Playing Black against Queen's-Pawn Openings (3): without c2-c4

A2 Playing actively against 1. D4

The Stonewall Attack

I will follow some lines from Fine in his 1943 book The Ideas behind the Chess Openings. You will soon see the connection with this section.

 

Start: 1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Bd3

[3. f4 is sometimes played to avoid the 3...Nc6 line]

3... c5

[More to the point is 3... Nc6 4. f4 [

or 4. c3 e5

] 4... Nb4 5. Nf3 Nxd3+ 6. cxd3 g6 7. Nc3 Bg7 8. O-O O-O]

4. c3 Nc6 5. f4

r+bqkb-r
pp+-pppp
-+n+-n-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-P-P-+
+-PBP-+-
PP-+-+PP
RNBQK-NR

Now play might go:

5... e6 (which doesn't look quite right, as it blocks the Bc8)

6. Nf3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. Ne5 Qc7

White's threatening Ne5 needed some response; Black could also try to occupy e4

9. Nd2 Re8 10. g4 (DIAGRAM)

with a crushing attack.

This is the ideal Stonewall position.

r+b+r+k+
ppq-+ppp
-+nbpn-+
+-ppN-+-
-+-P-PP+
+-PBP-+-
PP-N-+-P
R-BQ+RK-

Let's go back to the first diagram.

Instead, we might try for Black 5... Bg4,

and play then might go 6. Nf3 e6 7. Nbd2 Bd6 8. h3 Bh5 9. b3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Rc8 (DIAGRAM)

Black is comfortable
-+rqk+-r
pp+-+ppp
-+nbpn-+
+-+p+-+b
-+-P-P-+
+P+BPN+P
P+-N-+P+
R-BQK-+R

Because Black can see what White is up to, Black can arrange the development to counter it. White's opening plan is not camouflaged enough to stop Black from seeing what is going on and opposing it, and the opening moves are not flexible enough to try any other plan. This is why you don't see the Stonewall very often among stronger players.

One place where the Stonewall formation will not go away is Black playing it in the Dutch Defence. Why is this more common?

­ White, starting first, is usually trying to get an advantage and won't play just to equalise with moves like Bf4, Bxd6, Ne5 and f4.

­ Instead, White will often adopt an attacking formation on the Queen's side to start with and so there is a tendency for each side to attack on opposite sides.

­ White often plays g3 and Bg2, creating a slow game with a slightly weakened King's side. Black can hope to get the ...f4 break in at some point.

This may help explain why you see the Stonewall is a better idea played a move behind in the Dutch Defence than played straight away as White. Perhaps the real reason is that World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik kept playing and winning with it for decades. Take a look at these games:

 

A2.1 The Dutch Defence, Stonewall Variation

Rabinovitch - Botvinnik (Ussr Ch'p, 1927)

1. d4 e6 2. c4 f5 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nc3 O-O 6. Nf3 d5 7. O-O c6 8. Qc2 Qe8 9. Bf4 Qh5 10. Rad1 Nbd7 11. b3 Ne4 12. Ne5 Ng5

[12... Bf6 is better, says MB]

13. h4

[13. f3 Nh3+ 14. Bxh3 Qxh3 15. e4 += MB]

13... Ne4 14. Bf3 Qe8 15. Nxd7 Bxd7 16. Kg2 Bb4

r+-+qrk+
pp+b+-pp
-+p+p+-+
+-+p+p+-
-bPPnB-P
+PN-+BP-
P+Q+PPK+
+-+R+R+-

White seems to have defended more than got on with his own plans. He now makes a mistake:

17. Bxe4 ? 17... fxe4 18. Rh1 Qh5 19. f3 Qg6 20. Kf1 e5 21. dxe5 Rxf4 22. gxf4

r+-+-+k+
pp+b+-pp
-+p+-+q+
+-+pP-+-
-bP+pP-P
+PN-+P+-
P+Q+P+-+
+-+R+K+R

Black has some clear achievements: the open g-file, the two bishops, the upset White King.

22... Qg3

threats ...Bc5/...e3

23. Nxe4 dxe4 24. Rxd7 Bc5 25. e3 Qxf3+ 26. Qf2 Qxh1+ 27. Ke2 Qh3 28. f5 Qg4+ 29. Kd2 Rf8 30. e6 Qxf5 31. Qxf5 Rxf5 32. Rxb7 Rf2+ 33. Ke1 Rf6 34. b4 Bxe3 0-1

 

Another decisive King's side attack:

Steiner - Botvinnik, Groningen, 1946

1. d4 e6 2. c4 f5 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Nf3 d5 7. Nc3 c6 8. O-O O-O 9. Bf4 Qe8 10. Qc2 Qh5 11. Rae1 Nbd7 12. Nd2

Aiming at e4, but too slowly. Another plan is to attack c6 with the b-pawn.

12... g5 13. Bc7 Ne8 14. Be5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 f4

Black's plans are well-advanced; e4 will now be answered by ..f3

16. gxf4 gxf4 17. Nf3 Kh8 18. Kh1 Ng7 19. Qc1 Bd7 20. a3 Rf7 21. b4 Rg8

-+-+-+rk
pp+bbrnp
-+p+p+-+
+-+pP-+q
-PP+-p-+
P-N-+N+-
-+-+PPBP
+-Q-RR+K

Making use of the open g-file

22. Rg1 Nf5 23. Nd1 Rfg7

-+-+-+rk
pp+bb-rp
-+p+p+-+
+-+pPn+q
-PP+-p-+
P-+-+N+-
-+-+PPBP
+-QNR-RK

Black has a winning position

24. Qxf4 Rg4 25. Qd2 Nh4 26. Ne3 Nxf3 27. exf3 Rh4 28. Nf1 Bg5 0-1

-+-+-+rk
pp+b+-+p
-+p+p+-+
+-+pP-bq
-PP+-+-r
P-+-+P+-
-+-Q-PBP
+-+-RNRK

if the Q moves, ...Bf4 forces mate.

Here's an important game against a powerful rival.

 

Flohr - Botvinnik (10) Match, 1933

1. d4 e6 2. c4 f5 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nc3 d5 6. Nf3 c6 7. O-O O-O 8. b3

[8. Bf4 is better, says Botvinnink, or 8. Qc2 Qe8 9. Bg5 with Bxf6]

8... Qe8 9. Bb2 Nbd7 10. Qd3

[ 10. Ng5 Bd6 11. f4 Botvinnik]

10... Qh5 11. cxd5

[11. Bc1 Botvinnik]

11... exd5 12. Nd2

[12. Ne1 and f4]

12... Ne4 13. f3

[13. f4 is now met by 13... Nxd2 14. Qxd2 Nf6 when White cannot really hope to get the N to e5]

13... Nxc3 14. Bxc3 f4 ! 15. Rfe1 Bd6 16. Nf1 Rf7 17. e3 fxg3 18. Nxg3 Qh4 19.Nf1 Nf6 20. Re2 Bd7 21. Be1 Qg5 22. Bg3 Bxg3 23. Nxg3 h5!

r+-+-+k+
pp+b+rp-
-+p+-n-+
+-+p+-qp
-+-P-+-+
+P+QPPN-
P+-+R+BP
R-+-+-K-

the final phase

24. f4 Qg4 25. Rf2 h4 26. Bf3

[26. h3 Qe6 27. Nf1 Ne4 is still -+]

26... hxg3 27. Bxg4 gxf2+ 28. Kg2 Nxg4 29. h3 Nf6 30. Kxf2 Ne4+ 0-1

 

And lastly, a more complicated game from an early tournament:

Yudovitch - Botvinnik, 1934

1. c4 f5 2. d4 Nf6 3. g3 e6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. Nf3 d5 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 c6 8. Qc2 Qe8 9. Bf4

[9. Bg5 Chekhover]

