Playing White against odd Black defences after 1.e4 (3)

Table of Contents 
      1. Kaulfuss,H - Diaz,Joa.C (4) Hessen-ch, 1989[B02]
      2. Short - Donner, Amsterdam, 1982 [B07]
      3. Karlsson - George, Torbay, 1994[B40]
      4. Van Geet - Guyt [A00] Paramaribo, 1967
      5. Suba,M - Bellon, Bucharest, 1978[A00]
      6. Ratsch - Schwarz, DDR tt, 1969 [A00]
      7. Schlenker,Rainer - Zimmermann,G, Heidelberg, 1985[A00]
      8. Staples,M - Lee,G, England, 1976[A00]
      9. Van Geet,Dick - Lee, Wijk aan Zee III, 1979[A00]
      10. Tong,Y - Webster,A [B08], Ch World Cadet's ( under 18 ), Singapore
      11. Bousum,J - Forbis,R [B08], It (open), Chicago
      12. Goring - NN, Berlin, 1890[B00]
      13. Schlenker,Rainer - Fuchs,D, Germany, 1985 [B00]
  1. f5
  2. Nc6
  3. Bd3
  4. Giuoco Piano
  5. King's Gambit
  6. Bishop's Opening
  7. Vienna Opening
  8. Queen's Pawn Counter-Gambit
  9. Elephant Gambit
  10. d5
  11. Damiano Defence
  12. f6
  13. Qxe4
  14. d5
  15. Philidor's Defence
  16. dxe5
  17. dxe5
  18. Nxe5
      1. Karaklajic,N - Marjanovic,Z (3) Pula, 1990 [B02]
      2. Lendwai - Neckar,L, Nova-Park/SW,2,21, 1989 [B02]
      3. Madl,I - Guadalpi,D (1) Val-Thorens, 1989 [B02]
      4. Weiss,M - Shields,P (5), Chicago, 1989 [B02]
      5. De Armas,A - Jensen,C (7) Novi, 1990 [B18]
      6. Haas,C - Trachsel, Arosa, 1990 [B18]
      7. Rodriguez,Danie - Ruxton,K (6) WchJ, 1989 [B18]
      8. Schlindwein,R - Hugger,M (1) Badenweiler, 1990 [B18]
      9. Cid,M - Araya,R (4) Copa, 1989[C13]
      10. Djurhuus,R - Minero,S (7) Santiago, 1990[C13]
      11. Sokolov - Shemiakin, T, Simferopol, 1989[C13]
      12. Zeh,H - Bahry,J, Baden-Baden, 1989[C13]
      13. Conejero,J. M - Perez Torres,J [C15], Valencia
      14. Ristic,Nen - Sanchis, A [C15], Chartres
      15. Westerinen,H - Bergsson,S [C15], Gausdal
      16. Abdulla,M - Khechen,N [C15], Novi
      17. Castillo,O - Segovia,J [C15], WchJ
      18. De Eccher,S - Schneiders,A [C15], Lugano
      19. Tarrasch - Mieses[C30], Berlin Match (3) , 1916
      20. Hort,V - Rota [B07], Aachen/SW,16,18
      21. Christ,R - Kljako,D [B07], it, Biel
      22. Knippel,M - Stratmann,B [B08], NRW
      23. Adams,M - Wolff,P [B07], London
      24. Lane,G - Saucey,M [B07], Royan
      25. Chacon,E - Blazquez,J. L [B07], Alicante
      26. Georgiev,Kr - Feher,G [B30], Cappelle
      27. Smirin,I - Nun,Ji [B30], Polanica
      28. Bogumil - Sarosi [B30], Budapest
      29. Lazarevic,M - Maric,D (6) Pula, 1990[B02]
      30. Van der Vaeren - Savva, Haifa, 1989[A00]
      31. Hill,S - Wright,A , ch-AUS/SW,5,18, 1989[B21]
      32. Campora,D. H - Shirazi,A , Ch New York ( open ), 1989[B21]
      33. Ekebjaerg,Ove (2580) - Van Manen,Gerben (2580) cr Blass-mem, 1990[B07]
      34. Bareev - Norwood, Marseilles, 1990[B09]
      35. Hodgson - Ady, Streatham Vs Ymca, London, 1981[B23]
      36. Hebden - Large, British Ch'p, 1982[B21]
      37. Plaskett - Howell, British Ch'p, 1983[B21]
      38. Hodgson - Nunn, Aaronson Open, 1978[B23]
      39. Smyslov - Romanishin, Moscow, 1976 [B23]
      40. Kaulfuss,H - Diaz,Joa.C (4) Hessen-ch, 1989[B02]
      41. Short - Donner, Amsterdam, 1982 [B07]
      42. Karlsson - George, Torbay, 1994[B40]
      43. Van Geet - Guyt [A00] Paramaribo, 1967
      44. Suba,M - Bellon, Bucharest, 1978[A00]
      45. Ratsch - Schwarz, DDR tt, 1969 [A00]
      46. Schlenker,Rainer - Zimmermann,G, Heidelberg, 1985[A00]
      47. Staples,M - Lee,G, England, 1976[A00]
      48. Van Geet,Dick - Lee, Wijk aan Zee III, 1979[A00]
      49. Tong,Y - Webster,A [B08], Ch World Cadet's ( under 18 ), Singapore
      50. Bousum,J - Forbis,R [B08], It (open), Chicago
      51. Goring - NN, Berlin, 1890[B00]
      52. Schlenker,Rainer - Fuchs,D, Germany, 1985 [B00]


C. King's Indian Attack against the common half-open defences

Introduction to the King's Indian Attack

"Club players and home enthusiasts often ask me to recommend an openings system for White which is safe, yet aggressive and does not require a superb memory and months of intense learning. In such cases I invariably recommend the King's Indian Attack" - Keene

 

-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPP+-PBP
RNBQ+RK-

The joy of the KIA is flexibility:

-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPP+-PBP
R-BQRNK-

-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-P-+-
-+-+-B-P
+-+P+NP-
PPP+-PB+
R-+QRNK-

Looking to expand on the King's-side

Example follow-up

-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
P+N+P+-+
+-PP+NP-
-P-+-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPN+P+-+
+-PPB-P-
-+QN-PBP
R-+-+RK-

Looking to expand on Queen's-side or in the centre

Example follow-up

 

To understand the KIA it is important to understand the standard King's Indian Defence ideas, which you will play as White. Here is an early King's Indian Defence game, which alerted the chess world to a new way of handling the Black pieces.

Belavanets - Bronstein 13th USSR semi-final, 1941

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 e5 4. Nf3 Nbd7 5. g3 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7. O-O O-O 8. b3 Re8 9. e3 c6 10. Qc2 Qa5 11. a4 Nf8 12. Ba3 Bf5 13. Qb2 Rad8 14. Rfd1 e4 15. Nd2 Ne6

-+-rr+k+
pp+-+pbp
-+ppnnp+
q-+-+b+-
P+PPp+-+
BPN-P-P-
-Q-N-PBP
R-+R+-K-

The Qa5 is not typical, but we can see several themes here:

­ fianchetto of the King's bishop

­ use of the e-pawn to gain an initiative on the K-side

­ over-protection of the advanced e4-pawn

­ move all the pieces to the K-side in a committal attack

 

16. b4 Qc7 17. Rdb1 Qd7 18. c5 Ng5

More over-protection

19. cxd6 Bh3 20. Bh1 Qf5 21. Ne2 Nd5 22. b5 Bg4

-+-rr+k+
pp+-+pbp
-+pP-+p+
+P+n+qn-
P+-Pp+b+
B-+-P-P-
-Q-NNP-P
RR+-+-KB

23. Kf1

Two sword-swipes with the Knights decide the game.

23...Nxe3+ 24. Ke1 Nf3+ 0-1

Now, wouldn't that all be better with an extra move? Let's see now...

Petrosian - Pachman, Bled, 1961

1. Nf3 c5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Bg2 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. d3 e6 6. e4 Nge7 7. Re1 O-O 8. e5 d6 9. exd6 Qxd6

r+b+-rk+
pp+-npbp
-+nqp+p+
+-p-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPP+-PBP
RNBQR-K-

Black seems to have good chances

10. Nbd2 Qc7 11. Nb3 Nd4 12. Bf4 Qb6 13. Ne5 Nxb3

r+b+-rk+
pp+-npbp
-q-+p+p+
+-p-N-+-
-+-+-B-+
+n+P+-P-
PPP+-PBP
R-+QR-K-

Now a very cute intermezzo

14. Nc4 Qb5 15. axb3 a5 16. Bd6 Bf6 17. Qf3 Kg7 18. Re4

[18. Qxf6+ Kxf6 19. Be5+ Kf5 20. Bg7 is already decisive]

18... Rd8

[18... Ng8 19. Bxf8+]

r+br-+-+
+p+-npkp
-+-Bpbp+
pqp-+-+-
-+N+R+-+
+P+P+QP-
-PP+-PBP
R-+-+-K-

Now the blow that made this game famous - not so much for the first move:

19. Qxf6+ Kxf6 20. Be5+ Kg5 21.Bg7 1-0

..but this last one - quiet but deadly.

21... Nf5 22. f4+ Kg4 23. Ne5+ Kh5 24. Bf3# mates

or even easier:

21... e5 22. h4+ Kf5

[22... Kh5 23. Bf3+ Bg4 24. Bxg4#] |3. Bh3|

 

If you'v e got the idea, we can look at some concrete variations.

 

C1. KIA vs. Alekhin 1. e4 Nf6: 1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 and 3. g3/Bg2

Sadly, this line has no real force and is not a good line to adopt. Black can transpose into other openings but can also just go 2...e5.

 

Example games C1

|


Kaulfuss,H - Diaz,Joa.C (4) Hessen-ch, 1989[B02]

1. e4 Nf6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 dxe4 4. dxe4 e5 5. Ngf3 Bc5 6. Bc4 Bg4

rn-qk+-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-+-n-+
+-b-p-+-
-+B+P+b+
+-+-+N+-
PPPN-PPP
R-BQK-+R

Black overlooks a little combination.

7. Bxf7+ Ke7 8. Bb3 Nc6 9. c3 Qe8 10. Qe2 Qh5 11. O-O Rhf8

r+-+-r-+
ppp-k-pp
-+n+-n-+
+-b-p-+q
-+-+P+b+
+BP-+N+-
PP-NQPPP
R-B-+RK-

Black has some compensation for the pawn.

12. h3 Bd7 13. Bd1 Bb6 14. Nc4 h6

But White's next shatters any hopes

15. Nfxe5 Nxe5 16. Qxh5 Nxh5 17. Nxb6 axb6 18. Bxh5 Bb5 19. Rd1 Bc4 20. f4 1-0

 

Fischer,Robert J - Fauber,Richard Milwaukee Northwestern, 1957

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. d3 d6 6. e4 e5

This could have arisen from an Alekhin Defence

7. Nbd2 Nbd7 8. a4 Re8 9. Nc4 h6 10. Ne1 Nf8

r+bqrnk+
ppp-+pb-
-+-p-npp
+-+-p-+-
P+N+P+-+
+-+P+-P-
-PP+-PBP
R-BQNRK-

Now the characteristic King's Indian attack starts:

11. f4 d5 12. fxe5 dxc4 13. exf6 Bxf6 14. Bxh6 Bxb2 15. Rb1 Bg7 16. Bxg7 Kxg7

r+bqrn-+
ppp-+pk-
-+-+-+p+
+-+-+-+-
P+p+P+-+
+-+P+-P-
-+P+-+BP
+R+QNRK-

Of course, dxc4 is an awful move.

