Exeter Junior Chess Club

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Exeter Junior Chess Club

offers competitions, matches, coaching and
friendly chess every week
large_change1.jpg Exeter Junior Chess Club Blog

News and games
large_TIMSCOR3.GIF
(and other games)
large_10race2.gif
We meet FRIDAYS
between September and May from 5:30pm at

Heavitree Social Club,
Wingfield Park, 2 East Wonford Hill, Exeter

EX1 3BS
[MAP]
Look out for tips:
Random Chess Tips

Pages on this site about junior chess

[You might also get something out of material designed for adults in class D.]
Updated Sat 23 Nov 2013

The replacement of pieces in Exchange Chess reminds me of the game of
Japanese Chess, properly called Shogi, the generals' game. The flat
pieces are marked with kanji characters that are confusing for most people
brought up with the Roman alphabet, but I do own a German-made version
of the game which uses pieces marked with their powers of movement.
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/portable-shogi-set
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/childrens-shogi-set
http://stggames.com/STGStore//catalog/popup_image.php?pID=276

Players in secondary schools can struggle to practise. Your computer or smartphone can be a sparring partner, but that's not the same as playing real people. You can play online but the behaviour and language of some adults is pretty terrible.

But now...

What is Yes2Chess?

The U14s were mad keen to play Exchange Chess all day, and lobbied for a competition... DB Pritchard's Encyclopedia of Chess Variants calls this Tandem Chess or Double Bughouse Chess, but I've only ever heard it called Exchange Chess in the UK. The game is played with competing teams of two players, and captured pieces are recycled with 'drops', so the play remains in the middlegame.
Thanks to everyone who came to the U14 training day, and special thanks to Tim and Sally for their support. Whether or not you were there, you might find it useful to have a look at the links below. I hope you will find everything we showed you on the day and a few more things that we didn't have time for. This page has links to all the computer software I showed you, too.

A cracking start to the season, with Newton Abbot blooding some new talent. I hope this result doesn't discourage them! In fact, the opposition board 1 scored ahead of the entire Exeter team at the Devon Championships, so as is often the case, the result is more lop-sided than the games.

Reece Whittington 1-0 Jim Knott
Taylor Finch 1-0 Ben Sanders-Wyatt
Edmund Kelly 1-0 Toby Donaghue
Leif Hafstad 1-0 Calum Germain

[pgn]
[Event "Bloodworth Cup"]
[Site "Newton Abbot"]
[Date "2013.??.??"]
[Round "?.4"]
[White "Germain"]
[Black "Hafstad"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C00"]

December: Prize list for Devon Junior Chess Championships:
http://www.chessdevon.co.uk/HTML/News/jchess/base.htm

January: New Devon Junior grades are out!
http://onionschess.co.uk/content/devon-junior-grading-list

Proposed U14 Training Day: Sat 1st February, Exeter.
Details tba.

I hope your school runs a Chess Challenge competition this Spring, and I hope you qualify! But if one of those things is not true, there is always the...

pNbRqK

LAST CHANCE SALOON
kQrBnP

UK Schools Chess Challenge
9:30am Saturday 10th May at Bowhill School, Exeter, EX4 1JT
ENTRY FEE £9.00 (please make cheques payable to DJCA)

Problems worthy
of attack
prove their worth
by hitting back
– Piet Hein

"Haste (is) the great enemy" -- Eugene Znosko-Borovsky It was good to see so many players yesterday at the Riviera tournament. My spies in the next room told me that the crucial game in the U9 tournament yesterday was over in 8 minutes, with both players bashing moves out at high speed. I didn't see the game, but I suspect there were some mistakes on both sides.

[pgn]
[Event "English County U18"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.06.24"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Sudhakar, Ragul"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C55"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{Some natural moves by White led to the win of a piece, almost by accident.} 1.
e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. c3 d5 (4... Nxe4 {
This central pawn is OK to take.}) 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. d3 Be6 (6... Bg4 $5) (6...
Be7 $1) 7. Ng5 Qd6 (7... Bf5) 8. Qf3 $14 8... Be7 9. Nd2 h6 (9... Bxg5 10. Ne4
Qe7) 10. Nde4 Qd7 11. Nxe6 11... Qxe6 $4 (11... fxe6 $1) 12. Bxd5 $1 12... Qg6

Lesson 1. The first system to learn and play for both sides

 
Italian Game (Giuoco Piano) with c3
 

I'm going to have to wind into this one from a distance...

