Playing White against odd Black defences after 1.e4 (1)

Black avoids 2...Nc6 or plays one of the semi-open defences

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An Exeter Junior Chess Club booklet Edition 1., December, 99

 

Bibliography:

Dunnington, How to play the King's Indian Attack

Evans, The Chess Opening for You

Hodgson/Day, The Grand Prix Attack

Hort, Alekhin's Defence (inc. Nimzovitch Defence)

Karpov, The Semi-Open Game in Action

Kasparov/Keene, Batsford Chess Openings 2

Keene et al. Understanding the Caro-Kann Defence

Levy/Keene, An Opening Repertoire for the Attacking Club Player

Nunn, The Complete Pirc

Pachman, Semi-Open Chess

Schiller, How to play the King's Indian Attack

Solitis/Hall, The King's Indian Attack

Walker, Chess Openings for Juniors

 

Various magazines and other books

 

Introduction

A. Piece attacks against the common half-open defences

A1. Piece attacks vs. Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6: 1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4

Avoiding with 4...Nb6

Avoiding with 4... Nxc3

Defending with 4... c6

Defending with 4... e6

Example games A1

A2. Piece attacks vs. Caro-Kann Defence

A2.1 Solid line with 4... Nd7

A2.2. Lines with 4... Nf6

A2.2.1 Tartakower Variation, 5... exf6

A2.2.2 Bronstein-Larsen line, 5...gxf6

A2.3 Classical Variation with 4...Bf5

Example games A2

A3. Piece attacks vs. French 1. e4 e6: 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 (Alekhin-Chatard Attack)

A3.1. Rubinstein Variation 3...dxe4 4. Nxe4

A3.1.1 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Nf6

A3.1.2 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Bd7

A3.1.3 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Nd7

A3.2. Guimard Variation 3. ... Nc6

A3. 3. Classical Variation, 3...Nf6

A3.3.1. The Burn Variation, 4... dxe4

A3.3.2. The MacCutcheon Variation, 4... Bb4

A3.3.3. The Classical Variation 4... Be7 (and Alekhin Chatard attack with 6. h4)

A3.4. The Winawer variation, 3... Bb4 and Alekhin Gambit 4. Nge2

Example games A3

A3.3.3 Examples of the Alekhin-Chatard Attack

A3.4 Examples of the Alekhin Gambit in the Winawer Variation

A3. Example of other French variations

A4. Piece attacks vs. Pirc/Modern 1. e4 ...d6/...g6: 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Be3

Example Games A4

A4.1. Examples with Bc4

A4.2. Examples with Be3

A5. Piece attacks vs. Sicilian: lines with piece play

A5.1. Ideas with Be2

A5.2. Ideas with Bb5

Example games A5

A5.1. Examples with Be2

A5.2. Examples with Bb5

B. Slow attacks with f4 against the common half-open defences

B1. Playing f4 vs. Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6: 1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 and 3. f4

Example games B1

B2. Playing f4 vs. Caro-Kann 1. e4 c6: 1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. f4 (a line of the Dunst opening, 1.Nc3)

Example games B2

B3. Playing f4 vs. French 1. e4 e6: 1. e4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. f4 (a line of the Dunst opening, 1.Nc3)

Example games B3

B4. Playing f4 vs. Pirc/Modern 1. e4 ...d6/...g6: 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. f4 (Austrian Attack)

Example games B4

B5. Playing f4 vs. Sicilian (a) 1. e4 c5 Grand Prix attack

Example games B5a

B5. Playing f4 vs. Sicilian (b)Traditional Closed Sicilian

Example games B5b

C. King's Indian Attack against the common half-open defences

Introduction to the King's Indian Attack

C1. KIA vs. Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6: 1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 and 3. g3/Bg2

Example games C1

C2. KIA vs. Caro-Kann 1. e4 c6: 1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2

C2.1. Caro-Kann with 3... dxe4

C2.2. Caro-Kann with 3... Nd7

C2.3. Caro-Kann with 3... Nf6

C2.4. Caro-Kann with 3... e5

C2.5. Caro-Kann with 3...g6

Example games C2

C3. KIA vs. French 1. e4 e6: 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2

C3.1 Variations with 4. g3

C3.2 Variations with 4. Ngf6

Example games C3

C4. KIA vs. Pirc/Modern 1. e4 ...d6/...g6: 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nge2 and 5. g3, 6. Bg2

Example games C4

C5. KIA vs. Sicilian

C5.1 KIA Sicilian with 2...d6

C5.2 KIA Sicilian with ...e6 and ...g6

Example games C5

D. A single repertoire for attacking the unusual semi-open defences

D1. Center Counter (Scandanavian) 1...d5

D1.1. Advance with 2...d4

D1.2. Exchange with 2...dxe4

Example games D1

D2. Gurgenidze Defence ...c6/...d5/...g6

Example games D2

D3. Nimzovitch Defence

Example games D3

D4. Other defences

D4(a) 1...b6 ( Owen's Defence )

D4(b) St.George's Defence 1...a6,

D4(c) the Borg Defence 1. e4 g5

Example games D4

E. A repertoire for attacking the unusual 1...e5 defences

E1. Hungarian Defence

E2. Philidor Defence

E2.1 Philidor Defence with 3...Nd7

E2.1.1 Philidor Defence with 4...Be7

E2.1.2 Philidor Defence with 4...h6

E2.1.3 Philidor Defence with 4...Ngf6

E2.1.4 Philidor Defence with 4...c6

E2.2 Philidor Defence with 3...Nf6

E2.3 Philidor Defence with 3...exd4

E2.4 Philidor counter-gambit 3...f5

E3 Latvian Gambit 2... f5

Example Games E

 

Introduction

The repertoires below offer you three ways of playing against most of the semi-open defences, and also tell you what to do against some of the less common lines after 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3.

The three approaches are:

­ Fast attacking game with pieces

­ Slower attacking game with f4

­ King's Indian Attack with g3

Which you choose will depend on what sort of player you are. It may also depend on what you hope to play after 1. e4 e5.

Fast attacking game with pieces

­ Giuoco Piano (my main recomendation for junior players) or

­ Scotch Game

Slower attacking game with f4

­ Vienna Gambit or

­ King's Gambit)

King's Indian Attack with g3

­ KIA with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. g3 or

­ in the Vienna 1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3

Sadly, the KIA lines have no real force and are not good lines to adopt against 1...e5. But the point is, how well does your chosen repertoire fit together? Once I used to play the following lines, together with the King's Gambit:

Alekhin

1. e4 Nf6

Chase variation

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. c5 Nd5 5. Bc4 e6 6. Nc3

Caro-Kann

1. e4 c6

Panov-Botvinnik Attack

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4

French

1. e4 e6

Advance Variation

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5

Pirc/Modern

1. e4 ...d6/...g6

King's Indian Attack

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nge2 and 5. g3, 6. Bg2

Sicilian

1. e4 c5

Chamaeleon Variation

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 ... 3. Nge2

This was an awful lot to keep track of, but more importantly, it didn't really combine well. Against the Alekhin I played fast, against the Caro I played medium, against the French and Pirc I played slow; the Panov line is main-line established theory with lots to learn and keep track of, the Chamaeleon is a new and obscure line where you have to think at the board.