17. Qf3 Qe7 18. d4 Ne6 19. Qc3 Ng5 20. Qxc4 Bh3 21. Rxb7 Bxg2 22. Nxg2 Qxe4 23. Rxc7 Qe2 24. Qxe2 Rxe2

r+-+-+-+
p-R-+pk-
-+-+-+p+
+-+-+-n-
P+-P-+-+
+-+-+-P-
-+P+r+NP
+-+-+RK-

The exchanges have left White's pieces dominant

25. h4 Nh3+ 26. Kh2 Nf2 27. Nf4 Rd2 28. Kg1 Ng4 29. Ne6+ Kh8 30. Rfxf7

1-0

 

 

C2. KIA vs. Caro-Kann 1. e4 c6: 1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2

rnbqkbnr
pp+-pppp
-+p+-+-+
+-+p+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+-+-
PPPN-PPP
R-BQKBNR

Black has an unusual amount of choice here, because of the non-forcing nature of White's opening. Black has tried:

C2.1. Caro-Kann with 3... dxe4

4. dxe4 e5 5. Ngf3 Bc5

Now for a long while Whites have been playing

6. Bc4

[But what about 6. Nxe5 Bxf2+ 7. Kxf2 Qd4+ 8. Ke1 Qxe5 9. Nc4 Qxe4+ 10. Be2 Qe6

[10... Qxg2 11. Nd6+ Kf8 12. Rf1 Be6 13. Nxf7 Bxf7 14. Qd8#]

11. Nd6+ Ke7 12. Nxc8+ Qxc8 13. Qd4

rnq+-+nr
pp+-kppp
-+p+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-Q-+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+B+PP
R-B-K-+R

with a great position for White +-]

After the normal 6. Bc4:

6... Nf6 7. O-O Qc7 8. a4

rnb+k+-r
ppq-+ppp
-+p+-n-+
+-b-p-+-
P+B+P+-+
+-+-+N+-
-PPN-PPP
R-BQ+RK-

and c3 with a quiet game

 

C2.2. Caro-Kann with 3... Nd7

Now logical is

4. Ngf3

[4. f4 is worth considering]

4... Qc7 5. g3 dxe4 6. dxe4 e5 7. Bg2 Bc5

[7... Ngf6 8. O-O g6 9. b3]

8. O-O Ne7

[8... Ngf6 9. Nh4 g6 10. Nb3]

9. b3 Ng6 10. Bb2 O-O 11. a3 a5 12. Ne1 b6 13. Nd3 Ba6 14. Nf3 Bd6 15. h4

r+-+-rk+
+-qn+ppp
bppb-+n+
p-+-p-+-
-+-+P+-P
PP+N+NP-
-BP+-PB+
R-+Q+RK-

with initiative, Olafsson-Eliskases 1960

C2.3. Caro-Kann with 3... Nf6

Straightforward development

4. Ngf3 Bg4 5. h3 Bxf3

[5... Bh5 6. g4 Bg6 7. Ne5 Nbd7 8. Nxd7 Nxd7 9. f4 e6 10. Qe2 Qh4+ 11. Qf2 Qxf2+ 12. Kxf2 Bc5+ 13. Kg3

r+-+k+-r
pp+n+ppp
-+p+p+b+
+-bp+-+-
-+-+PPP+
+-+P+-KP
PPPN-+-+
R-B-+B+R

when White's game is easier, Gufeld-Birbrager 1963]

6. Qxf3 e6 7. g3 Na6 8. Bg2 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Qe2 Nc7

r+-q-rk+
ppn-bppp
-+p+pn-+
+-+p+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+-PP
PPPNQPB+
R-B-+RK-

and now

11. f4 (Evans) puts White on top.

 

C2.4. Caro-Kann with 3... e5

This is the most aggressive, but also the most committal. It has been viewed with suspicion since the following:

4. Ngf3 Bd6 5. g3 Ne7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O f5 8. c4!

rnbq-rk+
pp+-n-pp
-+pb-+-+
+-+ppp+-
-+P+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
PP-N-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

The Black centre suddenly looks hollow.

8... dxe4 9. dxe4 Na6 10. a3 f4 11. b4 c5 12. b5 Nc7 13. Bb2

r+bq-rk+
ppn-n-pp
-+-b-+-+
+Pp-p-+-
-+P+Pp-+
P-+-+NP-
-B-N-PBP
R-+Q+RK-

 

C2.5. Caro-Kann with 3...g6

This has the best reputation.

4. g3 Bg7 5. Bg2 e5 6. Ngf3 Ne7 7. O-O O-O

Now White has tried all sorts of moves here, including:

[8. Re1] [8. b4] [8. a4] [8. b3] [8. Qe2]

Try the natural:

8. c3

8... Nd7 9. Qc2 h6 10. a4

r+bq-rk+
pp+nnpb-
-+p+-+pp
+-+pp-+-
P+-+P+-+
+-PP+NP-
-PQN-PBP
R-B-+RK-

With a normal slight White advantage,

10... a5 11. b3 b6 12. Ba3 Ba6 13. Rfe1 Re8 14. Rad1

Threat d4

14...c5 15. exd5 Nxd5 16. Nc4 Nxc3!?

17. Qxc3 e4 18. d4 exf3

r+-qr+k+
+-+n+pb-
bp-+-+pp
p-p-+-+-
P+NP-+-+
BPQ-+pP-
-+-+-PBP
+-+RR-K-

Evans-Donner 1971

Now Evans gives

19. Qxf3 Rxe1+ 20. Rxe1 Rb8 21. d5

-r-q-+k+
+-+n+pb-
bp-+-+pp
p-pP+-+-
P+N+-+-+
BP+-+QP-
-+-+-PBP
+-+-R-K-

with advantage.

 

 

|
Example games C2

Fischer - Ibrahimoglu, Siegen, 1970

1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 g6 4. Ngf3 Bg7 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Nbd7 10. Qe2 dxe4 11. dxe4 Qc7 12. a4 Rad8 13. Nb3 b6 14. Be3 c5 15. a5 e5

Black often plays ...e5 in the KIA Caro-Kann line, but here the light squares are very weak

16. Nd2 Ne8 17. axb6 axb6

-+-rnrk+
+-qn+pbp
-p-+-+p+
+-p-p-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-B-PP
-PPNQPB+
R-+-+RK-

18. Nb1 Qb7 19. Nc3 Nc7 20. Nb5 Qc6 21. Nxc7 Qxc7 22. Qb5 Ra8 23. c3 Rxa1 24. Rxa1 Rb8 25. Ra6 Bf8 26. Bf1 Kg7 27. Qa4 Rb7 28. Bb5

-+-+-b-+
+rqn+pkp
Rp-+-+p+
+Bp-p-+-
Q+-+P+-+
+-P-B-PP
-P-+-P-+
+-+-+-K-

White's domination of the Q-side is complete

28... Nb8 29. Ra8 Bd6 30. Qd1 Nc6 31. Qd2 h5 32. Bh6+ Kh7 33. Bg5 Rb8 34. Rxb8 Nxb8 35. Bf6 Nc6 36. Qd5 Na7 37. Be8 Kg8 38. Bxf7+ Qxf7 39. Qxd6 1-0

 

Hennigan - Hastings, Dundee, 1993

1. e4 c6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 g6 4. Ngf3 Bg7 5. Be2 Nd7 6. O-O Qc7 7. Re1 Ngf6 8. Bf1 Nb6 9. a4 a5 10. c3 O-O

r+b+-rk+
+pq-ppbp
-np+-np+
p-+p+-+-
P+-+P+-+
+-PP+N+-
-P-N-PPP
R-BQRBK-

If Black omits ...e5, White can proceed with the usual attack.

11. e5 Ng4 12. d4 h5 13. Nb3 Nh6 14. Bf4 Bg4 15. h3 Bxf3 16. Qxf3 e6 17. g4 hxg4 18. hxg4 Qe7 19. Nc5 Nc8 20. Qh3 g5 21. Bg3 b6 22. Nd3 c5

r+n+-rk+
+-+-qpb-
-p-+p+-n
p-ppP-p-
P+-P-+P+
+-PN+-BQ
-P-+-P-+
R-+-RBK-

23. f4 f5 24. exf6 Qxf6 25. Ne5 Ra7 26. Bd3 cxd4 27. Qh5

-+n+-rk+
r-+-+-b-
-p-+pq-n
p-+pN-pQ
P+-p-PP+
+-PB+-B-
-P-+-+-+
R-+-R-K-

1-0

 

 

C3. KIA vs. French 1. e4 e6: 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2

The lines mostly start with

2. d3 d5

2...c5 is also good; it can transpose to French lines considered below or stray into the Sicilian section.

3. Nd2 Nf6 4. Ngf3

Now after 4...c5 we enter the 'long variation' with

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1

or

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. Nbd2 Bd6 6. Bg2 Nge7 7. O-O O-O

See below for examples: all the same ideas and sacrifices crop up over and over again in your own games. The attack is good fun to play for White, and many Black players have come unstuck against it.

The important theory you must know about is, what if Black tries to avaoid the long variation? This can be awkward. I recommend you play 4. Ngf3, waiting for ...c5 until you play g3. Let's see why:

 

 

C3.1 Variations with 4. g3

Black, having seen you commit yourself to g3, can try and mess you up with either ...dxe4 or ...b6.

 

C3.1.1 French with 4... dxe4

5. dxe4 e5 6. Ngf3 Bc5 7. Bg2 Nc6

r+bqk+-r
ppp-+ppp
-+n+-n-+
+-b-p-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+NP-
PPPN-PBP
R-BQK-+R

8. O-O O-O 9. Qe2 a5 10. Nc4 Qe7

r+b+-rk+
+pp-qppp
-+n+-n-+
p-b-p-+-
-+N+P+-+
+-+-+NP-
PPP+QPBP
R-B-+RK-

now c3 or Ne3, with only a small White advantage.

 

C3.1.2 French with 4...b6

5. Bg2 Bb7

[The sneaky 5... Be7 should be met by 6. e5

[not 6. Ngf3 dxe4 7. dxe4 Ba6]

6...Nfd7 7. Ngf3 c5 8. O-O Nc6 9. Re1 Qc7 10. Qe2

r+b+k+-r
p-qnbppp
-pn+p+-+
+-ppP-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPPNQPBP
R-B-R-K-

holding the Pe5]

Now

6. e5 Nfd7

and ...f6 will be awkward.

 

C3.2 Variations with 4. Ngf6

C3.2.1 French with 4... b6

This is now more easily met, not by

 

[5. g3 dxe4 6. dxe4 Bb7 7. e5

[7. Qe2 Ba6]

7... Ne4 with an easy game]

nor

5. Qe2 Be7 6. g3 c5 7. Bg2 Nc6 8. O-O O-O 9. e5 Ne8 10. Re1 f5 11. exf6 Bxf6

r+bqnrk+
p-+-+-pp
-pn+pb-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPPNQPBP
R-B-R-K-

about equal =]

but by

5. e5 Nfd7 6. d4 c5 7. c3

with a normal-looking French

 

 

C3.2.1 French with 4... Nc6

Black plans simple development. You can play the very sensible

5. Be2

[5. g3 is also played, but is not necessarily the best square for the bishop e.g. 5... dxe4 6. dxe4 Bc5 7. Bb5 Bd7 8. O-O O-O 9. Qe2 Qe7 10. e5 Nd5 11. Ne4 Bb6 12. a3 f6]

5... dxe4 6. dxe4 Bc5 7. O-O O-O 8. c3 e5 9. b4

[9. Qc2 a5 = Radulov-Mednis1970]

9... Bb6 10. Qc2 Re8 =

 

 

Example games C3

Ciocaltea - Kozma, Sochi, 1963

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1

[8. e5 Ng4 9. Re1 f6 10. exf6 Bxf6 11. Nf1 += Evans-Bisguier 1955]

8... Qc7 9. e5 Nd7 10. Qe2 b5 11. Nf1 a5 12. h4 b4 13. Bf4 Ba6 14. Ne3 Ra7 15. h5 Rc8 16. h6 g6

-+r+-+k+
r-qnbp+p
b+n+p+pP
p-ppP-+-
-p-+-B-+
+-+PNNP-
PPP+QPB+
R-+-R-K-

17. Nxd5

Always this same sacrifice with the Q on c7 and the B on f4

17...exd5 18. e6 Qd8 19. exf7+

-+rq-+k+
r-+nbP+p
b+n+-+pP
p-pp+-+-
-p-+-B-+
+-+P+NP-
PPP+QPB+
R-+-R-K-

19... Kh8

[19... Kxf7 20. Qe6+ Kf8 21. Ng5 Bxg5 22. Bxd5]

20. Ne5

-+rq-+-k
r-+nbP+p
b+n+-+pP
p-ppN-+-
-p-+-B-+
+-+P+-P-
PPP+QPB+
R-+-R-K-

Black's pieces are too far away to contrive a defence.

