d(b) Back to the main line with 8. Qd2

8. Qd2

Black now has the sharp

8... N7b6

and the solid

8...Bb4

 

A1.1d-1 Main line with 8... N7b6

Now White has a choice:

(1) 9. Bd3

(2) 9. Nxd5

(3) 9. a3

(4) 9. Rc1

Only the last of these is dangerous.

 

d-1(1) Main line with 8...N7b6 9. Bd3

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+ppp
-np+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-NBPN+-
PP-Q-PPP
R-+-K-+R

9. Bd3 (?)

This move anticipates transposing to the Rc1 system after

9... Nxc3

but Black can dodge with

9... Na4 !

with no problems after

10. Nxd5

[or 10. Nxa4 Bb4]

[or 10. O-O Nxb2 11. Qxb2 Qxc3 -+]

10... Qxd2+ 11. Kxd2 exd5 drawn: Adorjan-Ivkov 1980

This is worth knowing about, because it is not in all the books.

 

d-1(2) Main line with 8...N7b6 9. Nxd5

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+ppp
-np+p+-+
q-+N+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-+-PN+-
PP-Q-PPP
R-+-KB+R

An attempt to avoid any theoretical novelties, but abandining any pretence at keeping the White advantage.

9... Qxd2+ 10. Nxd2 exd5 11. Bd3 a5

r+b+kb-r
+p+-+ppp
-np+-+-+
p-+p+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-+BP-+-
PP-N-PPP
R-+-K-+R

= Karpov-Kasparov 1984/85 #47

 

d-1(3) Main line with 8...N7b6 9. a3

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+ppp
-np+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-+-P-+-+
P-N-PN+-
-P-Q-PPP
R-+-KB+R

9... Nxc3

the pawn grab with ...Bb4 is rather risky

10. Qxc3

[10. bxc3 Nd5 11. e4

[11. c4 Bb4]

11... Qxc3]

10... Qxc3+ 11. bxc3 f6 12. Bh4 c5

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+-pp
-n-+pp-+
+-p-+-+-
-+-P-+-B
P-P-PN+-
-+-+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

= Euwe

 

d-1(4) Main line with 8...N7b6 9. Rc1

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+ppp
-np+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-Q-PPP
+-R-KB+R

9... Nxc3 10. bxc3 Nd5 11. Bc4

[11. Bd3 Nxc3 12. O-O Bb4 13. a3 Qxa3 transposes above]

11... Nxc3

[11... Ba3 12. Rb1 Nxc3 13. Rb3 b5 14. Bd3 b4 Black can win a pawn but the Ba3 is dead for a long while]

12. O-O b5

[12... Bb4 is risky 13. a3]

13. d5

This is the only threatening continuation

[13. Qxc3 Qxc3 14. Rxc3 bxc4 15. Rb1 Ba6 16. Nd2 c5

r+-+kb-r
p-+-+ppp
b+-+p+-+
+-p-+-B-
-+pP-+-+
+-R-P-+-
P+-N-PPP
+R+-+-K-

with better chances for Black]

13... exd5 14. Bxd5 cxd5 15. Rxc3 Bb4 16. Qxd5 O-O 17. Qxa8 Bg4

Q+-+-rk+
p-+-+ppp
-+-+-+-+
qp+-+-B-
-b-+-+b+
+-R-PN+-
P+-+-PPP
+-+-+RK-

Black's chances are no worse

 

 

A1.1d-2 Main line with 8... Bb4

this more straightforward move leads to quieter play

9. Rc1 O-O

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+p+p+-+
q-+n+-B-
-b-P-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-Q-PPP
+-R-KB+R

10. e4

[10. Bd3 e5 11. dxe5

[11. O-O exd4 12. exd4 f6 13. Bh4 Rd8 14. a3 Bxc3 15. bxc3 Nf8 16. Bg3 Be6 17. Rfe1 Bf7 18. c4

r+-r-nk+
pp+-+bpp
-+p+-p-+
q-+n+-+-
-+PP-+-+
P-+B+NB-
-+-Q-PPP
+-R-R-K-

with a pull for White: Kasparov-Smyslov, 1984]