Mostly I play chess, but I know how to play some other games, and I'm
sort of generally interested in games in general.

http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/slideshow2

Game theory was much discussed from a mathematical angle when I was in
college, but what interests me more is the thoughts and feelings of game
players, which are usually far from mathematical.

[i]"It seems to us that the theories associated with board reconstruction
experiments represent an idealised picture of master chess which may be

A match of mostly short games, where the outgraded Newton Abbot team
must have been pleased to hold us off. There are some lessons about how
to win a game here:

1. Recognise when you are playing in a risky way - and do so only if you
have to.
2. Don't be afraid of ghosts!
3. If you like open games, then don't close the position.

You can download the games&notes in the PGN file.

(1)

{A shame to miss a win at the end, but you had the more promising
position throughout, so don't regret the missed win, take some pride in
the good game! }

[pgn]

Downloadable PGN games and PDF booklet are attached; the booklet has more and better comments

than the PGN file and this page.  Copies will soon be in the post for players.

{A well-organised king's-side attack in the Stonewall rather missed its mark
when Black refused to castle. In the end the open lines were used by Black to
attack you instead, but there was a little undermining tactic which would have
helped you, and a pin that would have helped your opponent.}
[pgn]
[Event "WWE Jamboree"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.03.23"]
[Round "1.1"]
[White "Susevee, Greg"]

Another close match which could have gone either way.

Some homework study may be required!

{Some simple tactics decided this game. In fact, they are the tactics most
often missed in junior games: discovered check, outnumbered, undermining.}

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs Seaton"]
[Site "Heavitree Social Club"]
[Date "2013.04.05"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Marsh, Bryan"]
[Black "Hafstad, Leif"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]
[PlyCount "85"]

1.e3 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 (2... e4 3. Nd4) 3. c3 Nf6 4. d3 d5 5. Qe2 Bf5 6. Nbd2 Bc5 7.

[Event "Berlin Jubilee"]
[Site "Berlin"]
[Date "1907.??.??"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Von Scheve, Theodor"]
[Black "Teichmann, Richard"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C53"]
[PlyCount "34"]
[EventDate "1907.??.??"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Qe7 5. O-O d6 6. d4 Bb6 7. a4 a6 8. a5 Ba7
9. h3 Nf6 10. dxe5 Nxe5 11. Nxe5 Qxe5 12. Nd2 Bxh3 13. gxh3 Qg3+ 14. Kh1 Qxh3+
15. Kg1 Ng4 16. Nf3 Qg3+ 17. Kh1 Bxf2 0-1

    LAST CHANCE SALOON

Delancey UK Schools Chess Challenge
9:30am Monday 6th May 2013 at Heavitree Social Club, Exeter, EX1 3BS
ENTRY FEE   £8.00   (please make cheques payable to EJCC)

This event is for all junior chess players in the Devon area who have not had a chance to qualify for the Devon MEGAFINAL on Sat 15th June, or who would like another chance to qualify.  (Please don't enter if you have already qualified!)

A terrific performance, I've rarely been more proud of a team.

We were giving away nearly 100 grading points over 4 boards, but came out on top without a single loss.

As always, things could have turned out differently, and Sidmouth fought for every square on every board.

{After some vague opening play on both sides, Black dropped an exchange.
After that, White gradually converted but Black had chances to draw (or do
even better) with some little tactics.}

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs Sidmouth"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.03.15"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Hafstad, L."]

This agreeable annual match is always a friendly and well-contested occasion. As usual, most of the games, and therefore the match, could
have had a very different result! Well played all.

Board 1. After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a
wicked trap.

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs TBGS"]
[Site "HSC"]
[Date "2013.02.08"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Blackmore, Joshua"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "64"]

{After missing a chance to win a piece in the opening, White fell into a

The best player of the late 1500s and early 1600s was Gioachino Greco, who showed this
idea in his writings:

[Event "Greek gift"]
[Site "sacrifice on h7 by B"]
[Date "1792.??.??"]
[Round "83"]
[White "greco"]
[Black "Anon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C00"]
[PlyCount "21"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Bd3 Nc6 4. Nf3 Be7 5. h4 O-O 6. e5 6... Nd5 { the
simplest setting for the sacrifice - sometimes known as the Greek Gift
after El Greco's pioneering analysis} 7. Bxh7+ Kxh7 8. Ng5+ Kg8 9. Qh5
Bxg5 10. hxg5 f5 11. g6 1-0

I was chatting about score sheets at the club last night - which only go
up to 70-80 moves.