20... Nf6

[20... Raa8 21. Nxc6 Rxc6 22. Be5+ Nxe5 23. Qxe5+ Bf6 24. Qe8+ Qxe8 25. fxe8=Q+ Rxe8 26. Rxe8#]

21. Nxc6 Rxc6 22. Qe5 Rd6 23. Bxd5

-+-q-+-k
r-+-bP+p
b+-r-npP
p-pBQ-+-
-p-+-B-+
+-+P+-P-
PPP+-P-+
R-+-R-K-

23... Bb5

[23... Rxd5 24. Qxf6+ Bxf6 25. Re8+ Qxe8 26. fxe8=Q#]

24. Bg5 Bc6 25. Bxc6 Rxc6 1-0

26. Qxf6+ Rxf6 27. Bxf6+ Bxf6 28. Re8+ Qxe8 29. fxe8=Q#

 

Fischer,RJ - Geller,U, Natanya, 1968

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 Qc7 9. e5 Nd7 10. Qe2 b5 11. Nf1 a5 12. h4 Nd4 13. Nxd4 cxd4 14. Bf4 Ra6

-+b+-rk+
+-qnbppp

r+-+p+-+
pp+pP-+-
-+-p-B-P
+-+P+-P-
PPP+QPB+
R-+-RNK-

15. Nh2

[The sacrifice is too early, I think: 15. Bxd5 Bb4 16. Reb1

[16.Rfc1? exd5; 17.e6, Rxe6; 18.Qxe6, Qxf4; 19.Qxd7, Qxc1! -+]

16... exd5 17. e6 Bd6 18. exd7 Bxd7 =]

15... Rc6 16. Rac1

-+b+-rk+
+-qnbppp
-+r+p+-+
pp+pP-+-
-+-p-B-P
+-+P+-P-
PPP+QPBN
+-R-R-K-

16... Ba6

[16... Qb6]

17. Bxd5 exd5

[17... Rc5 18. Be4 Rc8

[18...Nxe5? 19.c3!]

19. Nf3 Rxc2 20. Rxc2 Qxc2 21. Nxd4 Qxe2 22. Nxe2 Nc5]

18. e6 Qd8

[18... Bd6 19. Bxd6 Rxd6 20. exd7 Qxd7 21. Nf3 +-]

19. exd7 Re6 20. Qg4 f5 21. Qh5 Qxd7 22. Nf3 g6 23. Qh6 Bf6 24. Rxe6

-+-+-rk+
+-+q+-+p
b+-+RbpQ
pp+p+p+-
-+-p-B-P
+-+P+NP-
PPP+-P-+
+-R-+-K-

Fix

1-0

 

Bronstein - Uhlmann, Moscow, 1971

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5 Nd7 10. Nf1 a5 11. h4 b4 12. Bf4 Ba6 13. Ng5

Alternatives include 13.g4, 13.N1h2, 13.Ne3 and 13. h5

13... Qe8 14. Qg4

r+-+qrk+
+-+nbppp
b+n+p+-+
p-ppP-N-
-p-+-BQP
+-+P+-P-
PPP+-PB+
R-+-RNK-

[not 14. Qh5 h6 15. Nf3 f5]

14... a4??

[14... Kh8]

15. Nxe6 1-0

 

Fischer - Miagmasuren, Sousse, 1967

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nc6 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5 Nd7 10. Nf1 a5 11. h4 b4 12. Bf4 a4

Now a fine defensive move

13. a3 bxa3 14. bxa3

r+bq-rk+
+-+nbppp
-+n+p+-+
+-ppP-+-
p+-+-B-P
P-+P+NP-
-+P+-PB+
R-+QRNK-

14... Na5

[14... Ba6 or 14...Nd4]

15. Ne3 Ba6 16. Bh3 d4 17. Nf1 Nb6 18. Ng5 Nd5

[18... h6 19. Ne4 c4]

19. Bd2

r+-q-rk+
+-+-bppp
b+-+p+-+
n-pnP-N-
p+-p-+-P
P-+P+-PB
-+PB-P-+
R-+QRNK-

19... Bxg5

[19...c4 or 19... h6 20. Nxe6 fxe6 21. Bxe6+ Kh8 22. Bxa5 Qxa5 23. Bxd5]

20. Bxg5 Qd7 21. Qh5 Rfc8 22. Nd2 Nc3 23. Bf6!

r+r+-+k+
+-+q+ppp
b+-+pB-+
n-p-P-+Q
p+-p-+-P
P-nP+-PB
-+PN-P-+
R-+-R-K-

23... Qe8

[23... gxf6 24. exf6 Kh8 25. Nf3 Nd5 26. Ng5 Nxf6 27. Qh6 Qe7 28. Bf5 Rg8 29. Nxh7]

24. Ne4 g6 25. Qg5 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 c4 27. h5 cxd3 28. Rh4

r+r+q+k+
+-+-+p+p
b+-+pBp+
n-+-P-QP
p+-p-+-R
P-+p+-PB
-+P+-P-+
R-+-+-K-

28... Ra7

[28... dxc2 29. hxg6 c1=Q+ 30. Rxc1 Rxc1+ 31. Kh2 fxg6 32. Rxh7]

29. Bg2 dxc2

[29... Qf8 30. Be4 dxc2 31. hxg6 fxg6 32. Bxg6 hxg6 33. Rh8+ Kf7 34. Rh7+ Ke8 35. Rxa7]

30. Qh6 Qf8 31. Qxh7+

-+r+-qk+
r-+-+p+Q
b+-+pBp+
n-+-P-+P
p+-p-+-R
P-+-+-P-
-+p+-PB+
R-+-+-K-

1-0

31... Kxh7 32. hxg6+ Kxg6 33. Be4#

 

Fischer - Ivkov, Santa Monica, 1967

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. Nbd2 Bd6 6. Bg2 Nge7 7. O-O O-O

r+bq-rk+
pp+-nppp
-+nbp+-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPPN-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

Black's reaction looks logical and solid. But Fischer's reaction is so sharp and convincing that it put people off repeating it for years!

8. Nh4 b6 9. f4 dxe4 10. dxe4 Ba6 11. Re1 c4 12. c3 Na5 13. e5 Bc5+ 14. Kh1 Nd5 15. Ne4

r+-q-rk+
p-+-+ppp
bp-+p+-+
n-bnP-+-
-+p+NP-N
+-P-+-P-
PP-+-+BP
R-BQR-+K

The familiar White:King's-side/ Black: Queen's-side split has appeared.

15... Bb7 16. Qh5 Ne7 17. g4

r+-q-rk+
pb+-nppp
-p-+p+-+
n-b-P-+Q
-+p+NPPN
+-P-+-+-
PP-+-+BP
R-B-R-+K

Ready or not, here we come! Black decide to exchange the dangerous Ne4, but the recapture forces him to weaken the K-side.

17... Bxe4 18. Bxe4 g6 19. Qh6 Nd5 20. f5 Re8 21. fxg6 fxg6

r+-qr+k+
p-+-+-+p
-p-+p+pQ
n-bnP-+-
-+p+B+PN
+-P-+-+-
PP-+-+-P
R-B-R-+K

The position is ripe for sacrifice.

22. Nxg6 Qd7 23. Nf4 Rad8 24. Nh5 Kh8 25. Nf6 Nxf6 26. exf6 Rg8 27. Bf4 Rxg4 28. Rad1 Rdg8 29. f7 1-0

 

 

 

C4. KIA vs. Pirc/Modern 1. e4 ...d6/...g6: 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nge2 and 5. g3, 6. Bg2

Black has a lot of choice, as usual. In this system with 2. d4 instead of 2. d3, White means to play in the centre and hold on to the space by restraining Black's pawn breaks. When everything is secure and development is complete, you can think about where to expand yourself.

 

Example games C4


Short - Donner, Amsterdam, 1982 [B07]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nge2 Bg7 5. g3 O-O 6. Bg2 e5 7. O-O

[7. h3 is better]

7... exd4

[7... Nc6 is much better]

8. Nxd4 Nc6 9. Nde2

r+bq-rk+
ppp-+pbp
-+np-np+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-N-+-P-
PPP+NPBP
R-BQ+RK-

Avoiding exchanges

9... Re8 10. h3 Nd7 11. Kh2 Nb6 12. a4 a5 13. b3

r+bqr+k+
+pp-+pbp
-nnp-+p+
p-+-+-+-
P+-+P+-+
+PN-+-PP
-+P+NPBK
R-BQ+R+-

Black has little counterplay, and can just wait for White to decide how and when to break. Short is a genius in these positions.

13... Nb4 14. Be3 Nd7 15. Qd2 Nc5 16. Rad1 Qe7 17. Rfe1 Nca6 ?! 18. Nf4 Bd7 19. Nfd5 Qd8 20. Bg5 f6 21. Be3 Bc6 22. Bd4 Bd7 23. Be3 Nxd5 24. Nxd5 b6?

r+-qr+k+
+-pb+-bp
np-p-pp+
p-+N+-+-
P+-+P+-+
+P+-B-PP
-+PQ-PBK
+-+RR-+-

Thous shalt not open lines for your opponent's fianchettoed bishop

25. e5 Rxe5 26. Nxb6 cxb6 27. Qxd6

r+-q-+k+
+-+b+-bp
np-Q-pp+
p-+-r-+-
P+-+-+-+
+P+-B-PP
-+P+-PBK
+-+RR-+-

27... Rxe3 28. Rxe3 Ra7 29. Re7 Nb8 30. Qe6+ 1-0

 

 

C5. KIA vs. Sicilian

The KIA can be played against all lines of the Sicilian, and in fact many French variations start off in the Sicilian (e.g. 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d3).

Again, we won't bother too much about variations and get straight into the games. A few you do need to know about:

C5.1 KIA Sicilian with 2...d6

3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2

r+bqkbnr
pp+-pppp
-+np-+-+
+-p-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+NP-
PPPP-PBP
RNBQK-+R

C5.1.1 Sicilian with 4... g6

The best way to develop the Bf8.

5. O-O Bg7 6. c3 e5 7. d3 Nge7 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. a4 h6 10. Nc4 Be6 11. Qe2 Qc7

r+-+-rk+
ppq-npb-
-+npb+pp
+-p-p-+-
P+N+P+-+
+-PP+NP-
-P-+QPBP
R-B-+RK-

Now either 12. Nfd2 or 12. Bd2 with only a small edge.

 

 

C5.1.2 Sicilian with 4... Nf6

Forces d3 and avoids c3/d4 lines.

5. d3 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. Nbd2 O-O 8. a4

r+bq-rk+
pp+-ppbp
-+np-np+
+-p-+-+-
P+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
-PPN-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

As in a couple of Bobby Fischer games from the early part of his career.

 

C5.2 KIA Sicilian with ...e6 and ...g6

If Black plays the Bf8 to e7 or d6 we have French lines. But Nc6 and Ng7 is the best set-up for Black against the Closed Sicilian, and many will play it against the KIA.

 

After

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. Nbd2 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7. O-O Nge7

you can play the traditional

8. Re1 (Yudasin-Jukic, 1989)

or the new and exciting line

8. exd5 (Dvoretsky - Vulfsson, 1986)

Both are given below.

 

You can also play g3 lines in most variations of the Open Sicilian: 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 (...) 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 (...) 6. g3.