11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Ba3 13. Rd1 Nxe5]

10... Nxc3 11. bxc3 Bd6

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+pbp+-+
q-+-+-B-
-+-PP+-+
+-P-+N+-
P+-Q-PPP
+-R-KB+R

 

[11... Ba3 12. Rb1 e5

r+b+-rk+
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-+-+
q-+-p-B-
-+-PP+-+
b-P-+N+-
P+-Q-PPP
+R+-KB+R

Walker 13. Bd3 Re8

[13... exd4 14. cxd4 Qxd2+ 15. Nxd2 Nb6 16. O-O Be6 17. Nb3 += Polu]

14. O-O b6 15. Qe2 Bb7 16. Rfd1 += Euwe]

 

This is all the theory you will ever need if White allows the Cambridge Springs. Play over each line, not to learn the moves by heart but to see all the different ideas. Once you know the ideas the moves will come naturally to you - perhaps better moves than are given in the notes!

 

 

A1.1e White avoids the Cambridge Springs

 

A1.1e-1 White avoids the Cambridge Springs after 5. Nf3

5... c6

White has tried

A. 6. Qc2

B. 6. Qb3

c. 6. e4

e-1(1) 6. Qc2

Now the usual attack can be easily met by

[6... Qa5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. e4 Nxc3 9. Bd2]

An active try is:

6... dxc4

[6... h6 is safer 7. Bxf6 Nxf6 8. e3 Be7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. O-O c5 11. dxc5 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Bxc5

r+bq-rk+
pp+-+pp-
-+-+pn-p
+-b-+-+-
-+B+-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PPQ+-PPP
R-+-+RK-

~= Kotov-Panov 1938]

7. e4 b5 8. e5 h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Nxg5 hxg5 11. Bxg5 Bb7

r+-qkb-r
pb+n+p+-
-+p+pn-+
+p+-P-B-
-+pP-+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPQ+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

Compared to the normal Anti-Meran system (see below), White has played the inferior move Qc2 not g3. Black will get a good game with ...Qb6 and ...O-O-O. See the section on the Semi-Slav below.

 

e-1(2) 6. Qb3

Clearly the usual attack is not possible.

6...Be7 7. e3 O-O 8. Be2 b6 9. O-O Bb7 10. Rad1 h6 11. Bh4

Samikhovsky-Kasparian 1931. Now

11... Ne4

r+-q-rk+
pb+nbpp-
-pp+p+-p
+-+p+-+-
-+PPn+-B
+QN-PN+-
PP-+BPPP
+-+R+RK-

with good play for Black

 

 

e-1(3) 6. e4

Black cannot allow this pawn to remain.

6...dxe4 7. Nxe4 h6 8. Nxf6+

[8. Bh4 g5 9. Nxf6+ Nxf6 10. Bg3 Bb4+ with advantage: not

11. Nd2 ? 11... Ne4]

8... Nxf6 9. Bd2 c5 10. Bc3 Ne4

r+bqkb-r
pp+-+pp-
-+-+p+-p
+-p-+-+-
-+PPn+-+
+-B-+N+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+QKB+R

= Subarev-Ryumin 1931

 

 

A1.1e-2 White avoids the Cambridge Springs after 5. e3

5. e3

Again you play

5... c6

Now:

(1) A. 6. Bd3

(2) B. 6. a3

(3) C. 6. Qc2

6. Nf3 would transpose to normal lines.

 

e-2(1) 6. Bd3

6...Qa5

is still OK here but see note after move 7

7. Bh4 dxc4

[not 7... Bb4 8. Nge2 +=]

8. Bxc4 b5 9. Bd3

[9. Bb3 would be met the same way]

9... b4 10. Nce2 c5 11. Nf3 Bb7 12. O-O Rc8

-+r+kb-r
pb+n+ppp
-+-+pn-+
q-p-+-+-
-p-P-+-B
+-+BPN+-
PP-+NPPP
R-+Q+RK-

= Ornstein-Sveshnikov 1977]

 

e-2(2) 6. a3

Plain enough!