9... Qh5 10. b3 Nbd7 11. Rad1 Kh8 12. Kh1

a loss of tempo, and perhaps not even a better square

12... Rg8 13. e3 g5 14. Bc7 Ne8 15. Be5+ Nxe5 16. Nxe5 Nf6 17. f3

r+b+-+rk
pp+-b-+p
-+p+pn-+
+-+pNppq
-+PP-+-+
+PN-PPP-
P+Q+-+BP
+-+R+R+K

the right plan for White

17... Bd6 18. e4 Nd7 19. g4

[19. Nxd7 Bxg3]

19... Qe8 20. Nxd7 Bxd7 21. e5 Bb4 22. gxf5 exf5 23. cxd5

r+-+q+rk
pp+b+-+p
-+p+-+-+
+-+PPpp-
-b-P-+-+
+PN-+P+-
P+Q+-+BP
+-+R+R+K

 

23... Bxc3 24. dxc6 risky 24... Bxc6 25. Qxc3 Qe6 26. Qd2 Bd5 27. Rc1 Rg7 28. Rc2 f4 29. Qc1 Rag8 30. h3 h5 31. Kg1 g4 32. hxg4 hxg4 33. Kf2 Rh7 34. Rh1 g3+ 35. Ke1 Rxh1+ 36. Bxh1 Qh6 37. Bg2

the last move before the time-check

37... Bc6

[37... Be6]

38. a4 Bd7

going for complications instead

[38... Bd5]

39. d5 Bf5 40. Rc7 Qh2 41. Qb2 Qg1+ 42. Bf1 Qe3+ 43. Be2 Be6 44. Qc2 Rg7

-+-+-+-k
ppR-+-r-
-+-+b+-+
+-+PP-+-
P+-+-p-+
+P+-qPp-
-+Q+B+-+
+-+-K-+-

45. dxe6

[45. Rc8+ Bg8 46. Qf5 and Rxg8+, getting perpetual]

45... Qf2+ 46. Kd2 Qd4+

controlling d8

47. Ke1 Rxc7 0-1

 

Since Nigel Short has ventured the Stonewall on occasion interest in the opening has grown again.



Martin - Troger [A94] 1995

1. Nf3 f5 2. d4 Nf6 3. g3 e6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 d5 7. b3 c6 8. Ba3 Bd7 9. Bxe7 Qxe7

rn-+-rk+
pp+bq-pp
-+p+pn-+
+-+p+p+-
-+PP-+-+
+P+-+NP-
P+-+PPBP
RN+Q+RK-

Black has played it the old-fashioned way: more interest recently has been in the idea of parking the Queen's Bishop on b7. White has responded with another traditional recipe - exchange off Black's good bishop and milk the dark squares.

10. Nc3 (?)

Martin was unhappy about this natural move afterwards. Either

[10. Nbd2 Be8 11. Ne5 Nbd7 12. Ndf3 Bh5]

or

[10. Qc1 Be8 11. Qa3 Qxa3 12. Nxa3 Nbd7]

could have been tried, but Black is by no means losing either game.

10... Be8 11. Qc2 Nbd7 12. cxd5 cxd5!

[Not 12... exd5 13. Qxf5 Ne4 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. Qxd5+ Bf7 16. Qxb7]

13. e3 Bh5 14. Rfc1 Bxf3 15. Bxf3

r+-+-rk+
pp+nq-pp
-+-+pn-+
+-+p+p+-
-+-P-+-+
+PN-PBP-
P+Q+-P-P
R-R-+-K-

=+ Martin

15... Rac8 16. Qb2 Nb6

[16... Nb8]

17. a4 g5 18. a5 Nbd7 19. a6 b6 20. Be2 Nb8

Right idea but too late: White is now better.

21. Nb5 Nc6 22. Rc2 Nd7

[22... Nb4 23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24. Qa3]

23. Rxc6

else ...Nd7-b8 and Black is ready to attack the King

23... Rxc6 24. Nxa7 Rc7 25. Nb5 Rcc8 26. a7 Nf6 27. Qa2

-+r+-rk+
P-+-q-+p
-p-+pn-+
+N+p+pp-
-+-P-+-+
+P+-P-P-
Q+-+BP-P
R-+-+-K-

27... Kg7 28. Qa6 Qd8 29. Qb7+ Kg6 30. Ra6 Ra8 31. Nc7 Qe7 32. Qxb6 Qd8 33. Nxa8 Qxa8 34. Qxe6 Rf7 35. Bd3 1-0

 

A2.2 White avoids the Stonewall

There is no Exchange Variation against the Dutch but there are some annoying ways for White to avoid the Stonewall. You can avoid all these by playing first ...d5, ...e6, ...c6 and ...f5, but you must then face the Exchange QGD.

1. d4 f5

A2.2a Modern System with Bg5xf6

2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Bxf6 exf6 5. e3 Be6 6. Bd3 g6

This is currently very popular. I offer you a selection of games in the examples section.

 

A2.2b Staunton Gambit with e4

2. e4 fxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6

Now White can play:

(a) 4. Bg5 Nc6 5. d5 Ne5 6. Qd4 Nf7 7. Bh4

[7. Bxf6 exf6 8. Nxe4 f5 9. Ng3 g6 10. O-O-O Bh6+ 11. f4 O-O 12. Nf3 Bg7 13. Qd2 b5 14. Nd4 Nd6

r+bq-rk+
p-pp+-bp
-+-n-+p+
+p+P+p+-
-+-N-P-+
+-+-+-N-
PPPQ-+PP
+-KR+B+R

= BCO2]

7... g5 8. Bg3 Bg7 9. O-O-O

[9. Nxe4 O-O]

9... c6 =+ BCO2

 

(b) 4. f3

4... Nc6

[4... d5 5. fxe4 dxe4 6. Bg5 Bf5 7. Bc4 e6

[7... Nbd7 8. Nge2 Nb6 9. Bb3 Qd7 = BCO2]

8. Nge2 Bb4 9. O-O c6 =]

5. fxe4 e5 6. dxe5 Nxe5 7. Nf3 d6 8. Bf4 Ng6]]

 

A2.2c Korchnoi Gambit with g4

Korchnoi has offered a number of gambits with g2-g4, making use of the target on f5.

See the example game Menadue-Pert.

 

A2.2d Others

These shouldn't be any problem

BCO2 gives:

2. Qd3 d5 3. Bf4 e6 4. Qg3 Na6 5. e3 c6 =+

Ivkov


Examples of White avoiding the Dutch

Karayannis-Bellin 1993

1. d4 e6 2. c4 f5 3. e4

rnbqkbnr
pppp+-pp
-+-+p+-+
+-+-+p+-
-+PPP+-+
+-+-+-+-
PP-+-PPP
RNBQKBNR

This almost forgotten gambit is not much worse than the others which surface sporadically. Even though dubious, all such gambits require precise defence from Black. -- BELLIN

3... fxe4 4. Nc3 Nf6 5. g4 h6 6. h4 d5 7. Nh3 Nc6 8. Nf4 e5 9. Ng6

[9. dxe5 Nxe5 x f3]

[9. Nfxd5 exd4 10. Nxf6+ Qxf6 11. Nd5 Bb4+ is also fine]

9... Bxg4 10. Qa4

White insists on being shown, but 10. Be2 was better

10... exd4 11. Nxh8

[11. Nxd5 Nxd5 12. cxd5 Bb4+ 13. Bd2 Bxd2+ 14. Kxd2 Qxd5 and the White King will not survive ...e3+]

11... dxc3 12. bxc3 d4 13. Rb1

[13. Ng6 dxc3 14. Ne5 Bb4 15. Nxc6 Qd2+ 16. Bxd2 cxd2#]

[13. Bh3 Bxh3 14. Rxh3 Qd7 15. Rg3 Bd6 is very good for Black]

13... dxc3 14. Rxb7

[14. Bh3 Qd3]

[14. Ng6 Qd7 and White is all but paralysed]

14... Qd7 15. f3

[15. Rb5 Bb4 16. Rxb4 Nxb4 17. Qxd7+ Kxd7]

[15. Bh3 Bxh3 16. Rxh3 Bb4 17. Rxb4 Nxb4 18. Qxb4 Qxh3 19. Ba3 O-O-O]

15... exf3 16. Be3 Bc5 17. Rxc7 Qd2+ 18. Bxd2 f2#

A triumph for the spear-carriers

 

Menadue - Pert 1995

1. d4 e6 2. Nf3 f5 3. h3 Nf6 4. g4 b6

Normally White would try to blot this out by d5 but there is no Pc4

5. gxf5 exf5 6. Bg2 Bb7 7. Bg5 Be7 8. Nc3 O-O 9. h4

rn-q-rk+
pbppb-pp
-p-+-n-+
+-+-+pB-
-+-P-+-P
+-N-+N+-
PPP+PPB+
R-+QK-+R

White is wasting too much time on attacking-looking moves but has no real plan.