 

 

|
Example games C5

|
Fischer,Robert J - Sherwin,James T, New Jersey, 1957

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 Nf6 5. Bg2 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nbd2 Rb8 8. Re1 d6 9. c3 b6 10. d4 Qc7 11. e5 Nd5 12. exd6 Bxd6 13. Ne4 c4

-rb+-rk+
p-q-+ppp
-pnbp+-+
+-+n+-+-
-+pPN+-+
+-P-+NP-
PP-+-PBP
R-BQR-K-

Characteristically, Fischer selects the simple and clear theme of winning the bishop pair.

14. Nxd6 Qxd6 15. Ng5 Nce7 16. Qc2 Ng6 17. h4 Nf6

-rb+-rk+
p-+-+ppp
-p-qpnn+
+-+-+-N-
-+pP-+-P
+-P-+-P-
PPQ+-PB+
R-B-R-K-

"Tactics flow from a superior position" - Fischer

18. Nxh7 Nxh7 19. h5 Nh4 20. Bf4 Qd8 21. gxh4 Rb7 22. h6 Qxh4 23. hxg7 Kxg7 24. Re4 Qh5 25. Re3 f5 26. Rh3 Qe8 27. Be5+ Nf6 28. Qd2 Kf7 29. Qg5 Qe7 30. Bxf6 Qxf6

-+b+-r-+
pr+-+k+-
-p-+pq-+
+-+-+pQ-
-+pP-+-+
+-P-+-+R
PP-+-PB+
R-+-+-K-

31. Rh7+ Ke8 32. Qxf6 Rxh7 33. Bc6+ 1-0

 

Smyslov - Botvinnik, USSR Ch, 1955

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. O-O O-O 5. d3 c5 6. e4 Nc6 7. Nbd2 d6 8. a4

r+bq-rk+
pp+-ppbp
-+np-np+
+-p-+-+-
P+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
-PPN-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

A standard flexible set-up for White

8... Ne8 9. Nc4 e5 10. c3 f5

r+bqnrk+
pp+-+-bp
-+np-+p+
+-p-pp+-
P+N+P+-+
+-PP+NP-
-P-+-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

White has prepared a strong positional pawn sacrifice

11. b4 cxb4 12. cxb4 fxe4 13. dxe4 Be6 14. Ne3 Nxb4 15. Rb1 a5 16. Ba3 Nc7 17. Bxb4 axb4 18. Rxb4 Bh6 19. Rb6 Bxe3 20. fxe3 Bc4

r+-q-rk+
+pn-+-+p
-R-p-+p+
+-+-p-+-
P+b+P+-+
+-+-PNP-
-+-+-+BP
+-+Q+RK-

The Black game is teetering

21. Rxd6 Qe8 22. Re1 Rf7 23. Ng5 Re7 24. Bf1 Bxf1 25. Rxf1 Qxa4 26. Rd8+ Re8 27. Qf3 Qc4 28. Rd7 1-0

 

Yudasin-Jukic, Bern 1989

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. Nbd2 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. Re1 b6 9. h4 h6 10. c3 a5 11. a4 Ra7

All as in Ljubojevic-Kasparov, Niksic 1983. Now best is

12. exd5 exd5 13. Nb3 d4 14. cxd4 cxd4 15. Bf4

-+bqk+-r
r-+-npb-
-pn+-+pp
p-+-+-+-
P+-p-B-P
+N+P+NP-
-P-+-PB+
R-+QR-K-

...with White's pieces being better placed in the more open position.

15... O-O 16. Ne5 Nxe5 17. Bxe5 Bxe5 18. Rxe5 Qd6 19. Qe2 Be6 20. Nd2 Nc6

Now a great exchange sacrifice

21. Rxe6 fxe6 22. Nc4 Qd7

-+-+-rk+
r-+q+-+-
-pn+p+pp
p-+-+-+-
P+Np-+-P
+-+P+-P-
-P-+QPB+
R-+-+-K-

Black has no counterplay

23. Nxb6 Qe8 24. Rc1 Ne7 25. Qxe6+ Qf7 26. Qe2 Qb3 27. Nc4 Qxa4 28. Qe6+ Kg7 29. Qb6 Rd7 30. Ne5 Rdd8

[30... Rf6 31. Qc5]

31. Rc7 Qe8 32. Qe6 1-0

 

Dvoretsky - Vulfsson, USSR, 1986

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. Nbd2 g6 6. Bg2 Bg7 7. O-O Nge7 8. exd5

Black has a choice

8... exd5

[8... Nxd5 9. Nb3 b6 10. c4 Nde7 11. d4

r+bqk+-r
p-+-npbp
-pn+p+p+
+-p-+-+-
-+PP-+-+
+N+-+NP-
PP-+-PBP
R-BQ+RK-

with advantage]

9. d4 cxd4

[not 9... c4 releasing the tension:

10. c3 Bf5 11. Re1 O-O 12. Nf1 Re8 13. Bf4 h6 14. h4 f6 15. Ne3 Be4 16. Bh3 Kh7 17. b4 a6 18. a4 Ng8 19. g4 g5 20. Bg3 Qd7 21. Nd2 Bg6 22. Bg2 Nge7 23. f4 gxh4 24. Bxh4

r+-+r+-+
+p+qn-bk
p+n+-pbp
+-+p+-+-
PPpP-PPB
+-P-N-+-
-+-N-+B+
R-+QR-K-

with advantage]

[Nor 9... Nxd4 10. Nxd4 Bxd4 11. Nb3]

10. Nb3 Qb6 11. Bg5

[Even better was 11. Bf4!

e.g. 11...Bf5

[or 11... d3 12. c3 Bf5 13. Re1 O-O 14. Nh4 Be6 15. Qxd3

r+-+-rk+
pp+-npbp
-qn+b+p+
+-+p+-+-
-+-+-B-N
+NPQ+-P-
PP-+-PBP
R-+-R-K-

with play against the IQP]

[or 11... O-O 12. Bd6 d3 13. c3 Rd8 14. Bc5 Qc7 15. Qxd3 Nf5 16. Rfe1 Na5 17. Qb5 Nc6 18. Rad1 Nd6 19. Qe2 Ne4 20. Be3 h6 21. c4 dxc4 22. Qxc4 Rxd1 23. Rxd1 Qe7 24. Nh4

r+b+-+k+
pp+-qpb-
-+n+-+pp
+-+-+-+-
-+Q+n+-N
+N+-B-P-
PP-+-PBP
+-+R+-K-

with advantage]

12. Bd6 O-O 13. Re1 Rfe8 14. Bc5 Qc7 15. Bxd4 Nxd4 16. Nfxd4

r+-+r+k+
ppq-npbp
-+-+-+p+
+-+p+b+-
-+-N-+-+
+N+-+-P-
PPP+-PBP
R-+QR-K-

11... Nf5

[11... O-O 12. Nfxd4 Nf5 may have been better than what was played]

12. Re1+ Be6 13. g4 Nd6

r+-+k+-r
pp+-+pbp
-qnnb+p+
+-+p+-B-
-+-p-+P+
+N+-+N+-
PPP+-PBP
R-+QR-K-

14. Nfxd4!!

This gives White a prolonged initiative

14...Bxd4

[14... Nxd4 15. Be3 N6b5 16. a4]

15. Nxd4 Qxd4

[15... Nxd4 16. Bf6]

16. Bxd5 O-O 17. Bxc6 Qc5

The best defence.

[17... Qxg4+ 18. Qxg4 Bxg4 19. Bg2]

[17... Qxd1 18. Raxd1 bxc6 19. Rxd6 Bxg4 20. Rxc6]

18. Bf3 Qxg5 19. Qxd6 Rac8 20. c3 Qb5 21. Rad1 Bxa2 22. Rd2 Rfd8 23. Qxd8+ Rxd8 24. Rxd8+ Kg7 25. Rd2 h5 26. h3 Be6 27. Re4 a5 28. Red4 hxg4 29. hxg4 Qg5 30. Kg2 b6 31. Re2 Qc5 32. Kg3 Qb5 33. Rdd2 Qg5 34. Re3 Qc5

[34... f5 35. Rd4]

Time trouble I think affects both players, and the game rolls to a halt

35. Be2 Qc6 ? 36. f3 ?

[36. f4! with good winning chances]

36... g5 37. Rd4 Qc7+ 38. Kg2 Kf6 39. Bd3 Qc5 40. Be4 Qb5 41. Rd2 Qe5 42. Ree2 Qb5 43. Bb7 Qc5 44. Rd4 b5 45. Red2

-+-+-+-+
+B+-+p+-
-+-+bk-+
ppq-+-p-
-+-R-+P+
+-P-+P+-
-P-R-+K+
+-+-+-+-

idea Bd5

45... Ke5 1/2

If this is all too hair-raising, you can always play more quietly at move 8.

 


Karlsson - George, Torbay, 1994[B40]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d3 d5 4. Nbd2 Nc6 5. g3 b6 6. Bg2 Bb7 7. O-O Bd6 8. Re1 Nge7

r+-qk+-r
pb+-nppp
-pnbp+-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+P+NP-
PPPN-PBP
R-BQR-K-

9. Ng5 O-O 10. Qh5 h6 11. Ndf3 Nd4 12. e5 Bc7 13. Nxd4 cxd4 14. Nf3 Nf5 15. g4 Ne7

r+-q-rk+
pbb-npp-
-p-+p+-p
+-+pP-+Q
-+-p-+P+
+-+P+N+-
PPP+-PBP
R-B-R-K-

16. Bxh6 Ng6

[16... gxh6 17. Qxh6 f6 18. exf6 Nf5 19. Qg6+ Kh8 20. Rxe6 Bc8 21. gxf5 Bxe6 22. Qg7#]

17. Bd2 Qb8 18. Ng5 Rd8 19. Bb4

rq-r-+k+
pbb-+pp-
-p-+p+n+
+-+pP-NQ
-B-p-+P+
+-+P+-+-
PPP+-PBP
R-+-R-K-

19... Nf8 20. Qxf7+ Kh8 21. Bxf8 1-0

 

D. A single repertoire for attacking the unusual semi-open defences

 

D1. Center Counter (Scandanavian) 1...d5

In recent years several GMs have experimented with this move, and for some it is a regular part of their repertoire. Someone once described this as a line for "Black players who want to suck all the life out of the position".

After 2. exd5 Qxd5 Black will be behind in development for a long time, but will also be very solid. I have been frustrated by trying to beat this annoying defence even with a useful space advantage.

I advise you to make an immediate deviation from theory, with

1. e4 d5 2. Nc3

rnbqkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+p+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
R-BQKBNR

Black has a choice: advance, exchange, or defend. In practice Black does not usually defend the pawn, and any defence will transpose to lines considered above.

There is precious little published theory on this line and a lot of scope to improvise.

 

D1.1. Advance with 2...d4

rnbqkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-pP+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
R-BQKBNR

White retreats with

3. Nce2

and plans to play Bc4 with ideas of attacking on the K-side.

Black should probably continue

3...e5 4. Ng3

when there is a lot of choice.

4...g6

is logical, hoping to cramp the Ng3, but the best move here is not known. The Ng3 need not stay cramped...


Van Geet - Guyt [A00] Paramaribo, 1967

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 g6 5. Bc4 Bg7 6. d3 c5 7. Nf3 Nc6 8. c3 Nge7 9. Ng5 O-O

r+bq-rk+
pp+-npbp
-+n+-+p+
+-p-p-N-
-+BpP+-+
+-PP+-N-
PP-+-PPP
R-BQK-+R

10. Nh5 Bh8 ? 11. Qf3 Qe8 12. Nf6+ Bxf6 13. Qxf6 dxc3?

r+b+qrk+
pp+-np+p
-+n+-Qp+
+-p-p-N-
-+B+P+-+
+-pP+-+-
PP-+-PPP
R-B-K-+R

13...Na5 was essential

14. Nxf7 Rxf7 15. Bh6 1-0

 

D1.2. Exchange with 2...dxe4

White recaptures with

3. Nxe4

rnbqkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+N+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
R-BQKBNR

and (guess what?) plans to play 4. Bc4 with ideas of attacking on the K-side.