6...Be7 7. Nf3 Ne4 8. Bxe7 Qxe7 9. Qc2

[or 9. Nxe4 dxe4 10. Nd2 f5 11. c5 O-O 12. Nc4 b6 13. b4 Ba6 14. Be2 Bxc4 15. Bxc4 a5 16. Qb3 Rfe8 17. O-O b5 18. Be2 a4

r+-+r+k+
+-+nq-pp
-+p+p+-+
+pP-+p+-
pP-Pp+-+
PQ+-P-+-
-+-+BPPP
R-+-+RK-

>/< Euwe-Bogolyubov 1941]

9... Nxc3 10. Qxc3 O-O 11. Be2 dxc4 12. Bxc4 b6 13. O-O Bb7 14. Rfd1 c5 15. dxc5 Nxc5

r+-+-rk+
pb+-qppp
-p-+p+-+
+-n-+-+-
-+B+-+-+
P-Q-PN+-
-P-+-PPP
R-+R+-K-

= Pirc-Rabar 1946]

 

e-2(3) 6. Qc2

An important idea as played at the highest level, but Black can equalise.

6...Qa5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. e4 Nxc3 9. Bd2 Qa4 ! 10. Qxc3 a5 11. Nf3 Bb4 12. Qc1

r+b+k+-r
+p+n+ppp
-+p+p+-+
p-+-+-+-
qb-PP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PP-B-PPP
R-Q-KB+R

~= Capablanca-Alekhin 1927

12... O-O

[12... Bxd2+ 13. Qxd2 Qb4 14. Bd3 Qxd2+ 15. Kxd2 Ke7 Neishtadt]

13. a3 Bxd2+ 14. Qxd2 e5 15. Rc1 exd4 16. Rc4 Qb5 17. Rxd4 Qc5

r+b+-rk+
+p+n+ppp
-+p+-+-+
p-q-+-+-
-+-RP+-+
P-+-+N+-
-P-Q-PPP
+-+-KB+R

now not 18. Rxd7 Bxd7 19. Qxd7 Qc1+ 20. Qd1 Qxb2]

 

 


A1.1e-3 White avoids the whole QGD by playing the Catalan

The what? The Catalan is an opening which involves c2-c4 but not e2-e3. White holds back the e-pawn and instead plays the light-squared Bishop out to the long diagonal on g2. So how can White capture the c-pawn if Black takes it? Quite!

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Nf3 b5!?

"Boy, did I underestimate this one!"

SCHILLER, Play the Catalan

This is a sneaky way of grabbing a pawn. White can play 5. Qa4+, but otherwise play is like the Abrahams' Variation game Seirawan-Korchnoi on page . Both Korchnoi and Karpov have tried this line, which is probably not totally sound but White will have to walk a tightrope to find the way to advantage.

If you don't fancy this line then uncoiling slowly with usual Slav-style moves will probably equalise. The game is too unforcing to give much detailed analysis.

I'll show you a game by Korchnoi and one by Karpov, and look at the latest theory.

6. a4

[The Karpov game went instead 6. Ne5 and White never broke up the Queen's-side pawn mass]

6... c6

The Korchnoi game went 7. O-O

The latest theory goes:

7. Ne5 Nd5 8. O-O

[Schiller recommends 8. axb5 cxb5 9. Nc3 Bb4

[or 9... Bb7]

10. O-O Bxc3 11. e4

rnbqk+-r
p-+-+ppp
-+-+p+-+
+p+nN-+-
-+pPP+-+
+-b-+-P-
-P-+-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

which is splendidly messy

11... Bxb2 12. exd5

[12. Bxb2 Ne7 13. d5 O-O 14. Ba3 f6 15. d6 Nec6 16. Nxc6 Nxc6 17. d7 b4

[Not 17... Bxd7 18. Bxf8 Kxf8 19. e5 +/-]

18. dxc8=Q Rxc8
-+rq-rk+
p-+-+-pp
-+n+pp-+
+-+-+-+-
-pp+P+-+
B-+-+-P-
-+-+-PBP
R-+Q+RK-

"unclear" OLL/NARVA]

12... Bxa1 13. Ba3 a5 unclear (!) BCO2 14. Qg4 Qf6 15. Rxa1 Ra6 16. Bc5 Nd7 17. Nxd7 Bxd7 18. Qe4
-+-+k+-r
+-+b+ppp

r+-+pq-+
ppBP+-+-
-+pPQ+-+
+-+-+-P-
-+-+-PBP
R-+-+-K-

CHERNIN awaits tests...]