Now, I'm sure a better idea, and the right idea, is to play similarly against each opening. For example, if you like gambits and play the Danish Gambit against 1...e5, try and find a gambit against the lot....

Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6

1. e4 Nf6 2. Bc4 Nxe4 3. Bxf7+ Kxf7 4. Qh5+ g6 5. Qd5+

Caro-Kann 1. e4 c6

Fantasie Variation

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. f3 e5 4. Nf3 exd4 5. Bc4

French 1. e4 e6

Advance Variation, Milner Barry Gambit

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qb6 6. Bd3

Pirc/Modern

1. e4 ...d6/...g6

I don't know any gambits for White in the Pirc but against the Modern you can try... the Monkey's Bum!

1. e4 g6 2. Bc4 d6 3. Qf3 Nf6 4. d4 e5 5. Nh3

Sicilian 1. e4 c5

Morra Gambit: 1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 or 3. ... Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bc4 Qc7 6. Qe2

I think neither the Alekhin line nor the Monkey's Bum are really any good, but at least we're thinking along the right lines, even if this isn't the repertoire we settle on.

Here's a repertoire based on pawn advances and space advantages:

Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6

Four pawns variation 1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. d4 d6 5. f4

Caro-Kann 1. e4 c6

Advance Variation 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5

French 1. e4 e6

Advance Variation 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5

Pirc/Modern

1. e4 ...d6/...g6

Three Pawns Attack 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. c3 g6 4. f4

Sicilian 1. e4 c5

Big Clamp Variation 1. e4 c5 2. d3 (...) 3. f4

 

Now, what sort of player are you? Whether you like lively piece attacks, slow pawn advances that you can use to force open lines or more flexible systems, there is a repertoire here for you.

Let's have a look at some variations that fit together.

Defence

Piece attack

Slow attack with f4

King's Indian Attack

 

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Alekhin

1. e4 Nf6

1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3.exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4

1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 and 3.f4 (sadly, this line has no real force and is not a very good line to adopt)

1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 and 3.g3/Bg2 (sadly, this line has no real force and is not a very good line to adopt)

Caro-Kann

1. e4 c6

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nh3 (Main line with 7.Nh3)

1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3.f4 (a line of the Dunst opening, 1.Nc3)

1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3.Nd2 (KIA vs. Alekhin)

French

1. e4 e6

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 (Alekhin-Chatard Attack)

1. e4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3.f4 (a line of the Dunst opening, 1.Nc3)

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3.Nd2 (KIA vs. French)

Pirc/Modern

1. e4 ...d6/...g6

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4. f4 (Austrian Attack)

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4. f4 (Austrian Attack)

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4. Nge2 and 5. g3, 6. Bg2 (King Fianchetto Variation)

Sicilian

1. e4 c5

Closed: without d4

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 and 3.Be2 (idea 4. c3) or 3. Bb5(+) (Rossolimo Variation)

1. e4 c5 2. f4 (Grand Prix Attack) or

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 with 4. Bg2, 5. d3, 6. f4 (Closed Variation)

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 and 3.g3 (KIA vs. Sicilian)

I simply haven't the courage to take on a repertoire which includes the Open Sicilian, and my experience of playing the Black side of the Sicilian is that not many White club players have either! So I'll leave those lines to you and any time you have to do your own research. I have a feeling it's something you come to study as your chess improves. Analysis and Games

 

I'll go through each approach in turn, looking at a system to play against each defence.

I'll concentrate more on the example games than the theory, and more on the 'piece attack' lines than the others, because I think that's what you should be playing.

 

A. Piece attacks against the common half-open defences

In each of these lines White has a straightforward plan of campaign:

­ rapid development

­ keep Black passive

­ keep lines open if you can

­ keep an eye out for lightning raids

 

A1. Piece attacks vs. Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6: 1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4

This is not a particularly well-regarded line for White - that is, it is not considered to be a good way to try for advantage at GM level. But it gives you game where you don't have to learn much sharp theory and you are playing the sort of game you like. It has also been responsible for some amusing miniatures:

Ourmet,J - Cierniak,P (1) Paris, 1989

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nxd5 4. Bc4 Nxc3 5. Qf3 e6 6. Qxc3 Nc6 7. Nf3 b6

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8. Bb5 1-0

and

Iskov,G - Woge Nielsen,J, it, Kobenhavn, 1989

1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. e5 d4 4. Nce2 Ne4 5. c3 c5 6. d3 1-0

 

You must be prepared, after 1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3, to play the Vienna or other opening after 2...e5.

After 2...d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4 Black has a choice of moving the knight (4...Nb6, 4...Nxc3) or finding some way to defend it (4...c6, 4...e6):

 

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Avoiding with 4...Nb6

White's next is easy to find.

5. Bb3 c5

[5... Nc6 6. Qf3 e6 7. Nge2 Be7 8. d3 O-O 9. Bf4 Na5 10. Qg3 Bd6 11. Ne4 Nxb3 12. axb3 Bxf4 13. Nxf4

r+bq-rk+
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R-+-K-+R

+= Tietze-Neumann, corr; the Knights are nicely placed]

6. Qh5 e6 7. d3 Nc6 8. Bg5 +=

[This is the best move, but an example with 8. Nf3 went 8...Be7 9. Ng5 g6 10. Qh6 Bf8 11. Qh3 Bg7 12. Nge4 Nd5 13. Bh6 e5

r+bqk+-r
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White plays a likely-looking Queen sacrifice.

14. Bxg7 Bxh3 15. Nxd5 Qa5+ 16. Kf1 O-O-O 17. Bxh8 Rxh8 18. gxh3

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Visser-Spanjaard 1948; White is better, as the Black pieces can't get going]

]

Avoiding with 4... Nxc3

White has a cunning reply to this move.

5. Qf3 e6 6. Qxc3

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6... Qg5 7. Nf3

[7. Kf1 +=]

7... Qxg2 8. Rg1 Qh3

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]

White has compensation for the sacrificed pawn.

 

Defending with 4... c6

Again, the Qf3 move is strong; Black is obliged to lock in the Bc8.

5. Qf3 Be6 6. Nge2 Nc7 7. Bxe6 Nxe6 8. d4

[8. d3 += is good enough]

8... Nxd4 9. Nxd4 Qxd4 10. Be3 Qb4 11. O-O-O e5 ?

[11... e6]

12. Qf5 f6 13. Ne4 Be7 14. Qe6

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+- Potengowski-Kerckhoff, 1930; White has a clear advantage]

Defending with 4... e6

White places his pieces as actively as possible.

5. Qf3 Nb4 ?! 6. Bb3 N8c6 7. Nge2 Be7 8. a3 Ne5 9. Qg3 Nbc6 10. d4

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+/- Bellon-Alburt 1978]

White is better placed.

 

 

Example games A1

|


Karaklajic,N - Marjanovic,Z (3) Pula, 1990 [B02]

1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4 Nb6 5. Bb3 c5 6. Qh5

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Again, White tries to get Black to play ...e6; Black resists.