[9. d5!?]

9... Qe8 10. Qd3 Nc6 11. O-O-O

[11. Qxf5 Nb4 12. O-O-O Ne4 -+]

11... Nb4 12. Qc4+ d5 13. Qxc7 ?

opens a file against the King

13... Ba6 14. Qe5 Rc8 15. Qxf5 ?

[15. a3]

15... Rxc3 16. Qe6+ Kh8 17. bxc3 Nxa2+ 18. Kd2

-+-+qr-k
p-+-b-pp
bp-+Qn-+
+-+p+-B-
-+-P-+-P
+-P-+N+-
n+PKPPB+
+-+R+-+R

[18. Kb2 Nxc3!]

18... Bb4!

a beautiful bit of opportunism

19. Bh3

[19. Qxe8 Bxc3+ 20. Ke3 Ng4#]

19... Bxc3+ 20. Ke3 Nb4 21. Qxe8

[21. Rc1 Qb5 22. Rhe1 Bxe1 23. Rxe1

[23. Nxe1 Qxe2+ 24. Kf4 Nh5#]

23... Nxc2+ 24. Kd2 Ne4+ 25. Kxc2 Rxf3 26. exf3 Qd3+ 27. Kc1 Qc3+ 28. Kb1

[28. Kd1 Nxf2#]

28... Bd3+ 29. Ka2 Qa5+ 30. Kb2

[30. Kb3 is better but only delays the inevitable 30... Bc4+ 31. Kb2 Qb4+ 32. Kc1 Qa3+ 33. Kd1 Bb3+ 34. Ke2 Qa2+ 35. Kd3 Qc2+ 36. Ke3 Qd2#]

30... Qb4+ 31. Ka2 Nc3+ 32. Ka1 Qa3#]

21... Ng4+ 22. Bxg4 Nxc2# 1-0

 


Langeweg,K - Perez Garcia,H [A80] Wijk-B, 1986

1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. b3 c5 7. e3 cxd4 8. exd4 d5 9. Ne5 Nc6 10. Re1 Ne4 11. f3 Nxe5 12. fxe4 Nf3+ 0-1

 


Sparreboom,W - Bellin,R [A80] Guernsey op, 1988

1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Ne5 d6 4. Nd3 Nc6 5. e3 Nf6 6. Nd2 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. d5 Nxd5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 0-1

 


Barczyczyn - Vasiukov,E [A80] Bled op, 1989

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Bf4 c6

The London System vs. the Dutch

5. h3 e6 6. e3 Be7 7. Be2 O-O 8. Ne5 Nbd7 9. g4 Nxe5 10. dxe5 Ne4 11. Nxe4 fxe4 12. Qd2 Bh4 13. O-O-O Bxf2 14. g5 Qb6 15. Bf1 Rxf4 16. exf4 Be3

oops

17. Bg2 Bd7 18. Rhe1 Bxd2+ 19. Rxd2 Rf8

-+-+-rk+
pp+b+-pp
-qp+p+-+
+-+pP-P-
-+-+pP-+
+-+-+-+P
PPPR-+B+
+-K-R-+-

20. Bxe4 Rxf4 21. Bd3 0-1

 


Ligterink,G (2470) - Van Heste,J (2290) [A80] NLD-ch, 1987

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Bxf6 exf6 5. e3 c6 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. Qf3 g6 8. h3 Qe7 9. g4 f4 10. O-O-O fxe3 11. Re1 O-O 12. Rxe3 Qc7 13. Nge2 f5 14. gxf5 Bxf5 15. Bxf5 Rxf5 16. Re8+ Kf7 17. Qe3 Be7 18. Rh8 Kg7 19. Re8 Bg5

rn-+R+-+
ppq-+-kp
-+p+-+p+
+-+p+rb-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-Q-+P
PPP+NP-+
+-K-+-+R

20. f4 Rxf4 21. Kb1 Rf1+ 22. Rxf1 Bxe3 23. Rxe3 Na6 24. Nf4 Kh6 25. Nd3 Qd6 26. Ne5 Rf8 27. Nf7+ Kg7 28. Ref3 Qe7 29. Ne5 Rxf3 30. Rxf3 Qh4 31. Ne2 Qe4 32. Rf7+ Kg8 33. Rf2 Nb4 34. Nc1 Qxd4 35. Re2 Qd1 36. a3 Na2 37. Kxa2 Qxc1 38. Nd3 Qg5 39. Nc5 Qh4 40. b3 b6 0-1

 


Maksimovic,S (2345) - Akhmilovskaya,E (2420) [A80] Sochi, 1987

1. d4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. Bxf6 exf6 5. e3 c6 6. Bd3 g6 7. Qf3 Bb4 8. Nge2 Nd7 9. h3 Ne5

A characteristic tactic.

10. dxe5 fxe5 11. O-O-O e4 12. Bxe4 fxe4 13. Nxe4 Rf8 14. Qg3 Qe7 15. N4c3 Bd6 16. f4 Bd7 17. Rhe1 O-O-O 18. Nd4 b5 19. Nf3 b4

-+kr-r-+
p-+bq-+p
-+pb-+p+
+-+p+-+-
-p-+-P-+
+-N-PNQP
PPP+-+P+
+-KRR-+-

20. Nb1 Rde8 21. Nbd2 Qf6 22. Qf2 Bc5 23. Nb3 Bb6 24. Qd2 Re4 25. Ne5 Re8 26. Qd3 Rxe3 27. Qa6+ Kc7 28. Rxe3 Qxf4 29. Kb1 Qxe3 30. Nxd7 Kxd7 31. Qb7+ Kd6 32. Qxh7 Qe4 33. g4 Re7 34. Qg8 Kc7 35. Qf8 Kb7 36. h4 a5 37. a4 bxa3 38. bxa3 a4 39. Nd2 Qe2 40. Rf1 Bc5 0-1

 


Cazzaniga,W - Speck,H [A80] Mendrisio op, 1988

1. d4 f5 2. g4 d5 3. Bg5 Nf6 4. h3 c6 5. Bxf6 exf6 6. e3 Qb6 7. b3 Bd6 8. Bd3 f4 9. exf4 Bxf4 10. Ne2 Qc7 11. Nxf4 Qxf4 12. Qd2 Qf3 13. Qe2+ Qxe2+ 14. Kxe2 b6 15. Nd2 Kf7 16. f4 Ba6 17. c4 Nd7 18. a4 c5 19. Bf5 Rhd8

r+-r-+-+
p-+n+kpp
bp-+-p-+
+-pp+B+-
P+PP-PP+
+P+-+-+P
-+-NK+-+
R-+-+-+R

20. Bxh7 cxd4 21. Kf2 dxc4 22. Be4 Rac8 23. Bd5+ Kf8 24. bxc4 Nc5 25. g5 Re8 26. gxf6 Nd3+ 27. Kg3 Re3+ 28. Kh4 Nxf4 29. fxg7+ Kxg7 30. Rhg1+ Kh6 31. Bf3 Rf8 32. Rg4 Bc8 33. Kg3 Bxg4 34. hxg4 Rd3 35. Rh1+ Kg7 36. Rh2 Ng6 37. Re2 Rf7 0-1

 

 

B. English opening

This subtle system is out to stop you playing ...d5, and then taking over the centre or Queen's-side later.

 

B1 Playing solidly against 1. c4

The ...e6 system is a nice counter to the English; ...c6 is OK as a system as long as White does not transpose into something unfamiliar to you.