Shortest possible game? Fool's Mate.

[Event "Fool's Mate"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "4"]

1. f4 e6 2. g4 Qh4# *

You don't usually get to play it but you can use the ideas:

[pgn]
[Event "Rex Willis Blitz Gambit Tournament"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2005.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Kuan, Franco"]
[Black "Waters, Simon"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A02"]
[PlyCount "10"]

I'm a bit bored of writing this, but the result doesn't reflect the closeness of the contests! Great result by Reece, saving us from the whitewash, but some great moves and terrific heart shown by all.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.01.16"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Brinkley, Alan"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C50"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{In a common type of position, Black lost a piece early on. Although Black
found some nice attacking ideas, a Knight got stranded on a5 and White found a

I mentioned a few things tonight and last week that I thought you might find interesting:

The Game of Life:
http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
http://www.math.com/students/wonders/life/life.html

The Opera Box Game:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/opera-box-game

The Slav and Semi-Slav:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/slav-or-semi

cheers

D

Well, a loss for the juniors, but by the narrowest of margins, and
against a team who were a bit stronger than they looked on paper. A
couple of the Gambits players have had much higher grades in the past,
and in the end I think experience told.

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Gambits"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.11.23"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Earnshaw, Terry"]
[Black "Finch, Codie"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D02"]
[PlyCount "83"]

{Black couldn't get started in the opening and soon lost a piece. Black then
really started playing, creating a counter-attack that was enough

At the Riviera Tournament on Saturday 6th October 2012, I plonked myself in a room and did an all-day drop-in coaching session.

This is what we talked about:

Here's eight of them!

The different types of tactic are:

jumps (discovery)
mates
forks
pins/skewers
nets &
ties (undermining and overloading)

Here's one of each:

[Event "2.1 Forks"]
[Site "Italy?, "]
[Date "1801.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Greco, G."]
[Black "NN"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C41"]
[Annotator "An ancient Queen fork"]
[PlyCount "11"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. h3 Nf6 4. c3 4... Nxe4 {
# After the Knight, the piece that is best for forks is the Queen} 5. Qa4+ c6
6. Qxe4 1-0

[pgn]
[Event "2.2 Pins"]
[Site "corr, "]
[Date "1986.??.??"]

The easiest way to learn is to remember the checkmate position:

[Event "checkmate"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "KR"]
[Black "K"]
[Result "1-0"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "R5k1/8/6K1/8/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 37"]
[PlyCount "0"]

* 1-0

You get checkmate at the edge of the board. You can force the defending King to the edge of the board by using the same idea:

[pgn]
[Event "Forcing position"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "KR"]
[Black "K"]
[Result "1-0"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "8/8/6k1/R7/6K1/8/8/8 w - - 0 23"]
[PlyCount "3"]

Sorry if that sounds a bit alarming!  What I mean is, after the summer break, you might find that your usual tactical sharpness has gone a bit rusty. 

To get back to your normal diamond-honed sharpness, you just need you get your eye back in with some practice.

Some things to practice are:

A report of the visit of the Devon County U18 Chess Team to compete in the English Junior County Championships.

National report: http://www.ecforum.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=3777&hilit=eton&start=15#p...
Local Report : http://www.chessdevon.co.uk/HTML/News/TBGS/base.htm and PHOTO http://www.chessdevon.co.uk/DSCN2758.JPG
Results: http://www.bjca.org.uk/results.php?eid=1716

Chess Quotes

"It was night. I went home and put my old house clothes on and set the chessmen out and mixed a drink and played over another Capablanca. It went fifty-nine moves. Beautiful, cold, remorseless chess, almost creepy in its silent implacability.

When it was done I listened at the open window for a while and smelled the night. Then I carried my glass out to the sink sipping it and looking at my face in the mirror.

'You and Capablanca,' I said."

— Raymond CHANDLER, The High Window, final sentences.