6... c4 7. Bxc4 Nxc4 8. Qb5+ Nc6 9. Qxc4 Qd4 10. Qxd4 Nxd4 11. Kd1

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White is a pawn up and just needs to survive the next few moves to reach a winning endgame.

11... Bf5 12. d3 O-O-O 13. Be3 e5 14. Nge2 Bc5 15. Re1 Nxe2 16. Kxe2 Bxe3 17. Kxe3 Rhe8 18. f3 h5 19. a4 g5 20. h3 g4 21. hxg4 hxg4 22. f4 Rd4 23. fxe5 Rxe5+ 24. Kd2 1-0

 


Lendwai - Neckar,L, Nova-Park/SW,2,21, 1989 [B02]

1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4 e6 5. Nf3 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Re1 Nb6 8. Bb3 c5 9. d3 Nc6 10. a3 Nd5 11. Ne4 b6 12. Qe2 Qc7

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Neat Knights!

13. Bd2 Nf4 14. Qe3 Nd5 15. Qe2 h6 16. Ng3 Nf6 17. Bc3 Bb7 18. h4

An adventurous pawn

18...Rad8 19. Ng5 hxg5 20. hxg5 Nd5 21. g6 Nf4 22. gxf7+ Rxf7 23. Qg4 Nd4 24. Bxd4 Rxd4

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R-+-R-K-

Now an enterprising sacrifice to expose the Black King. White can regain the exchange with Bb3xe6 xf7 but hopes for more.

25. Rxe6 Nxe6 26. Qxe6 Qf4 27. Nf5 c4 28. Nxe7+ Kh7 29. Qg6+ Kh8 30. Qh5+ Qh6 31. Qxf7 Rd8 32. Bxc4 1-0

 


Madl,I - Guadalpi,D (1) Val-Thorens, 1989 [B02]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nxd5 4. Bc4 Nxc3 5. bxc3 g6 6. Qf3 e6 7. Ne2 Bg7 8. Ba3 Nc6 9. d4 Ne7 10. O-O O-O 11. Ng3 Re8 12. Rfe1 Rb8

-rbqr+k+
ppp-npbp
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B-P-+QN-
P+P+-PPP
R-+-R-K-

White has good chances for an attack.

13. Ne4 Nf5 14. Rad1 b5 15. Bd3 a5 16. Bc1 Bb7 17. Qe2 Bxe4 18. Bxe4 Qe7 19. Bxf5 gxf5 20. Rd3 b4 21. Rg3 Kh8 22. Qh5 Qf8 23. Bf4 Rb7

-+-+rq-k
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Black undoubtedly missed White's idea when considering his last few moves.

24. Rxg7 1-0

 


Weiss,M - Shields,P (5), Chicago, 1989 [B02]

1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. exd5 Nxd5 4. Bc4 e6 5. Qf3 Nxc3 6. Qxc3 Nc6 7. Nf3 Qd6 8. a3 Bd7 9. O-O O-O-O

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Black skips to the Queen's-side

10. d4 Be7 11. Be3 Bf6 12. Rad1 Ne7 13. Ne5 Be8 14. Bf4 Nf5 15. Ng6 e5

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This central break is the right sort of idea for Black, but goes very wrong here.

16. dxe5 Qxd1 17. exf6 Bc6 18. Qe5 Rd7 19. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 20. Bf1 Nd6 21. Nxh8 Bb5 22. Qxb5 Nxb5 23. fxg7 1-0

 

 

I have spent quite a while on the Alekhin's, not because it's a very common line but

­ you won't find much on the Bc4 plan in the books

­ the White plan is exactly what you should be doing in all the recommended lines below.

 

A2. Piece attacks vs. Caro-Kann Defence

All the main lines in the books continue:

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5

and now

3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4

You may find players who will try and gum the whole position up with 3...g6. tempting 4. e5. You can play 4. h3 but the resulting positions are rather dull If you don't like that idea, try instead

3. Nd2

when 3...g6 can be met by 4. c3, keeping the tension in the centre, and

3...dxe4 4. Nxe4

gives us the starting position from the books.

Black has tried 3...Nf6 e.g.


Tal-Campomanes, Leipzig Olympiad 1960 [B15]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. e6 fxe6 6. Bd3 Nf6 7. Nf3 g6 8. h4 c5 9. dxc5 Nc6 10. Qe2 Bg7 11. Bd2 Qc7 12. O-O-O e5 13. Bg5 Be6 14. Nb5 Qb8 15. h5 gxh5 16. Nfd4 Bg4 17. f3 e4 18. fxg4 Nxd4 19. Nxd4 exd3 20. Rxd3 Ne4 21. Nf5 Qe5 22. Nxg7+ Qxg7 23. Rxd5 Nxg5 24. Qb5+ Kf7 25. Rf1+ Kg6 26. Qd3+ Kh6 27. Rh1 1-0

 

 

A2.1 Solid line with 4... Nd7

White places his pieces actively in the hope of forcing ...e6 before the Bc8 escapes.

5. Bc4 Ngf6 6. Ng5 e6 7. Qe2 Nb6

[7... h6 8. Nxf7 Kxf7 9. Qxe6+ Kg6 10. Bd3+ Kh5 11. Qh3#]

8. Bd3 h6

[8... Qxd4 is too dangerous:

9. N1f3

idea Ne5,Ng5xf7

9... Bb4+ 10. c3 Bxc3+ 11. Kf1 Qc5 12. bxc3 Qxc3 13. Bb2 Qa5

r+b+k+-r
pp+-+ppp
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q-+-+-N-
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PB-+QPPP
R-+-+K+R

White has great play for the pawn]

9. N5f3 c5 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Ne5 Nbd7 12. Ngf3 O-O 13. Bd2 Nxe5 14. Nxe5 Bd4

[14... Qd5 15. O-O-O Qxa2 16. c3]

15. O-O-O Qd5 16. f4 Qxa2 17. c3 Bc5 18. g4 Nd5 19. g5 Qa1+ 20. Bb1 g6 21. gxh6 b5 22. Qd3 Ba3 23. Qc2 Bb7 24. Rhg1 Rfc8

r+r+-+k+
pb+-+p+-
-+-+p+pP
+p+nN-+-
-+-+-P-+
b-P-+-+-
-PQB-+-P
qBKR+-R-

Ripe for picking, I'd say.

25. Rxg6+ Kf8 26. h7 Ke7 27. Rg7 b4

[27... Rf8 28. Ng6+ Kf6 29. Nxf8 Kxg7 30. h8=Q+ Kxh8 31. Qh7#]

28. Rxf7+ Kd6 29. Rd7+ Kc5 30. Rxb7 1-0

Kirpichnikov-Lein, 1974]

 

A2.2. Lines with 4... Nf6

5. Nxf6+

...and Black has a choice of captures.

 

A2.2.1 Tartakower Variation, 5... exf6

This is a dull line for Black. The most straightforward attacking line against it is

6. c3 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. Ne2 Re8 9. Qc2 g6 10. h4

See example games.

 

A2.2.2 Bronstein-Larsen line, 5...gxf6

This is the more dynamic line; Black hopes to make good use of the half-open files.