1. c4

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+P+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
PP-PPPPP
RNBQKBNR

1... e6

[1... c6

Now

(a) 2. Nf3 is OK

2... d5 3. b3 Nf6 4. Bb2 Bg4

[or 4... Bf5]

BUT

(b) 2. e4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nf3 Bb4 is a Caro-Kann or Nimzo-Indian line which is OK for Black but is outside the scope of the repertoire I recommend]

2. Nf3 d5 3. b3 c6 4. g3 Nf6

An alternative system is:


Kurajica [A13] Agincourt Defence (French-English), 1995

1. c4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. g3 c6

offering to transpose into standard QP lines

4. b3

rnbqkbnr
pp+-+ppp
-+p+p+-+
+-+p+-+-
-+P+-+-+
+P+-+NP-
P+-PPP-P
RNBQKB+R

insisting on independent lines

[4. d4]

[4. Bg2 dxc4 5. Qc2 b5 6. a4 Bb7 -/+ Carls-Nimzovitch 1925]

[4. Qc2 Nf6 5. Bg2 a5 6. O-O Na6 7. a3 Be7 8. d4

[8. b3]

8... O-O 9. Nbd2 b6 Naranja-Larsen 1973]

4... b5

Black intends to bite the c-pawn until it screams in pain " Benjamin/Schiller

5. Bg2 Ba6

rn-qkbnr
p-+-+ppp
b+p+p+-+
+p+p+-+-
-+P+-+-+
+P+-+NP-
P+-PPPBP
RNBQK-+R

6. cxd5

[6. d3 Qb6 != Kurajica]

6... cxd5 7. O-O Nf6 8. Bb2 Be7 9. d3 O-O

rn-q-rk+
p-+-bppp
b+-+pn-+
+p+p+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+P+P+NP-
PB-+PPBP
RN+Q+RK-

10. e4

White could also try:

[10. Nbd2 Nc6 11. a3

[11. Rc1 Qb6 =+ Masic-Kurajica 1972]

11... b4 12. axb4 Nxb4 13. Ne5 Qb6 = Romanishin-Kurajica 1977]

[10. Ne5!? is a suggestion of Watson]

10... dxe4 11. dxe4 b4 =+ Hartoch-Kurajica 1974 =

 

B2 Playing actively against 1. c4

Your Dutch-style system is a fine counter to the English. The first time I ever tried it I beat a 140-grade player in about 30 moves.

Theory of the Anglo-Dutch

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3

This is the Sicilian Reversed line of the English Opening, sometimes called the King's English. Black can play two lines with a Dutch feel, playing on the second move either 2...d6 or 2...Nc6. The first risks being met by 3. d4 (if that is a risk), the second may not be quite the right square for the Knight. If you play the Closed Sicilian as White, this must be the best choice for you.

Example lines go:

After 2... d6:

(a) 3. d4 as in Hubner-Kasparov m1 1979

(b) 3. Nf3 f5

[or 3... Bg4 idea 4. g3 Bxf3 5. exf3 Nc6]

4. g3 Nf6 5. Bg2 Nc6 6. O-O Be7

[or 6... g6]

(c) 3. g3 f5

[or 3... Be6 4. Bg2 c6]

After 2...Nc6:

3. Nf3 f5

r+bqkbnr
pppp+-pp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-pp+-
-+P+-+-+
+-N-+N+-
PP-PPPPP
R-BQKB+R

4. d4 e4

r+bqkbnr
pppp+-pp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-+p+-
-+PPp+-+
+-N-+N+-
PP-+PPPP
R-BQKB+R

Now White has a number of moves:

(a) 5. Bg5

e.g. 5... Be7 6. Bxe7 Ngxe7 7. Nd2 Nxd4 8. Ndxe4 Nec6 9. Nd2 O-O 10. g3 d6 11. Bg2 f4 12. O-O fxg3 13. hxg3 Bg4

r+-q-rk+
ppp-+-pp
-+np-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+Pn-+b+
+-N-+-P-
PP-NPPB+
R-+Q+RK-

 

(b) 5. Ng5 h6

[or 5... Be7 6. Nh3 ]

[or 5... Nf6 6. e3 and now

6... h6

[6...g6]

7. Nh3 g5

r+bqkb-r
pppp+-+-
-+n+-n-p
+-+-+pp-
-+PPp+-+
+-N-P-+N
PP-+-PPP
R-BQKB+R

after 5...h6 White can retreat with

6. Nh3

[6...g5!?]]

or spuddle with

6. Nd5

 

(c) 5. Nd2

as in Miles-Chaves

 

Instead of the immediate 3...f5 Black can play more slowly e.g.

3... g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. e3 d6 6. Nge2

and now Black has tried:

6...f5

6...h5

Play in these hypermodern openings is more flexible and less forcing, so both sides have a lot of choice about their early move orders. I've tried to give an example of each line cited in the games below.

 

 

Example games in the Anglo-Dutch

System with 2...d6



Hubner - Kasparov (1, Hamburg) [A21] 1985

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. d4

Most folk used to think this was good for White... until this game!

3...exd4 4. Qxd4 Nf6 5. g3 Nc6 6. Qd2 Be6 7. Nd5 Ne5

r+-qkb-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-pbn-+
+-+Nn-+-
-+P+-+-+
+-+-+-P-
PP-QPP-P
R-B-KBNR

Creating trouble on c4

8. b3 Ne4 9. Qe3 Nc5 10. Bb2 c6 11. Nf4 Ng4

r+-qkb-r
pp+-+ppp
-+ppb+-+
+-n-+-+-
-+P+-Nn+
+P+-Q-P-
PB-+PP-P
R-+-KBNR

The pesky Knights keep hopping around, not letting Black settle.

12. Qd4 Ne4

Very alert

13. Bh3

[13. Nxe6 fxe6 14. Qxe4 Qa5+ 15. Kd1 Nxf2+]

13... Qa5+ 14. Kf1 Ngxf2 15. Bxe6 fxe6 16. Nxe6 Kd7 17. Nh3 Nxh3 18. Qxe4

r+-+-b-r
pp+k+-pp
-+ppN+-+
q-+-+-+-
-+P+Q+-+
+P+-+-Pn
PB-+P+-P
R-+-+K+R

Black's initiative persists.

18... Re8 19. Nc5+ Qxc5 20. Qg4+ Kc7 21. Qxh3

-+-+rb-r
ppk-+-pp
-+pp-+-+
+-q-+-+-
-+P+-+-+
+P+-+-PQ
PB-+P+-P
R-+-+K+R

21... Be7 22. Bxg7 Rhf8+ 23. Bxf8 Rxf8+ 24. Ke1 Qf2+ 25. Kd1 Qd4+ 26. Kc2 Qe4+ 27. Kd2 Bg5+ 28. Kc3 Qe5+

-+-+-r-+
ppk-+-+p
-+pp-+-+
+-+-q-b-
-+P+-+-+
+PK-+-PQ
P+-+P+-P
R-+-+-+R

0-1

 

Gonzalez-Rossolimo 1952.

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. e3 Be7 6. Nge2 c6 7. d4 O-O 8. b3 Nbd7 9. O-O h5 10. h4 Ng4 11. f3 Nh6 12. Ba3 Qe8 13. dxe5 dxe5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Qd2 Nc5

r+b+-rk+
pp+-q-p-
-+p+-+-n
+-n-pp+p
-+P+-+-P
+PN-PPP-
P+-QN+B+
R-+-+RK-

Black has more space.]

 

 

Korchnoi-German 1962.

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. b4 c6 6. b5 c5 !

Now White can't open a file on the Q-side.