Now 3...c6 and 3...e6 will transpose to lines considered above.

3...Bf5 4. Ng3 Ng6 5. Bc4 e6 can also transpose to the Caro-Kann, or if you want to be independent you can go 6. Bc4 Nd7 7. d3

The best-looking move in reply is of course

3...e5

when we follow up with

4. Bc4

after which at least three correspondence(!) games have continued

4...Be7 5. Qh5 Nh6 6. d3 1-0

More careful is

4...Nc6

[The natural 4...Nf6 is bad after 5. Ng5!]

after which

5. d3 Be7 6. Nf3

6. Ng5 is to be considered; 6...Bxg5 7. Qh5

r+bqk+nr
ppp-+ppp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-p-bQ
-+B+-+-+
+-+P+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-B-K-NR

with the two bishops

6...h6

6...Nf6 7. Neg5 O-O 8. Nxf7 Rxf7 9. Ng5 Nd5 10. Nxf7 Kxf7 11. Qf3 reminds us of the Fried Liver in the Two Knights' Defence

7. Bb5 Qd5 8. c4 Qe6 9.O-O Bd7 10. Re1 O-O-O 11. Nc3

-+kr-+nr
pppbbpp-
-+n+q+-p
+B+-p-+-
-+P+-+-+
+-NP+N+-
PP-+-PPP
R-BQR-K-

+= Van Geet-Sandklef corr 1982

 

 

Example games D1

I have included quite a lot of games in this section because they are hard to find in the books and magazines.

We will look at a few games in what is Black's strongest idea in the advance (2...d4) line, then look at a few in the exchange (2...dxe4) lines.

Brouwn,Arnold - Perrenet,Jacob cr, 1971

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 Be6

Else 5. Bc4 will follow. This looks like Black's best idea to me.

5. Nf3 f6 6. Be2 Nh6 7. O-O c5 8. Bb5+ Nd7 9. d3 g6 10. b3 Bg7

r+-qk+-r
pp+n+-bp
-+-+bppn
+Bp-p-+-
-+-pP+-+
+P+P+NN-
P+P+-PPP
R-BQ+RK-

White now aims to exchange the light-squared bishop

11. Bc4 Qe7 12. Bxe6 Qxe6 13. a4 O-O-O 14. a5 f5 15. Ng5 Qe7 16. exf5 gxf5 17. a6 b6 18. Qf3 e4 19. Nxf5 Nxf5 20. Nxe4 Rdf8 21. Bg5 Qe6 22. Nc3 Bf6

-+k+-r-r
p-+n+-+p
Pp-+qb-+
+-p-+nB-
-+-p-+-+
+PNP+Q+-
-+P+-PPP
R-+-+RK-

23. Qa8+ Nb8 24. Qb7+ Kd8 25. Bxf6+ Rxf6 26. Ne4 Rg6 27. Qxb8+ Qc8 28. Qxa7 Ne7 29. Rfe1 Nd5 30. Qb7 Rxg2+ 31. Kxg2 1-0

 

Ekebjaerg,Ove - Strand,Torger cr Nielsen-mem, 1987

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 Be6 5. Nf3 Nd7 6. c3 c5 7.cxd4 cxd4 8. Be2 Bd6 9. O-O h5 10. d3

r+-qk+nr
pp+n+pp-
-+-bb+-+
+-+-p-+p
-+-pP+-+
+-+P+NN-
PP-+BPPP
R-BQ+RK-

This doesn't look to me very promising for White.

10... h4 11. Nf5 Bxf5 12. exf5 Qb6 13. Nd2 Bc7 14. Bf3 Ne7 15. Be4 Nc5 16. Qf3 f6 17. b3 Nxe4 18. Nxe4

r+-+k+-r
ppb-n-p-
-q-+-p-+
+-+-pP+-
-+-pN+-p
+P+P+Q+-
P+-+-PPP
R-B-+RK-

It is considered rude to start chanting 'weak Willie WhiteSquares' in such positions

18... Kf7 19. Ba3 Rag8 20. Bc5 Qa6 21. Rfc1 Bb8 22. Rc2 g5 23. h3 b5 24. Bxe7 Kxe7

-b-+-+rr
p-+-k-+-
q+-+-p-+
+p+-pPp-
-+-pN+-p
+P+P+Q+P
P+R+-PP+
R-+-+-K-

With the exchange of the Knight, Black's position falls apart.

25. Nxf6 Kxf6 26. Rc6+ Qxc6 27. Qxc6+ Kxf5 28. g4+ hxg3 29. fxg3 1-0

 

Leeners - Simon, Netherlands, 1979

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 e5 4. Ng3 Be6 5. Nf3 Nd7 6. c3 c5 7. Bb5 Bd6 8. O-O f6 9. Nh4 g6 10. d3 a6 11. Ba4 b5 12. Bb3 Nf8 13. cxd4 cxd4 14. f4

r+-qknnr
+-+-+-+p
p+-bbpp+
+p+-p-+-
-+-pPP-N
+B+P+-N-
PP-+-+PP
R-BQ+RK-

With the obvious threat of f5

14... Bxb3 15. Qxb3 exf4 16. Bxf4 Bxf4 17. Rxf4 Qc7 18. Rff1 Rc8 19. Rac1 Qd7 20. Rxc8+ Qxc8 21. e5 f5

-+q+knnr
+-+-+-+p
p+-+-+p+
+p+-Pp+-
-+-p-+-N
+Q+P+-N-
PP-+-+PP
+-+-+RK-

22. Nhxf5 gxf5 23. Nxf5 Kd8 24. Nd6 1-0

 

Van Geet,Dick - Van der Zijpp,B, Haarlem, 1991

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 c5 4. Ng3 Nc6 5. Bc4 g6 6. f4

r+bqkbnr
pp+-pp+p
-+n+-+p+
+-p-+-+-
-+BpPP-+
+-+-+-N-
PPPP-+PP
R-BQK-NR

A familiar plan.

6... e6 7. Nf3 Bg7 8. a4 Nge7 9. d3 O-O 10. h4 e5 11. f5 gxf5 12. Ng5 Qd6 13. exf5 Bxf5 14. Nxf5 Nxf5 15. Ne4 Qg6 16. g4

r+-+-rk+
pp+-+pbp
-+n+-+q+
+-p-pn+-
P+BpN+PP
+-+P+-+-
-PP+-+-+
R-BQK-+R

1-0

16... Ne3 17. Bxe3 dxe3 18. h5 e2 19. Qxe2 Qh6 20. g5 1-0

 

Now a few in the exchange lines

 

|


Suba,M - Bellon, Bucharest, 1978[A00]

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nxe4 Nf6 4. Nxf6+ gxf6 5. Bc4 Nc6 6. Qh5

r+bqkb-r
ppp-pp+p
-+n+-p-+
+-+-+-+Q
-+B+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
R-B-K-NR

White is trying to get Black to play ...e6, locking in the Bc8

6... Ne5 7. Bb3 Qd6 8. f4 Ng6 9. Ne2 f5 10. d4 Be6 11. g4

r+-+kb-r
ppp-pp+p
-+-qb+n+
+-+-+p+Q
-+-P-PP+
+B+-+-+-
PPP+N+-P
R-B-K-+R

Well, the bishop is out on e6, but White now embarks on a long and unclear attacking sequence that eventually nets him material.

11... Bxb3 12. axb3 Qd5 13. Rf1 e6 14. c4 Qe4 15. gxf5 exf5 16. Bd2 Qc2 17. Rc1 Qxb3 18. Qxf5 Be7 19. Qg4 Bh4+ 20. Ng3

r+-+k+-r
ppp-+p+p
-+-+-+n+
+-+-+-+-
-+PP-PQb
+q+-+-N-
-P-B-+-P
+-R-KR+-

It's hard to say whose king is more in danger!

20... Kf8 21. Rf2 Re8+ 22. Kf1 Qd3+ 23. Kg1 Qxd4 24. Bc3 Qe3

-+-+rk-r
ppp-+p+p
-+-+-+n+
+-+-+-+-
-+P+-PQb
+-B-q-N-
-P-+-R-P
+-R-+-K-

25. Re1 Qxe1+ 26. Bxe1 Rxe1+ 27. Rf1 Bxg3 28. hxg3 Re3 29. f5 Ne5 30. Qd4 1-0

 


Ratsch - Schwarz, DDR tt, 1969 [A00]

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nxe4 Nc6 4. Bc4 e6

This could have arisen from the French Defence.

5. Nf3 Be7 6. O-O Nf6 7. Ng3 O-O 8. d4 a6 9. c3

r+bq-rk+
+pp-bppp
p+n+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+BP-+-+
+-P-+NN-
PP-+-PPP
R-BQ+RK-

White is simply a little better all round.

9... b5 10. Bb3 Bb7 11. Re1 Na5 12. Bc2 Nc4 13. Qd3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 Qd5 15. Ne4 Nd6 16. Nxf6+ Bxf6 17. Qh3 g6 18. Bh6 Rfe8

r+-+r+k+
+-p-+p+p
p+-npbpB
+p+q+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-P-+-+Q
PPB+-PPP
R-+-R-K-

White's more active pieces are nagging away at the Black position

19. Bb3 Nc4 20. Bf4 Qc6 21. Bc2 Rad8 22. Be4 Qb6 23. Qf3 e5 24. dxe5 Bxe5 25. Bg5 f6 26. Bh6 Kh8 27. Bc6 Re6 28. Rad1

-+-r-+-k
+-p-+-+p
pqB+rppB
+p+-b-+-
-+n+-+-+
+-P-+Q+-
PP-+-PPP
+-+RR-K-

Black's back rank is in danger

28... Red6 29. Rxd6 Rxd6 30. Bxb5 1-0

Told you!

 


Schlenker,Rainer - Zimmermann,G, Heidelberg, 1985[A00]

1. Nc3 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e4 c5 4. exd5 exd5 5. d4

This could have arisen from the French Defence.

rnbqkbnr
pp+-+ppp
-+-+-+-+
+-pp+-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-N-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKB+R

Black has been tempted to occupy the centre, but this move show it up as a target (6.dxc5, exposing the d-pawn, is one threat). So Black decides to seal off the centre on the ninth move.

5... Nc6 6. Bb5 a6 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 8. O-O Bd6 9. Be3 c4 10. Ne5 Qc7 11. Qh5 Be6 12. f4 g6 13. Qh4

r+-+k+nr
+-q-+p+p
p+pbb+p+
+-+pN-+-
-+pP-P-Q
+-N-B-+-
PPP+-+PP
R-+-+RK-

Black's centre is more of a liability than an asset.

13... Be7 14. Qg3 f6 15. f5 fxe5 16. fxe6 Bd6 17. Rf7 Ne7 18. Qh4

r+-+k+-r
+-q-nR+p
p+pbP+p+
+-+pp-+-
-+pP-+-Q
+-N-B-+-
PPP+-+PP
R-+-+-K-

18... Nf5 19. Rxc7 Nxh4 20. Rxc6 Nf5 21. Nxd5 exd4 22. Bg5 1-0

 


Staples,M - Lee,G, England, 1976[A00]

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nxe4 e6 4. Bc4 Be7 5. Qg4 g6 6. Qe2 Nc6 7. Nf3

r+bqk+nr
ppp-bp+p
-+n+p+p+
+-+-+-+-
-+B+N+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPPPQPPP
R-B-K-+R

This could have arisen from a French Defence.

7... e5 8. Bb5 f5

r+bqk+nr
ppp-b-+p
-+n+-+p+
+B+-pp+-
-+-+N+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPPPQPPP
R-B-K-+R

Black has been tempted to lash out before completing his development. Punishment is swift.

9. Nxe5 fxe4 10. Qc4 Nh6 11. d3 Bd7 12. Bxc6 Bxc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14. Bxh6

r+-qk+-r
p-p-b-+p
-+p+-+pB
+-+-+-+-
-+Q+p+-+
+-+P+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+-K-+R

Black is busted.