6. Nf3 Bg4

[6... Bf5

is the normal-looking move, but it isn't very good here e.g.

7. Bd3 Bg6 8. O-O Qc7 9. c4 Nd7 10. d5 O-O-O 11. Be3 e5 12. Be2 Kb8

[12... c5 13. Nh4]

13. Rc1 f5 14. c5

-k-r-b-r
ppqn+p+p
-+p+-+b+
+-PPpp+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-BN+-
PP-+BPPP
+-RQ+RK-

14... cxd5 15. c6 bxc6 16. Bb5]

7. Be2 Qc7 8. h3 Bh5 9. O-O Nd7

[9... e6 is better, but White should still get a good attacking game after 10. c4 Nd7 11. d5 O-O-O]

10. d5 Rd8 11. c4 Nb6 12. Be3 Bxf3

[12... cxd5 13. cxd5 Nxd5

[13... Rxd5 14. Bxb6 Rxd1 15. Bxc7]

14. Bb5+]

13. Bxb6 axb6 14. Bxf3 cxd5 15. cxd5 Bh6 16. Qa4+ Kf8 +/- Smyslov-Pachman 1964]

 

|
A2.3 Classical Variation with 4...Bf5

Now play:

5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nh3

This is the most exciting line. The main line goes something like:

7. Nf3 Nd7 8. h5 Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 Qc7 11. Bd2 e6 12. O-O-O Ngf6 13. Qe2 O-O-O 14. Ne5

-+kr-b-r
ppqn+pp-
-+p+pn-p
+-+-N-+P
-+-P-+-+
+-+-+-N-
PPPBQPP+
+-KR+-+R

...when White has a small advantage which is difficult to make any use of.

7... Nf6 8. Nf4 Bh7 9. Bc4 e6 10. O-O Bd6

Now we see the point of the Nf4 move:

11. Nxe6 fxe6 12. Bxe6

rn-qk+-r
pp+-+-pb
-+pbBn-p
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-P
+-+-+-N-
PPP+-PP+
R-BQ+RK-

White has good chances for attack, although if the attack fails, the missing piece will lose the game.

12... Qc7 13. Re1

[13. Nh5 may be better]

13... Nbd7 14. Bg8+ Kf8 15. Bxh7 Rxh7

and Black is holding on.

 

Example games A2

Kavalek-Andersson 1978

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2

Kavalek actually played 3. Nc3

3...dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6+ exf6 6.c3 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. Ne2 Re8 9. Qc2 g6 10. h4 Nd7 11. h5 Nf8 12. Bh6 Qc7 13. O-O-O Be6

[13... b5 14. Rh4]

14. c4 Rad8 15. hxg6 fxg6 16. c5 Be7 17. Nf4 Bf7 18. Bc4

-+-rrnk+
ppq-bb+p
-+p+-ppB
+-P-+-+-
-+BP-N-+
+-+-+-+-
PPQ+-PP+
+-KR+-+R

The Bf7 must be exchanged.

18... Rd5

[18... Bxc4 19. Qxc4+ Kh8 20. Qf7 Bd6 21. Bg7#]

19. Rde1 Red8 20. Bxd5 cxd5 21. Re3 Rd7 22. Rhe1 g5

else Qe2 and Re8+

23. Bxf8 Bxf8 24. Rh1 h6 25. Ng6 Bxc5 26. Rc3 Bd6 27. Rxh6 Kg7 28. Nf8 Kxf8

[28... Bg8 29. Nxd7]

29. Rh8+ Ke7 30. Qe2+ Be6 31. Rh7+

-+-+-+-+
ppqrk-+R
-+-bbp-+
+-+p+-p-
-+-P-+-+
+-R-+-+-
PP-+QPP+
+-K-+-+-

White, who has conducted the attack with great accuracy, finds an equally crisp finish.

1-0

[31... Kf8 32. Rxc7 Bxc7 33. Qxe6 Rxh7 34. Qc8+]

[31... Kd8 32. Qxe6 Rxh7 33. Qg8+]


De Armas,A - Jensen,C (7) Novi, 1990 [B18]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h5 7. N1e2 e6 8. Nf4 Ne7 9. c3 Nd7 10. Nxg6 Nxg6 11. Nxh5 Nxh4 12. g3

r+-qkb-r
pp+n+pp-
-+p+p+-+
+-+-+-+N
-+-P-+-n
+-P-+-P-
PP-+-P-+
R-BQKB+R

The open h-file looks dangerous for both sides, but Black must retreat.

12... Ng6 13. Bd3 Rh7 14. Qc2

r+-qkb-+
pp+n+ppr
-+p+p+n+
+-+-+-+N
-+-P-+-+
+-PB+-P-
PPQ+-P-+
R-B-K-+R

Suddenly, White looks much the better.

14... f5 15. Qb3 Ne7 16. Qxe6 g6 17. Bg5 Qa5 18. O-O-O

r+-+kb-+
pp+nn-+r
-+p+Q+p+
q-+-+pBN
-+-P-+-+
+-PB+-P-
PP-+-P-+
+-KR+-+R

White is looking very good!

18... Rxh5

[18... gxh5 19. Rde1 O-O-O 20. Re5 Qa4 21. Bxf5 Rg7

-+kr-b-+
pp+nn-r-
-+p+Q+-+
+-+-RBBp
q+-P-+-+
+-P-+-P-
PP-+-P-+
+-K-+-+R

19. Bxe7 Qd5 20. Qxg6+ Kxe7 21. Rxh5

r+-+-b-+
pp+nk-+-
-+p+-+Q+
+-+q+p+R
-+-P-+-+
+-PB+-P-
PP-+-P-+
+-KR+-+-

Enough! 1-0

 


Haas,C - Trachsel, Arosa, 1990 [B18]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nh3 Nf6 8. Nf4 Bh7 9. c3 e6 10. Bc4 Nd5 11. Qg4

rn-qkb-r
pp+-+ppb
-+p+p+-p
+-+n+-+-
-+BP-NQP
+-P-+-N-
PP-+-PP+
R-B-K-+R

Black now exchanges one his two developed pieces, bringing another White piece into play.

11... Nxf4 12. Bxf4 Qf6 13. Kf1 Nd7 14. Re1 O-O-O 15. Rh3 Bf5

-+kr-b-r
pp+n+pp-
-+p+pq-p
+-+-+b+-
-+BP-BQP
+-P-+-NR
PP-+-PP+
+-+-RK+-

Winning the exchange? This was actually a cunning trap for Black to fall into.

16. Qf3 Bxh3 17. Qxc6+ 1-0

 


Rodriguez,Danie - Ruxton,K (6) WchJ, 1989 [B18]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6

Here White adopts a slightly different move order to the recommended line above.

6. N1e2 e6 7. Nf4 Bd6 8. h4

rn-qk+nr
pp+-+ppp
-+pbp+b+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-N-P
+-+-+-N-
PPP+-PP+
R-BQKB+R

Again, Black is prompted to exchange on f4.