7. Bb2 Nbd7 8. d3 g6 9. a4 a5 10. bxa6 Rxa6 11. Nf3 Bg7 12. Nd2 O-O 13. Nb5 Rf7 14. Bc3 Nf8 15. e3 Ne6 16. O-O g5 17. Qe2 Re7 18. Rfe1 g4 19. f4 gxf3 20. Nxf3 Nf8 21. Nd2 Ng6 22. Nb3 Bh6 23. a5 Ng4 24. Bd5+ Kh8 25. Qd2 Rg7 26. Kh1

-+bq-+-k
+p+-+-rp

r+-p-+nb
PNpBpp+-
-+P+-+n+
+NBPP-P-
-+-Q-+-P
R-+-R-+K

Black has his open lines and could create more with

26... f4 27. exf4 Nxf4

 

 

Zlotnikov-Minasian 1993

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. d3 Be7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O Kh8 8. b4

[After 8. Bd2 the ever-inventive Speelman did once try ...Na6 but 8...Qe8 is still Black's best]

8... Qe8 9. Bb2 Qh5 10. e3 Nc6 11. a3 Bd7 12. Nd2 Qh6

r+-+-r-k
pppbb-pp
-+np-n-q
+-+-pp+-
-PP+-+-+
P-NPP-P-
-B-N-PBP
R-+Q+RK-

Black is well-placed to build up on the K-side.

...0-1

 

 

Hallerod-Hearst 1960

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. d3 Be7

5... g6 is a Closed Sicilian position: see below

6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O Qe8

8. c5 c6 9. cxd6 Bxd6 10. b4 Kh8 11. Rb1 Nd5 12. Qb3 Be6

rn-+qr-k
pp+-+-pp
-+pbb+-+
+-+npp+-
-P-+-+-+
+QNP+NP-
P+-+PPBP
+RB-+RK-

= 13. Ng5 Nxc3 14. Qxc3 Bxa2 15. Ra1 Bg8 16. Bb2 Qe7 17. Nf3 Nd7 18. Ba3 a6 19. Nd2 Nb6 20. Rfb1 Nd5 21. Qb2 Nc7 22. Nc4 Nb5 23. Rc1 Bxc4 24. Rxc4 a5

r+-+-r-k
+p+-q-pp
-+pb-+-+
pn+-pp+-
-PR+-+-+
B-+P+-P-
-Q-+PPBP
R-+-+-K-

0-1 : a Queen's-side decision!

 

System with 2...Nc6

 

Miles-Chaves 1977

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d4 e4 5. Nd2 Nf6 6. e3 g6 7. Be2 Bg7 8. Rb1 a5 9. a3 O-O 10. b4 axb4 11. axb4 Ne7 12. Qb3 d6 13. b5 Kh8 14. Ba3 f4 15. Ncxe4 fxe3 16. fxe3 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 Bf5 18. Bd3

r+-q-r-k
+pp-n-bp
-+-p-+p+
+P+-+b+-
-+PPN+-+
BQ+BP-+-
-+-+-+PP
+R+-K-+R

18... Nd5 19. O-O

[19. cxd5 Bxe4 20. Bxe4 Qh4+ 21. Kd1 Qxe4 22. Rb2]

19... Nxe3 20. Rf3 Qh4 21. g3 Qg4 22. Rxe3 Rxa3 23. Qxa3 Qh3 24. Kh1 Bxe4+ 0-1

White resigned here but 25. Rxe4 Rf2 26. Re8+ Bf8 27. Rxf8+ Rxf8 28. Qa2 looked worth trying first!

 

Bruno-Kurajica 1985

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d3 Nf6 5. Bg2 Bb4 6. Bd2 O-O 7. Nf3 d6 8. a3 Bxc3 9. Bxc3 Qe8 10. O-O Qh5 11. Qd2

r+b+-rk+
ppp-+-pp
-+np-n-+
+-+-pp+q
-+P+-+-+
P-BP+NP-
-P-QPPBP
R-+-+RK-

11... f4 12. gxf4 h6 13. fxe5 dxe5 14. d4 Bh3 15. dxe5 Rad8 16. Qf4

[16. Qc2 Bxg2 17. Kxg2 Ng4 18. Rfd1 Rxf3 19. exf3

[19. Rxd8+ Nxd8 20. Kxf3 Qh3+ 21. Ke4 Nxf2+ 22. Kd5 Qe6+ 23. Kd4 Nc6+ 24. Ke3]

19... Qxh2+ 20. Kf1 Ne3+]

16... Bxg2 17. Kxg2 Nd5 18. Qc1 Nf4+ 0-1

 

 

Darga-Herter 1968

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d4 e4 5. Ng5

Black now plays more quietly:

5...Be7 6. Nh3 Bf6 7. e3 d6 8. Nf4 Nge7 9. g4 Ng6 10. Nfd5 Bh4 11. Bg2 O-O 12. O-O Nce7 13. gxf5 Bxf5 14. Nf4 Nxf4 15. exf4 d5 16. cxd5 Nxd5 17. Nxe4 Bxe4 18. Bxe4 Nxf4 19. Qg4 Qxd4 20. Bf3

r+-+-rk+
ppp-+-pp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-q-nQb
+-+-+B+-
PP-+-P-P
R-B-+RK-

20... h5 0-1

21. Qxh4 Ne2+]

 

 

Seirawan-Browne 1979

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 f5 4. d4 e4 5. Ng5 h6 6. Nh3 g5

r+bqkbnr
pppp+-+-
-+n+-+-p
+-+-+pp-
-+PPp+-+
+-N-+-+N
PP-+PPPP
R-BQKB+R

This is a noisier line!

7. f3 exf3 8. exf3 Bg7 9. d5 Qe7+ 10. Kd2 Nd4 11. Bd3 Kd8 12. Ng1 b5 13. Nge2 bxc4 14. Bxc4 Qc5 15. Kd3 Rb8

-rbk-+nr
p-pp+-b-
-+-+-+-p
+-qP+pp-
-+Bn-+-+
+-NK+P+-
PP-+N+PP
R-BQ+-+R

16. Be3 ?

16... Qxc4+ 17. Kxc4 Ba6+ 18. Nb5 Nxb5 0-1

[19. Qa4 Na3+ 20. Kc5 d6+ 21. Kc6 Ne7#]

[19. Nd4 Nxd4+ 20. Kc3 Ne2+ 21. Kd2 Rxb2+ 22. Ke1 Bc3+ 23. Kf1

[23. Bd2 Nf4 24. Rg1 Nd3+ 25. Ke2 Rxd2+ 26. Qxd2 Bxd2 27. Kxd2]

23... Nf4+ 24. Kg1 Rxg2#]

 

Reversed Closed Sicilian

Grunberg-Kasparov simul.1987

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 d6 3. g3 f5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. d3

We have seen all this above. Now

5... g6

is a Closed Sicilian position

6. e4 Bg7 7. Nge2 O-O 8. O-O c6 9. h3 Be6 10. exf5 gxf5 11. Be3 Qe7 12. Qd2 Kh8 13. Rae1 Nbd7 14. f4 Rg8

r+-+-+rk
pp+nq-bp
-+ppbn-+
+-+-pp+-
-+P+-P-+
+-NPB-PP
PP-QN+B+
+-+-RRK-

Black's position is fine.