14... Qd5 15. Qxe4 Qxe4+ 16. dxe4 Bf6 17. O-O-O Rb8 18. e5 1-0

 


Van Geet,Dick - Lee, Wijk aan Zee III, 1979[A00]

1. Nc3 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nxe4 e6 4. Nf3 Nd7 5. Bc4 Ngf6 6. d3 Be7 7. Qe2 a6 8. O-O

r+bqk+-r
+ppnbppp
p+-+pn-+
+-+-+-+-
-+B+N+-+
+-+P+N+-
PPP+QPPP
R-B-+RK-

White has nicely centralised development, against another French-style line.

8... b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 10. c3 O-O

White siezes on the d6 square.

11. Bf4 c5 12. Nd6 Bxf3 13. Qxf3 e5

r+-q-rk+
+-+nbppp
p+-N-n-+
+pp-p-+-
-+-+-B-+
+BPP+Q+-
PP-+-PPP
R-+-+RK-

White's next move must have been a shock. If ...exf4, Re1 with advantage.

14. Nf5 c4 15. Bh6 cxb3 16. Bxg7 Ne8 17. Qg3 Bg5 18. Bh6 Kh8 19. Bxg5 f6 20. Be3 bxa2 21. Rxa2 Qc7 22. Qf3 Nd6 23. Raa1 Nxf5 24. Qxf5 Rg8 25. Qf3 a5 26. d4

r+-+-+rk
+-qn+-+p
-+-+-p-+
pp+-p-+-
-+-P-+-+
+-P-BQ+-
-P-+-PPP
R-+-+RK-

Black's game falls apart after this line-opening strike.

26... a4 27. dxe5 fxe5 28. Qd5 Rab8 29. Rad1 Nf6 30. Qe6 Rg6 31. Rfe1 Qb7 32. g3 Ng4 33. Qf5 Rbg8 34. Rd7 Qc8 35. Red1 a3 36. bxa3 Qxc3 37. Bg5 Qxa3 38. Qxg4 Rxg5 39. Qh4 h5 40. Qe4 R8g7 41. Rd8+ Rg8 42. R1d7 Qa1+ 43. Kg2 R5g7 1-0

 

 

D2. Gurgenidze Defence ...c6/...d5/...g6

Black plans to gum everything up by encouraging e5, then developing around it.

I assume you don't want this to happen, and want to avoid it. You can if you are careful with move order.

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2!

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 c6 4. Bc4!

1. e4 g6 2. d4 c6 3. c4!

 

 

Example games D2


Tong,Y - Webster,A [B08], Ch World Cadet's ( under 18 ), Singapore

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 c6

Black intends ...d5.

4. Bc4 d6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. O-O d5 7. Bd3 dxe4 8. Nxe4 Nxe4 9. Bxe4 Nd7 10. Re1 O-O 11. c3

r+bq-rk+
pp+nppbp
-+p+-+p+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PB+-+
+-P-+N+-
PP-+-PPP
R-BQR-K-

This position reminds me rather of the Colle.

11... c5 12. Bg5 Nf6 13. Bc2 cxd4 14. Nxd4 Re8 15. Bb3 Qa5 16. Bh4 Bg4 17. Qd3 Rad8 18. Qc4 Nd5 19. h3 Bc8

-+brr+k+
pp+-ppbp
-+-+-+p+
q-+n+-+-
-+QN-+-B
+BP-+-+P
PP-+-PP+
R-+-R-K-

White continues to improve his position, and has more space.

20. Bxe7 Rd7 21. Bh4 Rf8 22. Rad1 a6 23. Nf3 Nf6 24. Rxd7 Bxd7 25. Ng5 Bc6 26. Qd3 h6

-+-+-rk+
+p+-+pb-
p+b+-npp
q-+-+-N-
-+-+-+-B
+BPQ+-+P
PP-+-PP+
+-+-R-K-

Time for the harvest.

27. Nxf7 Bd5 28. Bxf6 Bxb3 29. Qxg6 1-0

 


Bousum,J - Forbis,R [B08], It (open), Chicago

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 c6 4. Bc4 d6

Again, the ...d5 idea is discouraged.

5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bb3 O-O 7. O-O Na6 8. Qe2 Qa5 9. Bd2 Qh5 10. e5

r+b+-rk+
pp+-ppbp
n+pp-np+
+-+-P-+q
-+-P-+-+
+BN-+N+-
PPPBQPPP
R-+-+RK-

10... dxe5 11. dxe5 Ng4 12. Rfe1 Nc7 13. h3 Nh6 14. Ne4 Be6

r+-+-rk+
ppn-ppbp
-+p+b+pn
+-+-P-+q
-+-+N+-+
+B+-+N+P
PPPBQPP+
R-+-R-K-

15. Ng3 1-0

 

 

D3. Nimzovitch Defence

r+bqkbnr
pppppppp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
RNBQKBNR

Surprising numbers of master games in the 1.e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 openings actually start 1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 e5. Not what I recommend...

1. e4 Nc6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4

[3... e6 4. e5 is The Guimard Variation, a poor line of the French where Black can hit at the centre only by losing time with the Knight to play ...c5, or risk exposing the King with ...f6]

4. d5

r+bqkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+n+-+-+
+-+P+-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQKBNR

4...Ne5

[4... Nb8 5. f3 exf3 6. Qxf3 Nf6 7. Bf4 a6 8. h3

rnbqkb-r
+pp-pppp
p+-+-n-+
+-+P+-+-
-+-+-B-+
+-N-+Q+P
PPP+-+P+
R-+-KBNR

+-]

5. Qd4

[5. f3 and 5. Bf4 are alternatives]

After 5. Qd4 White has a nice game.

 

Example games D3


Goring - NN, Berlin, 1890[B00]

1. Nc3 Nc6 2. d4 d5 3. e4 dxe4 4. d5 Ne5

After an unusual start we arrive at the usual Nimzovitch line

5. Bf4 Bg4

r+-qkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+Pn-+-
-+-+pBb+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QKBNR

Black provokes a great combination

6. Bxe5 Bxd1 7. Bb5+ c6 8. dxc6

r+-qkbnr
pp+-pppp
-+P+-+-+
+B+-B-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+bK-NR

8... Bg4 9. cxb7+ Bd7 10. Bxd7+ Kxd7 11. O-O-O+ Ke6 12. Rxd8 Rxd8 13. b8=Q 1-0

 


Schlenker,Rainer - Fuchs,D, Germany, 1985 [B00]

1. Nc3 Nc6 2. d4 d5 3. e4 dxe4 4. d5 Ne5 5. Qd4 Ng6

r+bqkbnr
ppp-pppp
-+-+-+n+
+-+P+-+-
-+-Qp+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-B-KBNR

Again the Nimzovitch arises by transposition.

6. h4 e5 7. Qxe4 Nf6 8. Bb5+ c6 9. dxc6

r+bqkb-r
pp+-+ppp
-+P+-nn+
+B+-p-+-
-+-+Q+-P
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
R-B-K-NR

Another Queen sacrifice!

9... Nxe4 10. c7+ Qd7 11. Bxd7+ Bxd7 12. Nxe4 Rc8 13. h5

-+r+kb-r
ppPb+ppp
-+-+-+n+
+-+-p-+P
-+-+N+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PP+
R-B-K-NR

Which way should the night jump?

13... Ne7 14. Nd6# 1-0

Not that way!

 

|
D4. Other defences

Rarer continuations include

 

D4(a) 1...b6 ( Owen's Defence

which can be met with by

2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3

rn-qkbnr
pbpppppp
-p-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-+B+-+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-NR

Black can probably develop each piece but will have trouble finding a middle-game plan. If the centre is blocked with ...d5, then the Bb7 will suffer, and if the centre is left flexible, Black's cramped pieces may be overrun by White's pawns belting down the centre.

It was discovered that

3...

f5

4. exf5 Bxg7 5. Qh5+ g6 6. fxg6 Bg7 7. gxh7+ Kf8 8. Nf3!

(8. hxg8+ is actually better for Black because White must now lose a move: 9. Qg4 Bxh1, 10. h4 Bd5! 11. h5 Be6­, but 8. Ne2 may also be a strong move)

8...Nf6 9. Qg6! is probably a win for White (9...Bxh1 10. Bh6! or 9...Bxf3 10. Rg1).

So 3. Bd3 is more likely to be met with by

3...e6,

when

4. c4!

is a good reply - 4...f5 doesn't obviously lose but is still currently uncomfortable for Black.

 

1. e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3

Nc6

may be best for Black, although White is still better (

 

 

D4(b) St.George's Defence 1...a6,

The idea of this move, popularised by Mike Basman, is that in the Owen's lines, the ...f5 sacrificial line is awful and others may lead to your Nf6 getting squashed by e5 Nd5 and c4.

So ...a6 and ...b5 hopefully gives more chances to fight back in the gambit lines, and gives an outpost on d5 if White plays e5. It all looks a bit loose to me, and some of the middle-game awkwardness of the Owen's Defence still holds.

I have always thought

1...a6

deserves to be met with a straight

2. c4 when the gambit 2...b5 3. Bxb5 Bb7 looks easily contained after 4. d3!

More natural is:

2. d4 e6

Now 3. Nc3 or 3. Bd3 lead to normal positions.

But you might fancy 3. Be3 (to slow up ...c5) 3...Bb7 4. f3 when Black is short of obvious counterplay and White may start to fancy 5. c4!. If you grab the c5 pawn, remember, the best way to treat a gambit is to be prepared to return the material to mess up your opponent's position.

1... e6 2. d4 a6 3. Bd3

rnbqkbnr
+ppp+ppp
p+-+p+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-+B+-+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-NR

Basman has often played

3...b5 4. Nf3 Bb7 5. O-O c5 6. c3 Nf6 7. Re1

rn-qkb-r
+b+p+ppp
p+-+pn-+
+pp-+-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-PB+N+-
PP-+-PPP
RNBQR-K-

...which he calls the Main Line. Now he has tried

7... h6

Why on earth should he do this? Well, after

7... Qb6

[7... Nc6? 8. d5 exd5 9. exd5+ Ne7 10. d6]

8. a4 cxd4 9. cxd4 Nc6 10. axb5

r+-+kb-r
+b+p+ppp
pqn+pn-+
+P+-+-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-+B+N+-
-P-+-PPP
RNBQR-K-

10... Nb4 11. Nc3 Nxd3 12. Qxd3 axb5 13. Rxa8+ Bxa8 14. Bf4

[14. Bg5 b4]

14...Bb4 15. Bg5!

b+-+k+-r
+-+p+ppp
-q-+pn-+
+p+-+-B-
-b-PP+-+
+-NQ+N+-
-P-+-PPP
+-+-R-K-

Black was under a lot of pressure in Nicholson-Basman 1980. Black recovered but I can't fancy Black's position]

Alternatively

[7... Be7 8. Nbd2 Nc6 9. e5 Nd5 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Ne4 Be7 12. a4 Qb8 13. Bg5 f6

[13... Nxe5 14. Nxe5 Qxe5 15. Nf6+]

14. exf6 gxf6 15. Bh4

rq-+k+-r
+b+pb-+p
p+n+pp-+
+p+n+-+-
P+-+N+-B
+-PB+N+-
-P-+-PPP
R-+QR-K-

and Black is very loose, as in Lewis-Basman 1980]

In each line Bg5 was a big headache, so Basman, never deterred, tried 7...h6

8. Nbd2 Be7 9. e5 Nd5 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Ne4 Be7 12. a4

rn-qk+-r
+b+pbpp-
p+-+p+-p
+p+nP-+-
P+-+N+-+
+-PB+N+-
-P-+-PPP
R-BQR-K-

Often an awkward move to meet

12... bxa4 13. Rxa4 Qc7 14. Bb1 Nb6 15. Nd6+ Bxd6 16. exd6 Qd8 17. Rg4

rn-qk+-r
+b+p+pp-
pn-Pp+-p
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+R+
+-P-+N+-
-P-+-PPP
+BBQR-K-

Hennigan-Basman 1991; White won quickly.

