The Trebuchet

In an all-parent encounter last week, the players stumbled upon this position, known as the Trebuchet. A trebuchet is a big wooden catapult, and its connection with this position is not known, except that it may catapult a player from joy to despair...

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----Kp--
-----Pk-
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Normally, it's an advantage for it to be your turn so you can get on with your plan, but in this position, whoever has to move next, loses! Can you see how?

The situation of an unhappy forced move is called Zugzwang; it's not ever so common but more unusual is this situation where BOTH sides are in Zugzwang.

P.S. Interested in this sort of thing? Here are some more:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/simplest-mutual-full-point-zugzwangs

Chess Quotes

"A lot of the difference between an IM and GM is a seriousness to the game. The GM is willing to go through all this. He's willing to put up with anything. This shows his dedication. One other thing is the GMs superiority in tactics. For example Christiansen can find tactics in any position. If you're a GM you should be able to overpower the IM tactically. The GM will often blow out the IM in this area. "
— Nick de FIRMIAN, in How To Get Better at Chess : Chess Masters on Their Art by GM Larry Evans, IM Jeremy B Silman and Betty Roberts

EDITORIAL NOTE: This of course contradicts David Norwood's view. While David's opinion is based on research, I think Nick's is the correct one. I have a wonderful proof of this theorem, but unfortunately this page is too small to hold it. - Dr.Dave.