15. Kh2 Qf7 16. Bf3 Rae8 17. b4 e4 18. dxe4 fxe4 19. Bxe4 Bxh3 20. Kxh3 Nxe4 21. Qd3 Bxc3 22. Qxc3+ Nxc3 0-1

 

 


Hodgson-Short 1986

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. e3 d6 6. Nge2

6... h5 7. h3 h4 8. g4 f5 9. gxf5 Bxf5 10. d4 exd4 11. Nxd4 Nxd4 12. exd4 c6 13. Be3 Nf6 14. Qd2 Qd7

r+-+k+-r
pp+q+-b-
-+pp-np+
+-+-+b+-
-+PP-+-p
+-N-B-+P
PP-Q-PB+
R-+-K-+R

15. O-O-O Kf7 16. Bg5 b5 17. cxb5 cxb5 18. Bxa8 Rxa8 19. Qe2 Rc8 20. a3 a5 21. f3 b4 22. Kd2 bxc3+ 23. bxc3 Qb7

-+r+-+-+
+q+-+kb-
-+-p-np+
p-+-+bB-
-+-P-+-p
P-P-+P+P
-+-KQ+-+
+-+R+-+R

0-1

 

 

Pierson-Calverley 1983

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. e3 d6 6. Nge2

6... h5 7. d4 e4 8. a3 Nf6 9. O-O O-O 10. b4 Ne7 11. Bb2 g5 12. d5 Ng6 13. Na4 Qe7 14. Rc1 f4 15. Bxf6 Rxf6 16. Nd4 Ne5 17. Bxe4 Bh3 18. Re1 fxg3 19. fxg3 Raf8 20. Qc2 Qf7 21. Qb1 Rf2 22. Ne6 Rg2+ 0-1

23. Kh1

[23. Bxg2 Qf2+ 24. Kh1 Qxg2#]

23... Qf2 24. Bxh7+]

 

 

|Psakhis -Kasparov, 199|

One of the best example games I have on file for the Reversed Closed Sicilian is this one

1. c4 g6 2. Nc3 Bg7 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 d6 5. Nf3 e5 6. d3 f5 7. O-O Nf6

r+bqk+-r
ppp-+-bp
-+np-np+
+-+-pp+-
-+P+-+-+
+-NP+NP-
PP-+PPBP
R-BQ+RK-

8. Rb1 h6 9. b4 O-O 10. b5 Ne7 11. a4 Be6 12. Ba3 Rc8

-+rq-rk+
ppp-n-b-
-+-pbnpp
+P+-pp+-
P+P+-+-+
B-NP+NP-
-+-+PPBP
+R+Q+RK-

Black does not rush but secures the Q-side.

13. Nd2 b6 14. e3 g5 15. d4 exd4 16. exd4 f4

-+rq-rk+
p-p-n-b-
-p-pbn-p
+P+-+-p-
P+PP-p-+
B-N-+-P-
-+-N-PBP
+R+Q+RK-

17. Re1 Bg4 18. Nf3 Qd7 19. c5 Rce8 20. Rc1 Nf5 21. Qd3 Kh8 22. cxd6 cxd6 23. Rxe8 Qxe8 24. Rf1 Qh5

-+-+-r-k
p-+-+-b-
-p-p-n-p
+P+-+npq
P+-P-pb+
B-NQ+NP-
-+-+-PBP
+-+-+RK-

The Black pieces hover like vultures

25. Ne4 Nxe4 26. Qxe4 Bh3 27. Ne5 Bxg2 28. Kxg2 g4 29. Bxd6 Rf6 30. Bb8 Qh3+

-B-+-+-k
p-+-+-b-
-p-+-r-p
+P+-Nn+-
P+-PQpp+
+-+-+-Pq
-+-+-PKP
+-+-+R+-

0-1

 

C Reti Opening and King's Indian Attack

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPPPPPPP
RNBQKB+R

Again, White doesn't want to rush into the centre without preparation, and plays Nf3 first to stop you playing ...e5.

 


C1 Playing solidly against 1. Nf3

David Norwood, who is a specialist in the King's Indian Attack, reckons that Black equalises easily in this line which:

"...offers excellent chances of equality. Black's plan is extremely logical - to limit the scope of the fianchetto bishop with ...d5 & ...c6, then develops the B to g4 where it can either exchange or retreat. I predict it will remain difficult for KIA players to prove any advantage in this system.

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 c6 3. Bg2 Bg4

rn-qkbnr
pp+-pppp
-+p+-+-+
+-+p+-+-
-+-+-+b+
+-+-+NP-
PPPPPPBP
RNBQK-+R

4. O-O

[4. d3 Nd7 5. O-O Ngf6 6. c4 dxc4 7. dxc4 e5

r+-qkb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-n-+
+-+-p-+-
-+P+-+b+
+-+-+NP-
PP-+PPBP
RNBQ+RK-

8. Nc3 Be7 9. b3 O-O 10. Bb2 Re8 11. Qc2 Bf8 12. h3 Bh5 13. Nh4 Nc5 14. Rad1 Qc7 15. g4 Bg6 16. Nxg6 hxg6 17. e3 a5

r+-+rbk+
+pq-+pp-
-+p+-np+
p-n-p-+-
-+P+-+P+
+PN-P-+P
PBQ+-PB+
+-+R+RK-

Todorcevic-Rodriguez, Salamanca 1990 ...Drawn (47)]

4... Nd7 5. d3 Ngf6 6. Qe1

[6. Nbd2 e5 7. e4 Bd6 8. Re1 O-O 9. Nf1 Bh5 10. Ne3 Re8 11. Nf5 Bf8 12. c3 dxe4 13. dxe4 Nc5

r+-qrbk+
pp+-+ppp
-+p+-n-+
+-n-pN+b
-+-+P+-+
+-P-+NP-
PP-+-PBP
R-BQR-K-

14. Qxd8 Raxd8 Fahrner-Luther, Graz 1991 ...0-1]

6... e5

r+-qkb-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-n-+
+-+pp-+-
-+-+-+b+
+-+P+NP-
PPP+PPBP
RNB-QRK-

7. e4 dxe4 8. dxe4 Bc5 9. b4

[9. Nbd2 Qc7 10. Nc4 Be6 11. Qe2 b5 12. Ncd2

r+-+k+-r
p-qn+ppp
-+p+bn-+
+pb-p-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+NP-
PPPNQPBP
R-B-+RK-

Dizdarevic-Huss, Swiss 1990 12... O-O = Norwood]

9... Bd6 10. Na3 Qe7 11. c3 b5 12. Nc2 a5 13. bxa5 O-O 14. c4 Be6 15. cxb5 cxb5 16. Nh4 Bc5 17. Nf5 Qd8 18. Qd2 Qxa5 19. Qg5

r+-+-rk+
+-+n+ppp
-+-+bn-+
qpb-pNQ-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+-P-
P+N+-PBP
R-B-+RK-

|Drawn: Vaganian-Dorfman, Moscow 199|

 

You may be interested in this excellent game, which features our system with colours reversed.


Smyslov,V (2565) - Nunn,J (2565) [A48] (Tilburg 34/91), 1982

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bg5 Bg7 4. Nbd2 O-O

[4... c5 5. Bxf6 Bxf6 6. Ne4 Bxd4 7. Nxd4 cxd4 8. Qxd4 O-O 9. c4 Nc6 10. Qd2 d6 11. Nc3 += Smyslov-Ernst, London 1988]

5. e4 d6 6. c3 h6 7. Bh4

rnbq-rk+
ppp-ppb-
-+-p-npp
+-+-+-+-
-+-PP+-B
+-P-+N+-
PP-N-PPP
R-+QKB+R

Does driving the bishop back have any effect in this formation? Yes - it does further weaken the kingside fortress.


7...c6 8.Bb5 Bd7 9. O-O a6 10. Bc4 e5 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Re1

Overprotection of e4 frees up the minor pieces for more useful tasks.

12... Qe8

[12... b5 13. Bf1 followed by an eventual a2-a4 would put strong pressure on the queenside.]

13. a4 Nh5 14. Nb3 g5 15. Bg3 Rd8 16. Nfd2

-+-rqrk+
+ppb+pb-
p+n+-+-p
+-+-p-pn
P+B+P+-+
+NP-+-B-
-P-N-PPP
R-+QR-K-

White's pieces have been quckly transferred to the queenside. Black's pieces, especially the offside knight, cannot get there so quickly.


|6... Nxg3 17. hxg3 Kh8 18. Qe2 Qe7 19. Nf1|

The exchange of the Black knight for the Bg3 has created new opportunities on the kingside. Smyslov is the master of harmonic play - his pieces are often ready to switch to new targets quickly.

19... Qf6 20. Nc5 Bc8 21. Ne3 Ne7 22. a5 Qg6

Black has chosen to sue the Bc8 to defend the queenside, but the heavy guns are all on the kingside, and White controls a bit more of the center. But before foraging on the queenside, Smyslov squashes the counterplay.

23. g4! b6?!