 

 

D4(c) the Borg Defence 1. e4 g5

rnbqkbnr
pppppp+p
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-p-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPPP-PPP
RNBQKBNR

(Borg=Grob reversed) which can be met by

2. d4 h6 3.

Bd3

d6

[or 3... Bg7 4. Ne2 c5 5. c3 Nc6 6. Be3

r+bqk+nr
pp+pppb-
-+n+-+-p
+-p-+-p-
-+-PP+-+
+-PBB-+-
PP-+NPPP
RN+QK-+R

Keene

6... cxd4 7. cxd4 Qb6 8. Nbc3 Nxd4 9. Nd5!]

4. Ne2

e.g.

4...c5

Now

5. dxc5 dxc5 6. Ng3 Nc6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Re1+/-

or

5. c3 Nc6 6. O-O Nf6 7. Nd2 Qc7 8. b4

r+b+kb-r
ppq-pp+-
-+np-n-p
+-p-+-p-
-P-PP+-+
+-PB+-+-
P+-NNPPP
R-BQ+RK-

Nunn-Basman 1980; ...1-0

 

An alternative treatment is

[3. h4 g4

[3... gxh4 4. Nf3]

4. Qxg4 d5 5. Qf3 dxe4 6. Qxe4 Nf6 7. Qd3 Nc6 8. Be3 Qd5 9. Nc3

r+b+kb-r
ppp-pp+-
-+n+-n-p
+-+q+-+-
-+-P-+-P
+-NQB-+-
PPP+-PP+
R-+-KBNR

 

 

Example games D4

|Hennigan- Accardo, Roma, 199|

1. e4 a6 2. d4 b5 3. Nf3 Bb7 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. Qe2 e6 6. a4 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Nbd2 b4 9. e5 Ng4 10. O-O d5 11. Nb3 Ba7 12. h3 h5

rn-qk+-r
bb+-+pp-
p+-+p+-+
+-+pP-+p
Pp-+-+n+
+N+B+N+P
-PP+QPP+
R-B-+RK-

A hasty sacrifice

13. Bg5! Qc7 14. hxg4 hxg4 15. Nfd4 g3 16. Rae1 gxf2+ 17. Rxf2 Nd7 18. Nxe6 Qb6 19. Ned4 Nc5 20. Qf3 Qc7 21. Nxc5 Bxc5 22. c3 Kf8 23. Ne6+ 1-0

A dismal game for Black.

 

|
Regis,D - Dansey,P, 1993

Please forgive this one of mine but it's the only 'belt down the centre' example I have.

1. e4 e6 2. d4 a6 3. Nf3 b5 4. Bd3 c5 5. c3 Bb7 6. O-O Nf6 7. Re1

[7. Qe2 c4]

7... Be7

[7... h6 Basman]

8. Nbd2 Nc6 9. a4 b4 10. e5 ?!

[better 10. dxc5 first, or maybe 10. Nb3 !?]

10... Nd5 11. Ne4 cxd4 12. cxd4 =+

[12. c4 Nb6 13. b3 was an interesting sacrifice that I didn't have the courage for]

12... Qb6 13. Bc4 Na5 14. b3 Rc8 15. Qd3 Qc6 16. Bg5

-+r+k+-r
+b+pbppp
p+q+p+-+
n-+nP-B-
PpBPN+-+
+P+Q+N+-
-+-+-PPP
R-+-R-K-

[16 ... Nxc4 probably wins a safe pawn! - 16. Bxd5 Qxd5 was the only way to hang on to it]

16... f5

[16... Nxc4 17. Bxe7 Kxe7 18. bxc4 Qxc4 19. Qd2 Qc7 20. Nd6 Rb8 21. Qg5+ with probably not enough compensation]

17. exf6 Nxf6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19.d5

with the lines opening against the Black King, the rest is a rout.

19...Qc7 20. dxe6 Bxe4 21. exd7+ Qxd7 22. Qxe4 Nxc4 23. bxc4 Kf7 24. Rad1 Qc7 25. Qe6+ Ke8 26. Qxf6 Rf8 27. Qe6 b3 28. Ne5 1-0

[28. Ne5 Rf6 29. Qg8+ Rf8 30. Qxh7 b2 31. Qg6+]

 

Caillet - Paul, Paris, 1989

1. e4 e6 2. d4 b6 3. Bd3 Bb7 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Qe2 h6

Black will regret this move...

7. O-O Bxc3 8. bxc3 d6 9. e5 Nd5 10. Bd2 Ne7 11. Rae1 d5 12. Nh4 Nd7

r+-qk+-r
pbpnnpp-
-p-+p+-p
+-+pP-+-
-+-P-+-N
+-PB+-+-
P+PBQPPP
+-+-RRK-

A model position for White; the advance of the f-pawn decides because of the weakness on g6.

13. f4 c5 14. f5 c4 15. fxe6 cxd3 16. Qh5 g6 17. exf7+ 1-0

17... Kf8 18. Bxh6+ Rxh6 19. Qxh6# 1-0

 

Erben - Foerster, 1989

1. e4 g5 2. d4 Bg7 3. Bxg5 c5 4. Be3 cxd4 5. Bxd4 e5 6. Be3 Ne7 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Nf3 f5 9. Bc4+ Kh8 10. Ng5 Qe8 11. Nb5 Qg6 12. Nd6 Bf6 13. Ngf7+

rnb+-r-k
pp+pnN+p
-+-N-bq+
+-+-pp+-
-+B+P+-+
+-+-B-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+QK-+R

1-0

 

 

E. A repertoire for attacking the unusual 1...e5 defences

I assume you will aim for the

Giuoco Piano

, an opening I expect you won't tire of for a year or two.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3

This is the natural follow-up, developing the Knight to its best square and attacking the Black e-pawn. Good alternatives include 2. f4 (

King's Gambit

) and 2. Bc4 (

Bishop's Opening

), although the

Vienna Opening

2. Nc3 has rather fallen from favour.

 

Black has all sorts of alternatives in reply to 2. Nf3, most of which needn't delay us for long. The

Queen's Pawn Counter-Gambit

(or

Elephant Gambit

) 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3

d5

can be met by 3. exd4 e4 4. Qe2 and 5. d3. The

Damiano Defence

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3

f6

is refuted by 3. Nxe5! Qe7! 4. Nf3 and now both 4...

Qxe4

+ 5. Be2 and 4...

d5

5. d3 dxe4 6. dxe4 Qxe4+ 7. Be2 leave White about to go further ahead in development with Nc3.

The most important deviations are:

Hungarian Defence with 3...Be7

Petroff's Defence 2...Nf6

This is my current recommendation for junior players against the 1. e4 player; please refer to the separate booklet.

Philidor's Defence 2...d6

This is probably the strongest of the non-standard defences, and is practiced by many strong county players.

Latvian Gambit 2...f5

It is claimed by Levy and Keene that this defence can be defeated by learning the lines that follow 3. Bc4

 

 

E1. Hungarian Defence

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Be7

r+bqk+nr
ppppbppp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-p-+-
-+B+P+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPPP-PPP
RNBQK-+R

This is a solid but passive defence with links to

Philidor's Defence

. It is quite in order to play

4. d4 d6

and now the books say play

5. h3,

though Spassky (an attacking player) recommends

5. Nc3

and Mednis (an endgame specialist) recommends

5. dxe5.

I think this is the easiet.

Now 5...Nxe5? 6. Nxe5 dxe5 7. Qh5!

r+bqk+nr
ppp-bppp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-p-+Q
-+B+P+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
RNB-K-+R

!wins a pawn so the line goes

5...dxe5 6. Qxd8+ Bxd8 7. Nc3.

r+bbk+nr
ppp-+ppp
-+n+-+-+
+-+-p-+-
-+B+P+-+
+-N-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-B-K-+R

White can complete development with Be3 and O-O, and should aim to keep pieces on with a3 and/or h3. White can then try to open lines to exploit the space advantage and get the rooks into play.

Another line quoted by Mednis is 5. exd5 exd5 6. Bd5!? Bd6 7. Ng5! Nh6 8. c3!

 

 

E2. Philidor Defence

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6

Now play

3. d4

when Black has a choice between 3...Nd7, 3...Nf6 and 3...dxe4. 3...f5 is occasionally played, too.

 

E2.1 Philidor Defence with 3...Nd7

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7

4. Bc4

This line gives Black all sorts of headaches:

 

E2.1.1 Philidor Defence with 4...Be7

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 Be7

You can now win a pawn with

5. dxe5 Nxe5

(not 5...dxe5?? 6. Qd5!)

6. Nxe5 dxe5 7. Qh5!

r+bqk+nr
pppnbppp
-+-p-+-+
+-+-p-+-
-+BPP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

 

 

|
E2.1.2 Philidor Defence with 4...h6

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 h6

r+bqkbnr
pppn+pp-
-+-p-+-p
+-+-p-+-
-+BPP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

Now

5. dxe5 Nxe5 6. Nxe5 dxe5 7.Bxf7+!

r+bqkbnr
ppp-+Bp-
-+-+-+-p
+-+-p-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

wins a pawn

Or

5. dxe5 dxe5 6. Bxf7+! Kxf7 7. Nxe5+ Kf6 8. Qd4

with a deadly attack.

 

 

E2.1.3 Philidor Defence with 4...Ngf6

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 Ngf6

r+bqkb-r
pppn+ppp
-+-p-n-+
+-+-p-+-
-+BPP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

Now

5. dxe5 Nxe5

(not 5...dxe5 6. Ng5!)

6. Nxe5 dxe5 7. Bxf7+

wins a pawn:

r+bqkb-r
ppp-+Bpp
-+-+-n-+
+-+-p-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

7...Kxf7 8. Qxd8 Bb4+ 9. Qd2 Bxd2+ 10. Nxd2

 

E2.1.4 Philidor Defence with 4...c6

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nd7 4. Bc4 c6

r+bqkbnr
pp+n+ppp
-+pp-+-+
+-+-p-+-
-+BPP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQK-+R

This is the only way to survive, but White can still press hard with 5. Nc3. After 5...h6 6. a4! is the way to keep the edge. A well-known line goes:

5. Nc3 Be7 6. dxe5 dxe5 7. Ng5 Bxg5

(7...Nh6 8. Ne6! wins)

8. Qh5 g6

(or 8...Qf6 9. Bxg5 Qg6 10. Qh4 +-

r+b+k+nr
pp+n+ppp
-+p+-+q+
+-+-p-B-
-+B+P+-Q
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+-K-+R

Schlechter-Alekhin 1910)

9. Qxg5 Qxg5 10. Bxg5.

r+b+k+nr
pp+n+p+p
-+p+-+p+
+-+-p-B-
-+B+P+-+
+-N-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-+-K-+R

This position is much easier to play for White, and when it has been reached White players have a huge plus score from here. White will play O-O-O and double rooks on the d-file. There is no way for White to penetrate further than playing Rd6 just yet, but b2-b4-b5 should either win the c6 pawn or produce the exchange ...cxb5, Nxb5 with huge pressure.

 

E2.2 Philidor Defence with 3...Nf6

rnbqkb-r
ppp-+ppp
-+-p-n-+
+-+-p-+-
-+-PP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQKB+R

The counterattack on the e-pawn gives Black a moment to get organised.

After

4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bc4 Be7

r+bqk+-r
pppnbppp
-+-p-n-+
+-+-p-+-
-+BPP+-+
+-N-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
R-BQK-+R

and now

6.

dxe5

(BCO gives 6.Ng5!?),

then

6...

dxe5

? seems to be a mistake because of 7. Ng5 O-O 8. Bxf7+ Rxf7 9. Ne6 Qe8 10. Nc7 Qd8 11. Nxa8. Now after 11...b5 12. Nd5! should win. Instead

6...