8... Bxf4 9. Bxf4 h6 10. h5 Bh7 11. c3 Nf6 12. Qb3 Qe7 13. Be5 b6 14. O-O-O O-O 15. Bd3 Bxd3 16. Rxd3 Nbd7 17. Kb1 Ng4 18. Re1

r+-+-rk+
p-+nqpp-
-pp+p+-p
+-+-B-+P
-+-P-+n+
+QPR+-N-
PP-+-PP+
+K+-R-+-

White simply plays to dominate the d-file after the exchange on e5.

18... Ngxe5 19. dxe5 Nc5 20. Qa3 Qg5 21. Rd4 Rfd8 22. Red1 Rd5 23. b4 Nd7 24. c4 Rxd4 25. Rxd4 Qe7 26. f4 c5 27. b5 f6 28. exf6 Nxf6 29. Rd2 e5 30. fxe5 Qxe5 31. Qd3

r+-+-+k+
p-+-+-p-
-p-+-n-p
+Pp-q-+P
-+P+-+-+
+-+Q+-N-
P+-R-+P+
+K+-+-+-

Black's position is loose and he must be very careful...

31... Rf8 32. Re2 Qf4 33. Nf5 Re8

-+-+r+k+
p-+-+-p-
-p-+-n-p
+Pp-+N+P
-+P+-q-+
+-+Q+-+-
P+-+R+P+
+K+-+-+-

34. Ne7+ Kf7 35. Qg6+ Kf8

-+-+rk-+
p-+-N-p-
-p-+-nQp
+Pp-+-+P
-+P+-q-+
+-+-+-+-
P+-+R+P+
+K+-+-+-

36. Qxe8+ Kxe8 37. Nd5+ 1-0

...More careful than that, anyway

 


Schlindwein,R - Hugger,M (1) Badenweiler, 1990 [B18]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. N1e2 h6 7. Nf4 Bh7 8. Bc4 e6 9. O-O Nf6 10. Re1 Nd5

rn-qkb-r
pp+-+ppb
-+p+p+-p
+-+n+-+-
-+BP-N-+
+-+-+-N-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQR-K-

The pin on the e-file can be exploited.

11. Bxd5 cxd5 12. Qh5 Qg5

[12... g6 13. Qxd5 Nc6]

13. Rxe6+ Kd8 14. Qxf7 Nc6 15. Re8# 1-0

A3. Piece attacks vs. French 1. e4 e6: 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 (Albin-Alekhin-Chatard Attack)

Well, you won't get the Alekhin line in every game. The French starts:

1. e4 e6

Now play the natural sequence

2. d4 d5 3. Nc3

Black now has an important choice: safe or brave?

 

A3.1. Rubinstein Variation 3...dxe4 4. Nxe4

rnbqkbnr
ppp-+ppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKBNR

This is a solid line but Black lacks counterplay.

 

A3.1.1 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Nf6

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6

White can get an advantage through straightforward moves:

5. Nxf6+ gxf6

(5...Qxf6 6. Nf3 h6 7. Bd3

rnb+kb-r
ppp-+pp-
-+-+pq-p
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+B+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQK-+R

6. Nf3 b6 7. Bb5+ c6 8. Bc4 Bb7 9. Bf4 Bd6 10. Bg3 Qc7 11. Qe2 Nd7 12. O-O O-O-O 13. Ba6

-+kr-+-r
pbqn+p+p
Bppbpp-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+-+NB-
PPP+QPPP
R-+-+RK-

Liublinsky-Ufimsev 1945.

 

A3.1.2 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Bd7

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bd7

This

Stonewall

variation recently had some recommendations with the idea of getting a line for the Bishop with Bc6, but White shouldn't be short of play:

5. Nf3 Bc6 6. Bd3

rn-qkbnr
ppp-+ppp
-+b+p+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
+-+B+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQK-+R

6...Nf6

(6...Nd7 may be better)

7. Nxf6+ gxf6 8. Qe2

rn-qkb-r
ppp-+p+p
-+b+pp-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+B+N+-
PPP+QPPP
R-B-K-+R

+/- Levy.

 

A3.1.3 Rubinstein Variation with 4...Nd7

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7

The main line, which, however, promises Black little. There have been many lines explored here but as an example you could play over:

5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7. Ne5

r+bqkb-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+-N-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKB+R

White has a small advantage with easy development. Tarrasch showed us several times how to play these positions: see EG.

 

A3.2. Guimard Variation 3. ... Nc6

r+bqkbnr
ppp-+ppp
-+n+p+-+
+-+p+-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKBNR

In this line, Black cannot play the natural counterattck ...c5, and the other break with ...f6 is riskier. Now

4. e5

r+bqkbnr
ppp-+ppp
-+n+p+-+
+-+pP-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKBNR

4...Nge7 5. Nce2 Nf5 6. Nf3 b6 7. Nf4+/-

r+bqkb-r
p-p-+ppp
-pn+p+-+
+-+pPn+-
-+-P-N-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKB+R

leaves Black without scope, so Black should prefer

4...f6

when, after

5. exf6 Nxf6 6. Nf6 Bd6 7. Bg5 O-O 8. Bd3 Bd7 9. Qd2 Qe8 10. O-O-O Qh5 11.Rde1

r+-+-rk+
pppb+-pp
-+nbpn-+
+-+p+-Bq
-+-P-+-+
+-NB+N+-
PPPQ-PPP
+-K-R-+R

White has pressure along the e-file and is in any event more actively placed.

 

A3. 3. Classical Variation, 3...Nf6

This is met by:

4. Bg5

rnbqkb-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+p+-B-
-+-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

 

The natural reply here is the balancing ...Be7 but Black has two alternatives: ...Bb4 and ...dxe4.

 

A3.3.1. The Burn Variation, 4... dxe4

rnbqkb-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+-+-B-
-+-Pp+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

This has obvious links with the Rubinstein line.

5. Nxe4 Be7 6. Bxf6

And Black has tried both recaptures:

 

6...Bxf6 (Variation 1)

rnbqk+-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+pb-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

Black has the two bishops and is solid; White can claim only a small advantage.

7. Nf3 Nd7 8. Qd2 O-O 9.O-O-O b6 10. d5 Ne5 11. Qf4 Ng6 12. Nxf6+ Qxf6 13. Qxf6 gxf6

r+b+-rk+
p-p-+p+p
-p-+ppn+
+-+P+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
+-KR+B+R

...when White hopes that the greater harmony of the pawns will give the advantage.

 

6... gxf6 (Variation 2)

rnbqk+-r
ppp-bp+p
-+-+pp-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

A more risky and more dynamic try.

After 7. Nf3 Black hopes the two bishops and open d- and g-files will give active play. White should develop properly and aim for d5, breaking open the position.

 

 

|
A3.3.2. The MacCutcheon Variation, 4... Bb4

rnbqk+-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+p+-B-
-b-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

This line still offers Black some prospects of a counterattacking game, but is not as good as the Winawer.

5. e5 h6 6. Bd2 Bxc3 7. bxc3 Ne4 8. Qg4 g6 9. Bd3 Nxd2 10. Kxd2 c5 11. Qf4 Nc6 12. Nf3

r+bqk+-r
pp+-+p+-
-+n+p+pp
+-ppP-+-
-+-P-Q-+
+-PB+N+-
P+PK-PPP
R-+-+-+R

White has the idea of dxc5 and Nd4, with advantage.