Black is paralyzed on the kingside, unable to transfer the knight to f4 due to the placement of the queen at g6. But this sacrifice of a queenside pawn leads to disaster. There is nothing more rueful than a lost pawn formation. Black could resign without remorse

24. Nf5! Nxf5

[24... bxc5 25. Nxe7 Qd6 26. Nxc8 Rxc8 27. Bxa6+/- ]

25. gxf5 Qc6 26. Nxa6 Bxa6 27. Bxa6 bxa5 28. Rxa5

Now White has an extra pawn and better bishop. The rest is easy for a player of Smyslov's caliber.

28... Ra8 29. Rea1 Rfd8 30. Bc4 Rxa5 31. Rxa5 Kg8 32. Ra6 Qd7 33. Bd5 Qe7 34. Qh5 Rd6 35. Rxd6 cxd6 36. b4 1-0

Resigns; a tale of two bishops...

 

C2 Playing actively against 1. Nf3

There is a slight problem here:

1. Nf3 f5

can be met by the awkward gambit

2. d3 Nf6 3. e4 fxe4 4. Ng5

So you may prefer to play into you line with

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 c6 3. g3 e6.

The other way to play into the Dutch allows some transpositions:

1. Nf3 e6

2. g3

[2. e4 d5 is a French Defence which is OK for Black]

[2... c5 is a Sicilian: White can play the King's Indian Attack with 3. d3 or play it open with 3. d4 e.g. 3...cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. a3 Be7 7. Be2 O-O 8. O-O d5 9. exd5 Nxd5]

[2. b3 Be7]

2... f5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. O-O Be7

rnbqk+-r
ppppb-pp
-+-+pn-+
+-+-+p+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+NP-
PPPPPPBP
RNBQ+RK-

Both sides are quietly getting on with their own systems. The trouble with meeting White's flexible setup with the Dutch is that Black may be denied the outpost on e4 and White can even try to blow up the pawn structure by playing e2-e4.

5. d3

[5. b3 c5 6. Bb2 O-O 7. c4 Nc6 8. Nc3 e5 9. e3 d6 10. d4 e4 11. Ne1 Qe8 12. Nd5 Bd8 13. dxc5 dxc5

r+bbqrk+
pp+-+-pp
-+n+-n-+
+-pN+p+-
-+P+p+-+
+P+-P-P-
PB-+-PBP
R-+QNRK-

This is better for White]

5... O-O 6. Nbd2 d6 7. e4 fxe4 8. dxe4 e5 9. c3 Qe8 10. Nh4 Nc6 11. Nc4 Qh5 12. Qxh5 Nxh5 13. Nf5 Bd8

r+bb-rk+
ppp-+-pp
-+np-+-+
+-+-pN+n
-+N+P+-+
+-P-+-P-
PP-+-PBP
R-B-+RK-

With about equal chances.

 

 

D Sokolsky opening (Polish)

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-P-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
P+PPPPPP
RNBQKBNR

This is an oddly effective line; White stops active play with ...c5 and prepares to bring the Bb2 onto the long diagonal.

 

D1 Playing solidly against 1. b4

I think the most solid system is

1. b4 e5 2. Bb2 Bxb4 3. Bxe5 Nf6

when I know of no way for White to secure the advantage.

White can try

1. b4 e5 2. a3

but this is fairly harmless:

2...d5 3. Bb2 f6

should be fine for Black

 

 

D2 Playing actively against 1. b4

Of course you can play

1. b4 f5

but the theory on this line is hardly explored.

White may play d3 at some point which may rob you of some of your best ideas.

 

E Nimzo-Larsen Opening

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+P+-+-+-
P+PPPPPP
RNBQKBNR

This is a flexible line, aiming at first to post the Bc1 on b2, pointing at the e5 point and beyond at the Black King's-side.

The Bb2 needs watching but you should be OK in this opening.

 

E1 Playing solidly against 1. b3

1. b3 d5 2. Bb2 Nf6

is fine for Black

 

 

E2 Playing actively against 1. b3

Go for it...

1. b3 f5

...and Black should not be without play.

1. b3 f5 2. Bb2 Nf6 3. d3 d6 4. e4 e5 5. exf5 Bxf5 6. Ne2 Nc6 7. d4 Be7 8. Ng3 Bg6 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. Qxd8+ Rxd8 11. Bb5 O-O
-+-r-rk+
ppp-b-pp
-+n+-nb+
+B+-p-+-
-+-+-+-+
+P+-+-N-
PBP+-PPP
RN+-K-+R

Black has active play and won in 23 moves! -- KEENE]

 

 

F Various other openings

This obviously can transpose to other openings, and it is probably best to try to do just that.

 

F1. Benko's Opening, 1.g3

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-P-
PPPPPP-P
RNBQKBNR

1...d5

and

1...f5

both look playable. White may well transpose into lines considered above.

 


F2. Bird's opening, 1. f4

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-P-+
+-+-+-+-
PPPPP+PP
RNBQKBNR

The obvious snag is, you can't play the Dutch against this:

1. f4 f5 2. e4

is awkward.

But why not play the most awkward lines for White: the From Gambit.

1. f4 e5

Now

2. fxe4 d6 3. exd6 Bxd6

gives you a development lead and free play for your pieces. Instead:

2. e4

transposes into the King's Gambit, which I think most Bird players will do. See the booklet on Playing Black in e4 openings

 

F3. The Dunst, 1. Nc3

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPPPPPPP
R-BQKBNR

A while ago I wouldn't have bothered with this odd-looking opening, but it has become a bit of a secret weapon among those in the know. What to play against it depends on what else you play; it's probably the best of the unusual lines.

1...f5 walks into 2. e4.

1...c5 offers a Sicilian, and after 1...d5 2. e4 you can with 2...d5 offer a Caro-Kann or with 2...e6, a French. Perhaps 2...dxe4 3. Nxe4 and ...c6 may appeal.

1...d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2

is a well-known sequence, after which

3...e5 4. Ng3 Be6

Else 5. Bc4 will follow. This looks like Black's best idea to me.

Example game in the Dunst:

Ekebjaerg,Ove - Strand,Torger cr Nielsen-mem, 1987

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 Be6 5. Nf3 Nd7 6. c3 c5 7. cxd4 cxd4 8. Be2 Bd6 9. O-O h5 10. d3

r+-qk+nr
pp+n+pp-
-+-bb+-+
+-+-p-+p
-+-pP+-+
+-+P+NN-
PP-+BPPP
R-BQ+RK-

This doesn't look to me very promising for White, although White did win.

 

 

 

F4. Grob's opening, 1. g4

rnbqkbnr
pppppppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+-
PPPPPP-P
RNBQKBNR

The idea of this odd-looking move is...

1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 Bxg4 3. c4!

...when the pin on the b7 point may be embarrassing.

The two best-known players of this line, Henri Grob and Claude Bloodgood, agree that one of the most awkward lines for White is

1. g4 e5

with the idea 2. Bg2 h5! when the pawn cannot advance to g5.

Grob himself played this against 1. g4. So Bloodgood reckons White's best try is

2. d3

To be honest, many Grob players have no idea that this is a known line, all they know about is the ...Bxg4 variation. So they may be out-tricked in their own opening!

 

Some sample lines in this rare opening:

Ott - Grob, Corr

1. g4 e5 2. Bg2 h5 3. gxh5 Rxh5 4. e3 Rh8 5. c4 f5 6. Qc2 g6 7. Nc3 c6 8. Nge2 Nf6 9. d4 d6 =

 

Hug - Grob, Corr

1. g4 e5 2. Bg2 h5 3. gxh5 Rxh5 4. e3 Nf6 5. c4 c6 6. Nc3 d5 7. cxd5 Rg5 8. Bf3 cxd5 9. Qa4+ Nc6 10. d3 Rg6 11. e4 d4 12. Nd5 Be6 13. Qb5 Qd7 14. Bd2 Bxd5 15. exd5 Nb4 16. Qxd7+ Kxd7 17. Bxb4 Bxb4+ 18. Kd1 Kd6 = [or 18... Bd6]

 

Grob - Aebi (corr) & Analysis

1. g4 e5 2. d3! d5 3. Bg2

[3. g5 Be7 4. h4 h6 =+]

3... Bxg4 4. c4

Now this gambit is not as good for White as in the lines without d3 and ...e5.