Nxe5

7. Nxe5 dxe5 7. Qxd8+

or 7. Qe2

gives White the edge. Moves like Rd1 or O-O and f4 will keep Black sweating for some time to come.

 

E2.3 Philidor Defence with 3...exd4

rnbqkbnr
ppp-+ppp
-+-p-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-pP+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
RNBQKB+R

Generally this gives Black a long-term space problem, and White can play 4. Nxd4, 5. Bc4, 6. O-O, 7. Re1 and so on without difficulty.

The line 4. Nxd4 g6 imitates the sharp Dragon Variation of the Sicilian but while White can still execute the standard attack on the Black King's-side (f3, Be3, Qd2, O-O-O, h4-h5, Bh6, etc.), the absence of a half-open c-file for Black makes the counterattack more difficult to get going.

Another way to play for White (as in the famous game Adams-Torre) is 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd2 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Nc3 Nf6 8. Bg5 Be7 9. O-O-O O-O 10. Rhe1

r+-q-rk+
ppp-bppp
-+bp-n-+
+-+-+-B-
-+-QP+-+
+-N-+N+-
PPP+-PPP
+-KRR-+-

with attacking chances.

4. Nxd4 g6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Qd2 O-O 8. O-O-O Re8

or 8...Nc6 9. f3 Nxd4 10. Bxd4 Be6 11. g4+/- BCO2

9. f3 Nc6

[now 10. g4 is given in BCO2, e.g. 10...Ne5 11. Be2 a6 12. Bh6 Bh8 13. h4 b5 13. h4 b5 14. Bg5 c5 15. Nf5! gxf5 16. gxf5 Bb7 17. Bh6 +-, Owen-Wrinn corr. 1985]

10. h4 !?

r+bqr+k+
ppp-+pbp
-+np-np+
+-+-+-+-
-+-NP+-P
+-N-BP+-
PPPQ-+P+
+-KR+B+R

10... Ne5

[10... h5 should also lead to a speedy attack against the black king after, say, Bg5 and a later g4. If you aren't sure about this, play 10. g4]

11. h5 Nxh5

[11... c5

[what else? ]

now 12. Nb3 intending 13.Qxd6 or 13.Nxc5]

E2.4 Philidor counter-gambit 3...f5

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 f5

BCO2 denies all knowledge of this option. I discover Tony Kosten covered it in " Winning with the Philidor ." He calls it " Mestel's Variation " after JM's use of it at the European Junior Championships in the 1970s.

Kosten gives a couple of lines like:

[4. exf5 e4 5. Ng5 Bxf5 6. Nc3 d5 7. f3 e3 8. Bxe3 h6 9. Nh3 Bxh3 10. gxh3 Be7 11. Bf2 Bf6 12. Qd2 Ne7 13. O-O-O Nbc6 "...reasonable play for the pawn" KOSTEN]

[or 4. dxe5 fxe4 5. Ng5 d5 6. e6 Nh6 7. Nc3 c6 8. Ngxe4 dxe4 9. Qh5+ g6 10.Qe5 Rg8 11. Bg5 Bg7 12. e7 Qd5 !

Murey's move, which again Kosten reckons is OK for Black.]

But Fritz dismisses the whole thing with

4. Nc3 fxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 6. Nxe5! dxe4 7. Qh5

rnbqkbnr
pppp+-pp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-N-+Q
-+-Pp+-+
+-+-+-+-
PPP+-PPP
R-B-KB+R

e.g. 7...g6 8. Nxg6 hxg6 9. Qxg6!? Kd7! 10. Qf5+ Ke8 11. Qe5, getting the rook AND the pawn, with enduring discomfort for the Black King]

 

 

E3 Latvian Gambit 2... f5

rnbqkbnr
pppp+-pp
-+-+-+-+
+-+-pp+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+N+-
PPPP-PPP
RNBQKB+R

3. Nxe5

This is the simplest way to gain the advantage

[Keene and Levy claim a win for White after 3. Bc4 fxe4 4. Nxe5 Qg5, but there is much to study here and Black players are likely to be better rehearsed in the traps]

3... Qf6 4. d4 d6 5. Nc4 fxe4 6. Nc3

White has a simple advantage

 

 

Example Games E

Darned if I could find any recent games in any of these lines. When they occur White GMs tend to avoid any theory (in case of improvements) and just play solid, hoping the inferior moves chosen by Black will prove disadvantageous in any line.

Alekhin - Marco, Stockholm, 1912

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bc4 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Qe2

[7. h3 is better we now think]

7... c6 8. a4

r+bq-rk+
pp+nbppp
-+pp-n-+
+-+-p-+-
P+BPP+-+
+-N-+N+-
-PP+QPPP
R-B-+RK-

White is not so much concerned for promoting his own position as restricting his opponent's. This is not a totally easy thing to do, and you may see good Black players adopt the Philidor to keep the pieces on and the game closed.

8... h6 9. Bb3 Qc7 10. h3 Kh7 11. Be3 g6 12. Rad1 Kg7

r+b+-r-+
ppqnbpk-
-+pp-npp
+-+-p-+-
P+-PP+-+
+BN-BN+P
-PP+QPP+
+-+R+RK-

all that to get the Rf8 into play

13. Nh2 Ng8 14. f4 f6 15. Qg4 exd4 16. Bxd4 Nc5 17. f5 Nxb3 18. Qxg6+ Kh8 19. cxb3 Bd7 20. Qg3 Rf7 21. Ng4

r+-+-+nk
ppqbbr+-
-+pp-p-p
+-+-+P+-
P+-BP+N+
+PN-+-QP
-P-+-+P+
+-+R+RK-

With the threat of e5

21... Qd8 22. Ne2

Aiming at e6

22... Rg7 23. Nf4 Qe8 24. Qh4 Qf7 25. Rd3

Going for mate, rather than winning the pawn at h6

25... Kh7 26. Ng6

r+-+-+n+
pp+bbqrk
-+pp-pNp
+-+-+P+-
P+-BP+NQ
+P+R+-+P
-P-+-+P+
+-+-+RK-

With the striking idea Rf4 and Nxh6, Nxh6; Qxh6+ Kxh6; Rh4+ Kg5 and mate follows

26... Rxg6 27. fxg6+ Qxg6 28. Bxf6 Bxg4 29. Bxe7 Re8 30.Rxd6

The White pieces close in for the kill

30... Qg7 31. Bf6 Nxf6 32. Rfxf6

1-0

Index of games

Ourmet,J - Cierniak,P (1) Paris, 1989

Iskov,G - Woge Nielsen,J, it, Kobenhavn, 1989


Karaklajic,N - Marjanovic,Z (3) Pula, 1990 [B02]

Lendwai - Neckar,L, Nova-Park/SW,2,21, 1989 [B02]

Madl,I - Guadalpi,D (1) Val-Thorens, 1989 [B02]

Weiss,M - Shields,P (5), Chicago, 1989 [B02]

Kavalek-Andersson 1978


De Armas,A - Jensen,C (7) Novi, 1990 [B18]

Haas,C - Trachsel, Arosa, 1990 [B18]

Rodriguez,Danie - Ruxton,K (6) WchJ, 1989 [B18]

Schlindwein,R - Hugger,M (1) Badenweiler, 1990 [B18]

Zuber,M - Halmkin,P (Exeter Vs Teignmouth, 1995)

Alekhin - Fahrni, Mannheim, 1914


Cid,M - Araya,R (4) Copa, 1989[C13]

Djurhuus,R - Minero,S (7) Santiago, 1990[C13]

Sokolov - Shemiakin, T, Simferopol, 1989[C13]

Zeh,H - Bahry,J, Baden-Baden, 1989[C13]

Miles - Reefschlager, Porz, 1982


Conejero,J. M - Perez Torres,J [C15], Valencia

Ristic,Nen - Sanchis, A [C15], Chartres

Westerinen,H - Bergsson,S [C15], Gausdal

Abdulla,M - Khechen,N [C15], Novi

Castillo,O - Segovia,J [C15], WchJ

De Eccher,S - Schneiders,A [C15], Lugano

Tarrasch - Mieses[C30], Berlin Match (3) , 1916

Hort,V - Rota [B07], Aachen/SW,16,18

Christ,R - Kljako,D [B07], it, Biel

Knippel,M - Stratmann,B [B08], NRW

Adams,M - Wolff,P [B07], London

Lane,G - Saucey,M [B07], Royan

Chacon,E - Blazquez,J. L [B07], Alicante

Basman-Stean,Hastings 1974


Georgiev,Kr - Feher,G [B30], Cappelle

Smirin,I - Nun,Ji [B30], Polanica

Bogumil - Sarosi [B30], Budapest

Lazarevic,M - Maric,D (6) Pula, 1990[B02]

Van der Vaeren - Savva, Haifa, 1989[A00]

Hill,S - Wright,A , ch-AUS/SW,5,18, 1989[B21]

Campora,D. H - Shirazi,A , Ch New York ( open ), 1989[B21]

Ekebjaerg,Ove (2580) - Van Manen,Gerben (2580) cr Blass-mem, 1990[B07]

Mednis-Vadasz 1978


Bareev - Norwood, Marseilles, 1990[B09]

Hodgson - Ady, Streatham Vs Ymca, London, 1981[B23]

Hebden - Large, British Ch'p, 1982[B21]

Plaskett - Howell, British Ch'p, 1983[B21]

Ekebjaerg,Ove - Danner,Georg, cr Nielsen-mem, 1987


Hodgson - Nunn, Aaronson Open, 1978[B23]

Spassky - Geller, Candidates, 1968

Psakhis - Kasparov, La Manga, 1990 [compare B23]


Smyslov - Romanishin, Moscow, 1976 [B23]

Belavanets - Bronstein 13th USSR semi-final, 1941

Petrosian - Pachman, Bled, 1961


Kaulfuss,H - Diaz,Joa.C (4) Hessen-ch, 1989[B02]

Fischer,Robert J - Fauber,Richard Milwaukee Northwestern, 1957

Fischer - Ibrahimoglu, Siegen, 1970

Hennigan - Hastings, Dundee, 1993

Ciocaltea - Kozma, Sochi, 1963

Fischer,RJ - Geller,U, Natanya, 1968

Bronstein - Uhlmann, Moscow, 1971

Fischer - Miagmasuren, Sousse, 1967

Fischer - Ivkov, Santa Monica, 1967


Short - Donner, Amsterdam, 1982 [B07]

Fischer,Robert J - Sherwin,James T, New Jersey, 1957

Smyslov - Botvinnik, USSR Ch, 1955

Yudasin-Jukic, Bern 1989

Dvoretsky - Vulfsson, USSR, 1986


Karlsson - George, Torbay, 1994[B40]

Van Geet - Guyt [A00] Paramaribo, 1967

Brouwn,Arnold - Perrenet,Jacob cr, 1971

Ekebjaerg,Ove - Strand,Torger cr Nielsen-mem, 1987

Leeners - Simon, Netherlands, 1979

Van Geet,Dick - Van der Zijpp,B, Haarlem, 1991


Suba,M - Bellon, Bucharest, 1978[A00]

Ratsch - Schwarz, DDR tt, 1969 [A00]

Schlenker,Rainer - Zimmermann,G, Heidelberg, 1985[A00]

Staples,M - Lee,G, England, 1976[A00]

Van Geet,Dick - Lee, Wijk aan Zee III, 1979[A00]

Tong,Y - Webster,A [B08], Ch World Cadet's ( under 18 ), Singapore

Bousum,J - Forbis,R [B08], It (open), Chicago

Goring - NN, Berlin, 1890[B00]

Schlenker,Rainer - Fuchs,D, Germany, 1985 [B00]

Hennigan - Accardo, Roma, 1990

Regis,D - Dansey,P, 1993

Caillet - Paul, Paris, 1989

Alekhin - Marco, Stockholm, 1912

Chess Quotes

"On the chess-board lies and hypocrisy do not survive long."
— -- Em. LASKER