A3.3.3. The Classical Variation 4... Be7 (and Alekhin Chatard attack with 6. h4)

rnbqk+-r
ppp-bppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+p+-B-
-+-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

Again White's move is easy to remember:

5. e5 Nfd7

rnbqk+-r
pppnbppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+pP-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

6. h4

This is, at last, the Alekhin-Chatard Attack. White offers a pawn for chances of attack. Just how good this line can be is shown by the following miniature:

Zuber,M - Halmkin,P (Exeter Vs Teignmouth, 1995)

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 Bxg5 7. hxg5 Qxg5 8. Nh3 Qe7 9. Qg4 g6 10. Bd3 b6 11. Nf4 Ba6 12. Bxg6 fxg6 13. Nxe6 Nf8 14. Nxd5 Nxe6 15. Nxe7 1-0

Good, isn't it?

Black has various ways of declining the gambit, but none are very promising (analysis from BCO2 and elsewhere):

 

Declining with 6... f6

7. Qh5+ Kf8

[or 7... g6 8. exf6 gxh5 9. fxe7 Qxe7 10. Bxe7 Kxe7

rnb+-+-r
pppnk-+p
-+-+p+-+
+-+p+-+p
-+-P-+-P
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
R-+-KBNR

 

Declining with 6... c5

7. Bxe7 Qxe7 8. Nb5 +=

 

Declining with 6... h6

7. Be3 c5 8. Qg4 g6 9. Nf3 +=

Hellers-Barayev 1986

 

Declining with 6... a6

7. Qg4 Bxg5 8. hxg5 c5 9. g6 f5 10. Qg3 h6 11. Nf3 O-O 12. O-O-O Nc6 13. Ne2

r+bq-rk+
+p+n+-p-
p+n+p+Pp
+-ppPp+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+-+NQ-
PPP+NPP+
+-KR+B+R

+=/unclear BCO2

 

Declining with 6... O-O

7. Qg4 f5 8. exf6 Nxf6 9. Qg3 c5 10. dxc5 Nbd7 11. O-O-O Nxc5 12. Bd3 b5

r+bq-rk+
p-+-b-pp
-+-+pn-+
+pnp+-B-
-+-+-+-P
+-NB+-Q-
PPP+-PP+
+-KR+-NR

unclear: Kupreichik-Moskalenko 1986

 

The Gambit accepted: 6...Bxg5

7. hxg5 Qxg5 8. Nh3 Qe7 9. Nf4 Nc6

rnb+k+-r
pppnqppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+pP-+-
-+-P-N-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
R-+QKB+R

The N goes to h3 instead of f3 to allow Q to move to g4 when White has good prospects of attack.

Black has a couple of alternatives to 9...Nc6:

[9... f5 10. Qh5+ Qf7 11. Nxe6 g6 12. Nxc7+ Kd8 13. Qf3

rnbk-+-r
ppNn+q+p
-+-+-+p+
+-+pPp+-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-+Q+-
PPP+-PP+
R-+-KB+R

+- BCO2

13... Kxc7 14. Nxd5+ Kd8 15. Bc4]

[9... Nf8 10. Qg4 f5 11. exf6 gxf6 12. O-O-O: see example games]

[9... a6 10. Qg4 Kf8 11. Qf3 Kg8 12. Bd3 c5

[12... h6]

13. Bxh7+

rnb+-+kr
+p+nqppB
p+-+p+-+
+-ppP-+-
-+-P-N-+
+-N-+Q+-
PPP+-PP+
R-+-K-+R

Keres-Wade 1954]

10. Qg4 Nxd4 11. O-O-O Nf5 12. Nfxd5

r+b+k+-r
pppnqppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+NPn+-
-+-+-+Q+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
+-KR+B+R

With compensation, according to BCO2

 

A3.4. The Winawer variation, 3... Bb4 and Alekhin Gambit 4. Nge2

rnbqk+nr
ppp-+ppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+p+-+-
-b-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKBNR

Black takes a risky decision - to attack White's Knight but with the important dark-squared bishop. White has the main try 4. e5 but also some ways of avoiding these critical lines, including the gambit lines 4. Nge2 and 4. a3, and the Winawer Exchange 4. exd5.

4. Nge2

Another Alekhin Gambit

rnbqk+nr
ppp-+ppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+p+-+-
-b-PP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+NPPP
R-BQKB+R

Black is advised not to hang on to the pawn, but to concentrate on good development instead.

4... dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nf6

rnbqk+-r
ppp-bppp
-+-+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
P-+-+-+-
-PP+NPPP
R-BQKB+R

An open game with about equal chances has resulted.

 

 

Example games A3

A3.3.3 Examples of the Alekhin-Chatard Attack

|
Alekhin - Fahrni, Mannheim, 1914

This is an early game that showed us all the way.

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 Bxg5 7. hxg5 Qxg5 8. Nh3

rnb+k+-r
pppn+ppp
-+-+p+-+
+-+pP-q-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-+-+N
PPP+-PP+
R-+QKB+R

The key move in the Gambit Accepted.

8... Qe7 9. Nf4 Nf8 10. Qg4 f5 11. exf6 gxf6 12. O-O-O c6 13. Re1 Kd8

[13... Na6 14. Bxa6 bxa6 15. Nfxd5 cxd5 16. Nxd5 Qf7 17. Qf4]

14. Rh6 e5 15. Qh4 Nbd7 16. Bd3 e4 17. Qg3 Qf7

r+bk-n-r
pp+n+q+p
-+p+-p-R
+-+p+-+-
-+-PpN-+
+-NB+-Q-
PPP+-PP+
+-K-R-+-

18. Bxe4 dxe4 19. Nxe4 Rg8 20. Qa3!

Great idea.

20... Qg7 21. Nd6 Nb6 22. Ne8 Qf7 23. Qd6+ Qd7 24. Qxf6+

r+bkNnr+
pp+q+-+p
-np+-Q-R
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-N-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
+-K-R-+-

1-0

 


Cid,M - Araya,R (4) Copa, 1989[C13]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 a6

Declined

7. Qg4 Bxg5 8. hxg5 c5 9. g6 f5 10. Qf4 h6 11. Nf3 O-O 12. dxc5 Qe8 13. O-O-O

rnb+qrk+
+p+n+-p-
p+-+p+Pp
+-PpPp+-
-+-+-Q-+
+-N-+N+-
PPP+-PP+
+-KR+B+R

The g-pawn is tempting...

13... Qxg6 14. Nxd5

A characteristic sac.

14...exd5 15. Rxd5 Qg4 16. Qd2 f4 17. Rh4 Qe6 18. Bc4 Kh8 19. Rxf4 Rxf4 20. Qxf4 Qe7 21. Nh4 Qe8 22. Rd6

rnb+q+-k
+p+n+-p-
p+-R-+-p
+-P-P-+-
-+B+-Q-N
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
+-K-+-+-

Black's useless Q-side pieces are all still in bed.