After 7. Ne5 Nd5 8. O-O:

8... Bb7 9. b3 cxb3 10. axb5 cxb5 11. Qxb3 a6 12. e4 Nf6 13. d5 Bc5 !

but still += BCO2

Example Cambridge Springs games


Ottaviani,W - Liying,P (Novi-14) [D52] Cambridge Springs: loose Bg5, 1990

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. Nf3 c6 6. e3 Qa5 7. a3

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
-+PP-+-+
P-N-PN+-
-P-+-PPP
R-+QKB+R

7... Ne4 8. Qc2

[8. Qa4]

[8. b4 Bxb4 9. axb4 Qxb4 10. Rc1 Nxc3]

8... Nxg5 9. Nxg5 dxc4

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+p+-+
q-+-+-N-
-+pP-+-+
P-N-P-+-
-PQ+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

10. Bxc4 ??

[10. Nxh7 Bb4 11. Bxc4 g6]

[10. Nge4 b5 11. Be2]

10... Qxg5 11. O-O Be7 12. Rae1 O-O 13. f4 Qh6 14. Rf3 f5

r+b+-rk+
pp+nb-pp
-+p+p+-q
+-+-+p+-
-+BP-P-+
P-N-PR+-
-PQ+-+PP
+-+-R-K-

[14... Rd8 15. Rh3 Qg6 16. Bd3 f5 17. e4 Bf6]

15. e4 b5 16. Bb3 Kh8 17. exf5 Bf6 18. fxe6 Bxd4+ 19. Kh1 Nf6 20. Ne2 Ng4 21. h3 Bf2 22. Rd1 c5 23. e7 Re8 24. Qd2 c4 25. Qd8 Bb7 26. Rc3 Ne3

r+-Qr+-k
pb+-P-pp
-+-+-+-q
+p+-+-+-
-+p+-P-+
PBR-n-+P
-P-+NbP+
+-+R+-+K

27. Qb6 Qxh3# 0-1

 

 


Buthali,D - Figueroa,C (Novi-14) [D52] cambridge springs: loose Bg5, 1990

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 c6 6. Nc3 Bb4 7. Bd3 Qa5 8. Qc2 Ne4 9. Bxe4 dxe4 10. Nd2 Qxg5 11. O-O f5 12. Ne2 Bd6 13. Rad1 Nf6 14. c5

r+b+k+-r
pp+-+-pp
-+pbpn-+
+-P-+pq-
-+-Pp+-+
+-+-P-+-
PPQNNPPP
+-+R+RK-

Things go from bad to worse!

14... Bxh2+ 15. Kxh2 Qh4+ 16. Kg1 Ng4 17. Rfe1 Qxf2+ 18. Kh1 Nxe3 0-1

 


Borovikov,V - Shabanov,Y (Podolsk) [D52] Cambridge Springs: Black grabs material, 1990

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 Nbd7 6. e3 Qa5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qd2 N7b6 9. Bd3 Nxc3 10. bxc3 Na4 11. O-O Qxc3

r+b+kb-r
pp+-+ppp
-+p+p+-+
+-+-+-B-
n+-P-+-+
+-qBPN+-
P+-Q-PPP
R-+-+RK-

12. Qe2 Qb2 13. Bc2 h6 14. Bh4 Nc3 15. Qd3 Nd5 16. Ne5 g5 17. Nxf7 Kxf7 18. Qg6+ Ke7 19. Bg3 Rg8 20. Qxg8 Qxc2 21. Rae1 Bd7 22. f4 Nf6 23. Qh8 Qh7

r+-+-b-Q
pp+bk-+q
-+p+pn-p
+-+-+-p-
-+-P-P-+
+-+-P-B-
P+-+-+PP
+-+-RRK-

24. Qxh7+ Nxh7 25. fxg5 Nxg5 26. h4 Nf7 27. Rb1 b6 28. Be1 Rc8 29. Bb4+ Ke8 30. Bxf8 Kxf8 31. Rf6 Ke7 32. Rbf1 Be8 33. h5 c5 34. g4