4...Bb4+ 5. Nd2 c6 6. cxd5 Ne7

[6... cxd5 7. Qb3 Nc6 8. Bxd5 Qe7 9. h3 Bh5 dr]

7. dxc6 Nbxc6 8. a3 =

 

Grob - Stingelin+ Analysis, 1993

1. g4 e5 2. d3! d5 3. Bg2 c6 4. h3 Ne7 5. Nf3 Ng6 6. Nc3 f5 =/+

[6... h6 was the game: 7. e4 !]

If this sly system doesn't appeal you might fancy the emerging main line approach:

Basman - Keene, Benedictine, 1981

1. g4 d5 2. h3 e5 3. Bg2 c6 4. d4 e4 5. c4 Bd6 6. Nc3 Ne7 7. g5

Basman has also tried:

[7. Qb3 O-O 8. Bg5 f6 9. cxd5 cxd5 10. Nxd5 Be6 11. Nxe7+ Qxe7 12. d5 Bf7 13. Be3 Na6

r+-+-rk+
pp+-qbpp
n+-b-p-+
+-+P+-+-
-+-+p+P+
+Q+-B-+P
PP-+PPB+
R-+-K-NR

-+ Keene]

[7. Bg5 f6 8. Bd2 unclear, (Basman - Kudrin, Benedictine, 1981)]

7... Be6 8. h4 Nf5 9. Bh3 O-O 10. cxd5 cxd5 11. Nxd5

rn-q-rk+
pp+-+ppp
-+-bb+-+
+-+N+nP-
-+-Pp+-P
+-+-+-+B
PP-+PP-+
R-BQK-NR

11... Ng3 12. Nf6+ gxf6 13. fxg3 Bxg3+ 14. Kf1 Nc6 15. Be3 Nb4 16. Kg2 Nd5 17. Kxg3 Nxe3 18. Qd2 Qd6+ 19. Kf2 Qf4+ 20. Nf3 exf3

r+-+-rk+
pp+-+p+p
-+-+bp-+
+-+-+-P-
-+-P-q-P
+-+-np+B
PP-QPK-+
R-+-+-+R

0-1

21. Qxe3 Qxh4+ 22. Kxf3 Bd5+

 

 

Also ran: 1. e3, 1. a3, 1. a4, 1. h4, 1. f3

I can't imagine these giving you any trouble: You can certainly play your usual Colle or Dutch, and various 1. e4 lines can be played with colours reversed.

1. e3 Van T'Kruy's Opening hopes for a reversed French. 1...d5 is OK for Black.

1. a3 has some idea of playing b2-b4; just 1...d5 and 2...c6 in reply is a good start for playing fast or slow. You can also blow up the Queen's-side with ...a5 if White does play b4.

1. a4 might tempt you to 1...e5 if that's what you usually play.

1. h4 e5 must be all right too.

1. f3 is a bit of a joker; 1...d5 or 1...e5 should give you an easy game.

Index of Games

Pribyl - Penrose (Nice) 1974 [*]

Marshall,F - Tarrasch,S, Nuremberg, 1895 [*]

Ottaviani,W - Liying,P (Novi-14) [D52] Cambridge Springs: loose Bg5, 1990 [*]

Buthali,D - Figueroa,C (Novi-14) [D52] cambridge springs: loose Bg5, 1990 [*]

Borovikov,V - Shabanov,Y (Podolsk) [D52] Cambridge Springs: Black grabs material, 1990 [*]

Duemer,K - Meyer,Frh (2.BLSW) [D52] cambridge springs: Q-side attack, 1989
[*]

El Mezwaghi,H - Mubarak,A (Novi-12) [D52] cambridge springs: Queen's-side majority in EG, 1990 [*]

Michaelsen,N - Hort,V (FRG-ch) [D52] cambridge springs: break on Q-side, 1989 [*]

Perez,A - Perera,M [D52] cambridge springs: chances with NN, 1989 [*]

Lengyel-Karpov, Moscow 1972 [*]

Tukmakov-Korchnoi Leningrad 1973 [*]

Arkell-Teichmann 1985 [*]

Burn - Teichmann (Hastings) [D46] 1895 [*]

Miralles,G - Granda Zuniga,J [D45] 1989 [*]

Rohde,M - Shabalov,A (8) [*]

[D45] Philadelphia, 1990
[*]

Hegeler,F - Wockenfuss,K [D46] 2BLN, 1989 [*]

Kraai,J - Donaldson,J (2) [D46] American, 1989 [*]

Karpov - Tal [D46] Moscow, 1973 [*]

Plachetka,T - Drtina,M (5) [D46] Trnava, 1989 [*]

Curtis-Teichmann 1985 [*]

Serebrjanik-Maximenko 1991 [*]

Kasparov - Short (10) [D35] WCh, 1994 [*]

Steinbacher,M - van der Sterren,P (5) [D36] Ostend, 1989 [*]

??-?? [D34] [*]

Davidovic,A - Smagin,S (4) [D36] It-open, Dortmund, 1989
[*]

Von Gleich,A - Ekstroem,R (1) [D36] Lugano, 1989 [*]

Yermolinsky - Shipman,W (3) [D36] MCC, 1989 [*]

Deze,A - Tadic,K (1) [D35] Novi, 1989 [*]

Paduch,A - Ghafour,Y (8) [D35] A.Kotov memorial, Singapore, 1990 [*]

Tisdall,J - Inkiov,V (5) [D36] Gausdal, 1990 [*]

Rabinovitch - Botvinnik (Ussr Ch'p, 1927) [*]

Steiner - Botvinnik, Groningen, 1946 [*]

Flohr - Botvinnik (10) Match, 1933 [*]

Yudovitch - Botvinnik, 1934 [*]

Martin - Troger [A94] 1995
[*]

Karayannis-Bellin 1993 [*]

Menadue - Pert 1995 [*]

Langeweg,K - Perez Garcia,H [A80] Wijk-B, 1986 [*]

Sparreboom,W - Bellin,R [A80] Guernsey op, 1988 [*]

Barczyczyn - Vasiukov,E [A80] Bled op, 1989 [*]

Ligterink,G (2470) - Van Heste,J (2290) [A80] NLD-ch, 1987 [*]

Maksimovic,S (2345) - Akhmilovskaya,E (2420) [A80] Sochi, 1987 [*]

Cazzaniga,W - Speck,H [A80] Mendrisio op, 1988 [*]

Kurajica [A13] Agincourt Defence (French-English), 1995 [*]

Hubner - Kasparov (1, Hamburg) [A21] 1985
[*]

Gonzalez-Rossolimo 1952. [*]

Korchnoi-German 1962. [*]

Zlotnikov-Minasian 1993 [*]

Hallerod-Hearst 1960 [*]

Miles-Chaves 1977 [*]

Bruno-Kurajica 1985 [*]

Darga-Herter 1968 [*]

Seirawan-Browne 1979 [*]

Grunberg-Kasparov simul.1987 [*]

Hodgson-Short 1986
[*]

Pierson-Calverley 1983 [*]

Psakhis - Kasparov, 1990 [*]

Smyslov,V (2565) - Nunn,J (2565) [A48] (Tilburg 34/91), 1982 [*]

Ekebjaerg,Ove - Strand,Torger cr Nielsen-mem, 1987 [*]

Ott - Grob, Corr [*]

Hug - Grob, Corr [*]

Grob - Aebi (corr) & Analysis [*]

Grob - Stingelin+ Analysis, 1993 [*]

Basman - Keene, Benedictine, 1981 [*]

Chess Quotes

"If chess is a science, it's a most inexact one. If chess is an art, it's too exacting to be seen as one. If chess is a sport, it's too aesoteric. If chess is a game, it's too demanding to be *just* a game. If chess is a mistress, she's a demanding one. If chess is a passion, it's a rewarding one. If chess is life, it's a sad one. "