1-0

 


Djurhuus,R - Minero,S (7) Santiago, 1990[C13]

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 e6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 a6

Declined

7. Qg4 Kf8 8. Qf4 c5 9. dxc5 Nc6 10. Nf3 Nxc5 11. O-O-O b5 12. Rh3

r+bq-k-r
+-+-bppp
p+n+p+-+
+pnpP-B-
-+-+-Q-P
+-N-+N+R
PPP+-PP+
+-KR+B+-

The position is still not easy for Black

12... Bd7 13. Kb1 b4 14. Ne2 Ne4 15. Bxe7+ Qxe7 16. Ng5 Nc5 17. h5 h6 18. Nf3 Ne4 19. Qe3 a5 20. Ng3 Nc5 21. Nd4 a4 22. f4 b3 23. cxb3 Nxd4 24. Rxd4 axb3 25. a3 Rb8 26. Rb4 Rc8 27. Ne2 Ba4 28. Qd4 Bd7 29. Nc1 g6 30. hxg6 fxg6 31. Nxb3 Kg7 32. Nxc5 Rxc5 33. Rg3 Rhc8

-+r+-+-+
+-+bq-k-
-+-+p+pp
+-rpP-+-
-R-Q-P-+
P-+-+-R-
-P-+-+P+
+K+-+B+-

At last the K-side attack comes!

34. f5 Rc1+ 35. Ka2 Rxf1 36. f6+ Rxf6 37. exf6+ Qxf6

And White won with the exhange and extra pawns.

38. Qa7 Rd8 39. Rb7 Qe7 40. Rc3 Kf8 41. Qb6 Kf7 42. Qe3 Qg5 43. Qd4 h5 44. Rf3+ Kg8 45. a4 Qe7 46. Qe5 Qg7 47. Rf6 Ra8 48. b3 Re8 49. Qg5 Kh7

-+-+r+-+
+R+b+-qk
-+-+pRp+
+-+p+-Qp
P+-+-+-+
+P+-+-+-
K+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+-

50. Rxd7 1-0

 


Sokolov - Shemiakin, T, Simferopol, 1989[C13]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 O-O

Declined

7. Bd3 f5 8. exf6 Nxf6 9. Nf3 c5 10. dxc5 Nc6 11. Qe2 Qa5 12. O-O-O

r+b+-rk+
pp+-b-pp
-+n+pn-+
q-Pp+-B-
-+-+-+-P
+-NB+N+-
PPP+QPP+
+-KR+-+R

Black now becomes provocative

12... d4 13. Bxf6 gxf6 14. Nxd4 Nxd4

r+b+-rk+
pp+-b-+p
-+-+pp-+
q-P-+-+-
-+-n-+-P
+-NB+-+-
PPP+QPP+
+-KR+-+R

The crowd were baying for...

15. Bxh7+ Kxh7 16. Qh5+ Kg7 17. Rxd4 f5 18. Rh3 Bxc5 19. Rg3+ Kf6 20. Ne4+

r+b+-r-+
pp+-+-+-
-+-+pk-+
q-b-+p+Q
-+-RN+-P
+-+-+-R-
PPP+-PP+
+-K-+-+-

The lonely King wanders to his grave

20... Ke5

[20... fxe4 21. Rg6+ Kf7 22. Rh6+ Ke7 23. Rh7+ Rf7 24. Qxf7#]

21. f4+ Kxd4 22. Qd1+ Qd2+ 23. Nxd2 Kd5 24. Nb3+ Kc6 25. Nxc5 Kxc5 1-0

 


Zeh,H - Bahry,J, Baden-Baden, 1989[C13]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. e4 d5 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e5 Nfd7 6. h4 a6 7. Qg4 h5

Declined again

8. Qg3 g6 9. Nf3 c5 10. dxc5 Nc6 11. O-O-O

r+bqk+-r
+p+nbp+-
p+n+p+p+
+-PpP-Bp
-+-+-+-P
+-N-+NQ-
PPP+-PP+
+-KR+B+R

11... Bxg5+ 12. Nxg5 Qe7 13. f4 Nxc5 14. Be2 Bd7 15. Qf2 O-O-O

Black escapes to the Q-side

16. g3 Rdf8

-+k+-r-r
+p+bqp+-
p+n+p+p+
+-npP-Np
-+-+-P-P
+-N-+-P-
PPP+BQ-+
+-KR+-+R

17. Rxd5 exd5 18. Nxd5

the sacrifice is not so great, after all!

18... Nd3+ 19. Bxd3 Qd8 20. Ne4 Kb8 21. Nd6 Qa5 22. Nc3 Be6 23. a3

-k-+-r-r
+p+-+p+-
p+nNb+p+
q-+-P-+p
-+-+-P-P
P-NB+-P-
-PP+-Q-+
+-K-+-+R

23... Nxe5

[I think this is unnecessary, but it's hard to give Black good advice e.g. 23... Rd8 24. Rd1 f6 25. Nce4 fxe5 26. Nxb7!? Kxb7 27. Nc5+ Kb8 28. Nxe6 Rd6 29. Bc4]

24. fxe5 Qxe5 25. Qb6 Bc8 26. Bxa6 1-0

 

Now, a few games in the other Alekhin gambit.

A3.4 Examples of the Alekhin Gambit in the Winawer Variation

Miles - Reefschlager, Porz, 1982

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nc6 7.

Bb5 Nge7 8. Be3 O-O 9. Qd2 a6 10. Bxc6 Nxc6 11. O-O-O f5 12. Bg5 Qe8

13. f3 exf3 14. gxf3

r+b+qrk+
+pp-+-pp
p+n+p+-+
+-+-+pB-
-+-P-+-+
P-N-+P+-
-PPQ-+-P
+-KR+-+R

14... Nd8

[14... e5 return the pawn to activate the Bc8]

15. Rhg1 c6 16. Rg3 Rf7 17. Rdg1 b5

to allow ...Ra7, but a move too late

18. Bf6

r+bnq+k+
+-+-+rpp
p+p+pB-+
+p+-+p+-
-+-P-+-+
P-N-+PR-
-PPQ-+-P
+-K-+-R-

1-0 18... Rxf6

[18... Raa7 19. Qh6 Qf8 20. Be5 Kh8 21. Rh3 Qg8 22. Ne2 f4 23. Rxg7 Rxg7 24. Nxf4 -+bn-+qk
r-+-+-rp
p+p+p+-Q
+p+-B-+-
-+-P-N-+
P-+-+P+R
-PP+-+-P
+-K-+-+-

]

19. Rxg7+ Kh8 20. Qg5 Rg6

[20... Rf8 21. Rxh7+]

21. Rxg6 hxg6 22. Qh6+

1-0

 


Conejero,J. M - Perez Torres,J [C15], Valencia

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 f5

Yeuch.

7. Bf4 Nf6 8. f3

The best approach.