-+r+b+-+
p-+-kn+-
-p-+pR-p
+-p-+-+P
-+-P-+P+
+-+-P-+-
P+-+-+-+
+-+-+RK-

34... c4 35. Rg6 c3 36. Kf2 Bc6 37. Ke1 Bb5 38. Rh1 Bd3 39. Kd1 Rc4 40. a3 Ra4 0-1

 



Duemer,K - Meyer,Frh (2.BLSW) [D52] cambridge springs: Q-side attack, 1989

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 c6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Nf3 Qa5 7. Nd2 Bb4 8. Qc2 dxc4 9. Bxf6 Nxf6 10. Nxc4 Qc7 11. a3 Be7 12. Be2 O-O 13. O-O Bd7 14. b4 Rfd8 15. g3 Be8 16. Rfd1 b6 17. Bf3 a5

r+-rb+k+
+-q-bppp
-pp+pn-+
p-+-+-+-
-PNP-+-+
P-N-PBP-
-+Q+-P-P
R-+R+-K-

18. bxa5 b5 19. Nb2 Rxa5 20. a4 Qa7 21. Rdc1 Nd5 22. Bd1 Ra8 23. Ne4 Nb6 24. Nc3 c5

r+-+b+k+
q-+-bppp
-n-+p+-+
rpp-+-+-
P+-P-+-+
+-N-P-P-
-NQ+-P-P
R-RB+-K-

25. dxc5 Nxa4 26. Ncxa4 bxa4 27. Nd3 Rc8 28. Ra3 Bd7 29. e4 Bc6 30. e5 Rb8 31. Qd2 h6 32. Bc2 Bxc5 33. Nxc5 Rxc5

-r-+-+k+
q-+-+pp-
-+b+p+-p
+-r-P-+-
p+-+-+-+
R-+-+-P-
-+BQ-P-P
+-R-+-K-

34. Qd3 g6 35. Rca1 Ra8 36. Qd2 Kg7 37. Qd1 Ra5 38. Qd2 Qd7 39. Qf4 Qd5 40. Qf6+ Kg8

r+-+-+k+
+-+-+p+-
-+b+pQpp
r-+qP-+-
p+-+-+-+
R-+-+-P-
-+B+-P-P
R-+-+-K-

41. f3 Qc5+ 0-1

 


El Mezwaghi,H - Mubarak,A (Novi-12) [D52] cambridge springs: Queen's-side majority in EG, 1990

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 c6 6. Nf3 Qa5 7. Qa4

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
Q+PP-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

7... Qxa4 8. Nxa4 dxc4 9. Nc3 b5 10. Be2 Bb4 11. O-O Bxc3 12. bxc3 Ne4 13. Rfc1 Nb6 14. Rc2 Nd5 15. Rac1 f6 16. Bh4 g5 17. Bg3 h5 18. Nd2 Nxg3 19. hxg3 Ke7 20. Rb2 Bd7 21. Ne4 h4 22. g4 Nb6 23. Nc5 a5

r+-+-+-r
+-+bk-+-
-np+pp-+
ppN-+-p-
-+pP-+Pp
+-P-P-+-
PR-+BPP+
+-R-+-K-

24. a4 Rhb8 25. axb5 cxb5 26. Nxd7 Nxd7 27. Rcb1 a4 28. Rb4 a3 29. Ra1 Ra5 30. Kf1 Nb6 31. e4 Rba8 32. Ke1 e5 33. Kd2 Nd7 34. Ra2 exd4 35. cxd4 Nb8 36. Rb1 Nc6 37. Ke3 Rb8 38. f3 Rd8 39. d5 Ne5 40. f4 gxf4+ 41. Kxf4 Kd6 42. Kf5 Rb8

-r-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-k-p-+
rp+PnK+-
-+p+P+Pp
p-+-+-+-
R+-+B+P+
+R+-+-+-