8...exf3 9. Qxf3 O-O 10. O-O-O Nd5 11. Be5 Rf7 12. Bc4

rnbq-+k+
ppp-+rpp
-+-+p+-+
+-+nBp+-
-+BP-+-+
P-N-+Q+-
-PP+-+PP
+-KR+-+R

12... Qg5+ 13. Kb1 Ne3 14. Bf4

1-0

 


Ristic,Nen - Sanchis, A [C15], Chartres

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nc6 7. Bf4 Nf6 8. Qd3 b6 9. O-O-O Bb7 10. N2c3 O-O 11. Kb1 Qd7 12. Nxf6+ Bxf6

r+-+-rk+
pbpq+ppp
-pn+pb-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-B-+
P-NQ+-+-
-PP+-PPP
+K+R+B+R

13. d5

Always, this is the key break.

13...Ne5 14. Qg3 Ng6 15. Bb5 Qc8 16. Bxc7 Bxc3 17. dxe6 Bxg2

The position is opened up nicely.

18. Rhg1 Bf6 19. exf7+ Rxf7 20. Bc4 Bb7 21. Rge1 Qf5 22. Qb3 Bg5 23. Be6 Qf3 24. Rd3 Qf6 25. Rd7 Ne7 26. Be5 Qxf2 27. Bg3 Qf3 28. Bxf7+

r+-+-+k+
pb+RnBpp
-p-+-+-+
+-+-+-b-
-+-+-+-+
PQ+-+qB-
-PP+-+-P
+K+-R-+-

1-0

 


Westerinen,H - Bergsson,S [C15], Gausdal

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nc6 7. Bf4 Nf6 8. Bb5

r+bqk+-r
ppp-+ppp
-+n+pn-+
+B+-+-+-
-+-PpB-+
P-N-+-+-
-PP+-PPP
R-+QK-+R

Black now prompts a move White might make voluntarily.

8... a6 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. Bg5 h6 11. Bxf6 Qxf6 12. Nxe4

r+b+k+-r
+-p-+pp-
p+p+pq-p
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-+
P-+-+-+-
-PP+-PPP
R-+QK-+R

Black's pawns look awful.

12... Qh4 13. Qd3 e5 14. dxe5 Qf4 15. O-O Qxe5 16. f4 Qxb2

Careless.

17. Rfb1

r+b+k+-r
+-p-+pp-
p+p+-+-p
+-+-+-+-
-+-+NP-+
P-+Q+-+-
-qP+-+PP
RR+-+-K-

1-0

 


Abdulla,M - Khechen,N [C15], Novi

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. Nxc3 Nc6 7. Bb5 Nge7 8. Bg5 f6

Ill-advised.

9. Be3 a6 10. Bxc6+ Nxc6

r+bqk+-r
+pp-+-pp
p+n+pp-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-Pp+-+
P-N-B-+-
-PP+-PPP
R-+QK-+R

11. Qh5+ g6 12. Qh6 Qe7 13. Nxe4 Bd7 14. Qh4 Rf8 15. O-O-O O-O-O 16. Rhe1 Be8

-+krbr-+
+pp-q-+p
p+n+ppp+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PN+-Q
P-+-B-+-
-PP+-PPP
+-KRR-+-

Again, the position needs opening up with d5.

17. d5 Rxd5 18. Rxd5 exd5 19. Bc5

winning the exchange

19... Qf7 20. Bxf8 dxe4 21. Qxe4 Bd7 22. Bc5 Qa2

-+k+-+-+
+ppb+-+p
p+n+-pp+
+-B-+-+-
-+-+Q+-+
P-+-+-+-
qPP+-PPP
+-K-R-+-

a hopeful lunge

23. Bd4 Nxd4 24. Qxd4 Qa1+ 25. Kd2 Qa2 26. Re7 Bc6 27. c4 b6 28. Rxh7 Bxg2

-+k+-+-+
+-p-+-+R
pp-+-pp+
+-+-+-+-
-+PQ-+-+
P-+-+-+-
qP-K-PbP
+-+-+-+-

1-0

 

|


Castillo,O - Segovia,J [C15], WchJ

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nc6 7. Qd3 Nf6 8. Nxf6+ Bxf6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O-O

r+bq-rk+
ppp-+ppp
-+n+pb-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
P-+QB-+-
-PP+NPPP
+-KR+B+R

Black now tries a break. Because White is not much better developed, he keeps it closed. We than have an opposite-side castling situation, where both sides must attack quickly.

10... e5 11. d5 Ne7 12. Ng3 Ng6 13. Qe4 Bg5 14. Nf5 Bxe3+ 15. fxe3 Ne7 16. g4

r+bq-rk+
ppp-nppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+PpN+-
-+-+Q+P+
P-+-P-+-
-PP+-+-P
+-KR+B+R

You can make this sort of move if your king is on the other side.

16... Bxf5 17. gxf5 f6 18. Rg1 Kh8 19. Rg3 Qd7 20. Bd3 Rad8 21. Rdg1 Rg8 22. Qh4 h6

-+-r-+rk
pppqn-p-
-+-+-p-p
+-+PpP+-
-+-+-+-Q
P-+BP-R-
-PP+-+-P
+-K-+-R-

Black's attack hasn't even started.

23. Rxg7 Nxf5 24. Rxg8+ Rxg8 25. Qxf6+ 1-0

 


De Eccher,S - Schneiders,A [C15], Lugano

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nge2 dxe4 5. a3 Be7 6. Nxe4 Nf6 7. Qd3 b6 8. Bf4 Bb7 9. Nxf6+ Bxf6 10. O-O-O

rn-qk+-r
pbp-+ppp
-p-+pb-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-B-+
P-+Q+-+-
-PP+NPPP
+-KR+B+R

Black is fairly well placed, though behind in development, but now blunders.

10... Bg5 11. Qb5+ 1-0

 

A3. Example of other French variations


Tarrasch - Mieses[C30], Berlin Match (3) , 1916

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Bd3 Be7 7. O-O Nxe4 8. Bxe4 Nf6 9. Bd3 b6

r+bqk+-r
p-p-bppp
-p-+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-+B+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQ+RK-

Black has conceded a small space advantage and plays his last move to get the blocked Bc8 out. Tarrasch prevents even that.

10. Ne5 O-O

Else Bb5+

11. Nc6 Qd6 12. Qf3 Bd7 13. Nxe7+ Qxe7 14. Bg5 Rac8 15. Rfe1 Rfe8

Black knows enough not to move his King's-side pawn unless he is forced to. So Tarrasch forces him to!

16. Qh3

-+r+r+k+
p-pbqppp
-p-+pn-+
+-+-+-B-
-+-P-+-+
+-+B+-+Q
PPP+-PPP
R-+-R-K-

Threatening 17. Bxf6 and 18. Qxh7

16... Qd6 17. Bxf6 gxf6 18. Qh6 f5

In just a few moves, Tarrasch has got into the heart of the King's defences.

19. Re3 Qxd4 20. c3!

A pretty final move: Black resigns, unable to stop Rg3. -+r+r+k+
p-pb+p+p
-p-+p+-Q
+-+-+p+-
-+-q-+-+
+-PBR-+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+-+-K-

 

Chess Quotes

"A draw can be obtained normally by repeating three moves, but also by one bad move."

"The winner of the game is the player who makes the next-to-last mistake"

— TARTAKOVER