43. Rba1 b4 44. Bd1 Ra7 45. Kf4 Rba8 46. Rb1 Rb7 47. Rba1 Rba7 48. Rb1 Nd3+ 49. Kf5 Nb2 50. Be2 c3 51. Kxf6 c2 52. e5+ Kxd5 53. Rc1 Rf8+ 54. Kg5 b3 55. Raa1 Nc4 56. e6 b2 0-1

 


Michaelsen,N - Hort,V (FRG-ch) [D52] cambridge springs: break on Q-side, 1989

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bg5 c6 6. e3 Qa5 7. Nd2 dxc4 8. Bxf6 Nxf6 9. Nxc4 Qc7 10. Rc1 Nd5 11. a3 Be7 12. Be2 a5 13. O-O O-O 14. Bf3 Rd8 15. Qc2 Bd7 16. Ne4 Be8 17. Rfd1 b6 18. g3 Rac8 19. h4 h6

-+rrb+k+
+-q-bpp-
-pp+p+-p
p-+n+-+-
-+NPN+-P
P-+-PBP-
-PQ+-P-+
+-RR+-K-

20. Kg2 Bf8 21. Qb1 a4 22. Qc2 Qb8 23. Qb1 g6 24. Nc3 Nxc3 25. Rxc3 c5

-qrrbbk+
+-+-+p+-
-p-+p+pp
+-p-+-+-
p+NP-+-P
P-R-PBP-
-P-+-PK+
+Q+R+-+-

26. dxc5 Rxc5 27. Rxd8 Qxd8 28. Qe4 Bc6 29. Qg4 h5 30. Qf4 Bxf3+ 31. Qxf3 Bg7 32. Rc2 Qc7

-+-+-+k+
+-q-+pb-
-p-+p+p+
+-r-+-+p
p+N+-+-P
P-+-PQP-
-PR+-PK+
+-+-+-+-

33. Qf4

[33. Qa8+ Kh7 34. Qxa4 b5 35. Qa6 Rxc4]

33... b5 0-1

 


Perez,A - Perera,M [D52] cambridge springs: chances with NN, 1989

1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. e3 c6 6. Nf3 Qa5 7. Qa4

r+b+kb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+pn-+
q-+p+-B-
Q+PP-+-+
+-N-PN+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+-KB+R

7... Qxa4 8. Nxa4 Bb4+ 9. Nc3 Ne4 10. Rc1 Nb6 11. a3 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Na4 13. cxd5 exd5 14. c4 Be6 15. Bh4 O-O 16. Bd3 Nec3 17. Ng5 h6 18. Nxe6 fxe6 19. cxd5 cxd5

an interesting BB vs. NN ending has arisen

20. O-O Rac8 21. Rc2 Rc7 22. Rfc1 Rfc8

-+r+-+k+
ppr-+-p-
-+-+p+-p
+-+p+-+-
n+-P-+-B
P-nBP-+-
-+R+-PPP
+-R-+-K-

23. f3

[23. Kf1]

23... Ne2+ 24. Rxe2 Rxc1+

-+r+-+k+
pp+-+-p-
-+-+p+-p
+-+p+-+-
n+-P-+-B
P-+BPP+-
-+-+R+PP
+-r-+-K-

25. Kf2 R8c3 26. Bb5 Nb6 27. Be7 a6 28. Be8 Nc4 29. Bd7 Kf7 30. Bb4 R3c2 31. e4 a5 32. Be1 Rxe2+ 33. Kxe2 b6 34. exd5 exd5 35. Bf2 Ra1 36. a4 Nb2 37. Bc6 Ke6 38. Bg3 Nxa4 39. Be5 g6 40. Be8 Nb2 41. Bxg6 Nc4 42. Bg7 Ra2+ 43. Kf1 Ne3+ 44. Ke1 Nxg2+ 45. Kd1 Ne3+ 0-1

 

 

Example games where White avoids the Cambridge Springs

The only examples I have are from the Catalan.

Lengyel-Karpov, Moscow 1972

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Nf3 b5!? 6. Ne5 Nd5 7. O-O Bb7 8. e4 Nf6 9. Re1 Nbd7 10. Qe2 a6 11. Nc3 Nxe5 12. dxe5 Nd7

r+-qkb-r
+bpn+ppp
p+-+p+-+
+p+-P-+-
-+p+P+-+
+-N-+-P-
PP-+QPBP
R-B-R-K-

13. Rd1 Qc8 14. f4 Bc5+ 15. Be3 O-O 16. Rd2 Bxe3+ 17. Qxe3 c5 18. Rad1 Bc6 ! (N moves are met by f4-f5) 19. Rd6 Re8 20. R1d2 ?! 20... Qc7 21. Nd1 b4 !? 22. Bf1 Bb5 23. Bxc4 Nb6 24. Bxb5 axb5 25. b3 Nc8 26. Rd7 Qb6 27. Rc2 c4 28. Rd4 Ra3

-+n+r+k+
+-+-+ppp
-q-+p+-+
+p+-P-+-
-ppRPP-+
rP+-Q-P-
P+R+-+-P
+-+N+-K-

29. Nf2 Ne7 30. Qd2 c3 31. Qd3 Nc6 32. Rd6 Raa8 33. Kg2 Red8 34. a3 Rxd6 35. exd6 Nd4

r+-+-+k+
+-+-+ppp
-q-Pp+-+
+p+-+-+-
-p-nPP-+
PPpQ+-P-
-+R+-NKP
+-+-+-+-

36. axb4 Nxc2 37. Qxc2 Qd4 38. Kf3

[38. e5 may have been more worrying]

38... e5 39. Nd3 exf4 40. gxf4 f6 41. e5 0-1

 

Tukmakov-Korchnoi Leningrad 1973

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Nf3 b5!? 6. a4 c6 7. O-O Bb7 8. Ne5 a6

[8... Qc8]

9. b3

[9. axb5 axb5 10. Rxa8 Bxa8 11. Nc3 Nd5 12. e4 Nxc3 13. bxc3 Bd6 =+]

9... cxb3 10. Bb2 Qb6 11. Qxb3 Nbd7 12. Nxd7

[12. Nc3 b4]

[12. Nd2 Nxe5 13. dxe5 Nd7 14. Ne4 ? 14... Nc5 15. Qe3 Nxa4 -+]

12... Nxd7 13. Nd2 Be7 14. d5 (!) 14... cxd5 15. Bxg7 Rg8 16. Bc3

[16. Bh6 (!) 16... Bf6 17. Rab1 Rg6 18. Be3 d4 19. Nc4 bxc4 20. Qxb6 Nxb6 21. Bxb7]

16... Rg4

[16... b4 17. a5 Qb5 18. Bb2 Nc5 =+]

17. Rfb1 Bc5 18. e3 Bxe3!!

r+-+k+-+
+b+n+p+p
pq-+p+-+
+p+p+-+-
P+-+-+r+
+QB-b-P-
-+-N-PBP
RR+-+-K-

19. fxe3 Qxe3+ 20. Kh1 Rc8

[simpler is 20... Nc5]

21. Ba5

[not 21. Rc1 Nc5]

21... Qxb3 22. Nxb3 Rxa4 23. Rxa4 bxa4 24. Nd2 Bc6 25. Rc1 Ne5 26. Kg1 Kd7 27. Nf3 Nxf3+ 28. Bxf3 d4

-+r+-+-+
+-+k+p+p
p+b+p+-+
B-+-+-+-
p+-p-+-+
+-+-+BP-
-+-+-+-P
+-R-+-K-

29. Bh5 f5 30. g4 fxg4 ?!

[30... Rg8]

31. Rd1

[31. Rc4 ?!]

31... Bd5 32. Rxd4 Rc1+ 33. Kf2 a3 34. Bxg4 a2 35. Bc3

[35. Rxd5+ Kc6]

35... Rc2+ 36. Ke1 Rxc3 37. Rxd5+ Ke7 38. Rd1 Rb3 0-1

Chess Quotes

"I think it's almost definite that the game is a draw theoretically."
— -- FISCHER