Exeter Junior Chess Club

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Exeter Junior Chess Club

offers competitions, matches, coaching and
friendly chess every week
large_change1.jpg Exeter Junior Chess Club Blog

News and games
large_TIMSCOR3.GIF
(and other games)
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We meet FRIDAYS
between September and May from 5:30pm at

Heavitree Social Club,
Wingfield Park, 2 East Wonford Hill, Exeter

EX1 3BS
[MAP]
Look out for tips:
Random Chess Tips

Pages on this site about junior chess

[You might also get something out of material designed for adults in class D.]

A tale of three discoveries: a discovered attack proved the winning move in all three games.

Unmasked threats - discovered attacks and discovered checks - are the
most difficult threats to spot. You pay attention to the piece that
moves, but the threat comes from the piece behind.

I've attached a discovered attack training page - get your eye in! In 2010, the Devon U14 team lost an awful lot of points (or a lot of awful points) to discovered attacks, and the puzzles are all things that they missed.

{Some over-cautious play by Black gave White some chances early on, but it

Our first win! Even without the point from 'super-sub' Ray Shepherd, we had a draw in the bank, and that would have been a good result too.

So, well done all round. In both other games there was a big chance for our side early on - so make sure you think right from the start, don't 'warm up' during the game!

{A bit of a tired performance by White: Black picked up pawns every few moves
and went into an endgame four pawns ahead. There were a couple of chances to
hit back, and the one on move 8 might have given a very different result.

"I thought I would try something different."

This doesn't usually go well! Here are two examples:

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Sidmouth"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.04.28"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Warburton, Ralph"]
[Black "Royle, James"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A60"]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. d4 e6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 Nf6 4. Nc3 d6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 b6 7. e4 Bb7 8. Be2 Nbd7
9. Nf3 g5 10. Bg3 Nh5 11. O-O Nxg3 12. fxg3 Nf6 13. e5 dxe5 14. Nxe5 exd5 15.
Qa4+ Ke7 16. Rae1 Qd6 17. Bf3 Ne4 18. Nxf7 Kxf7 19. Bxe4+ Ke7 20. Bxd5+ Kd8 21.

{A terrific scrap where both sides took and missed their chances. In the end
the struggle with the 32 pieces on the board was decided as much by the clock
as by the moves.}

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Tiverton"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.05.02"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Knowles, John"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D40"]
[PlyCount "106"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c5 4. e3 {
No threat to Black's survival, of course, but solid enough.} 4... Nc6 5. Nc3
Nf6 6. Bd3 {An invitation to play an IQP game.} 6... Bd6 (6... cxd4 7. exd4
dxc4 8. Bxc4 8... Be7 {

After this quick loss, Black was not sure what he did that was so bad. Come and look for clues with me...

[pgn]
[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Rutland, William"]
[Black "Stuart, Ben"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C55"]
[PlyCount "29"]

{After this quick loss, Black was not sure what he did that was so bad. Come
and look for clues with me...} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 3... Nf6 {
Nothing wrong with any of that - this is the fine Two Knights' Defence.} 4. Nc3
Bc5 (4... Nxe4 $1 {is the easiest way for Black to get at least an equal game.}

A close match ended in a 1-3 defeat for the youngsters. As so often in
chess, it wouldn't have taken much to reverse the score!

The juniors, unusually, fielded a team which had a majority of girls.

{1. A well-fought game: White got some attacking ideas muddled and lost a piece,
but pressure won the exchange leaving an exciting RvNN endgame.}

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs Exeter Gambits"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2012.03.30"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Trott, Tomas"]
[Black "Scholes, Richard"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C41"]
[PlyCount "91"]

Visiting the hospital recently I spotted a nice new game. You'll know the game Solitaire, where you reduce a set of pegs by capturing to a single survivor.(Peg Solitaire to the Yanks [what they call Solitaire, played with cards, we call Patience]).
http://www.web-games-online.com/peg-solitaire/

ThinkFun have produced a chess version, available as a physical set, or a mobile phone app that you can try for free.
http://www.thinkfun.com/solitairechess

You're given a position, and have to make a series of captures to reduce the number of pieces to one.

A fairly easy one:

Kriegspiel is a great game for three people and an audience. The audience has the most fun. It's like a cross between chess and battleships.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battleship_%28game%29

You're White, you have a chessboard and a set of chess pieces, your opponent has their own chessboard and pieces and plays black. You sit back to back. An umpire lets you know when your opponent has moved, if there is a capture or a check, and keeps a score. And that's more or less it!

http://www.chessvariants.org/incinf.dir/kriegspiel.html

Oliver and Leo had a go at this one, a favourite of mine:

RNB----k
--------
-------K
--------
--------
--------
pppppppp
--------

Over to you!

Need some help?

Read on...

Some points for starters:

If the Knight and Bishop move, that's checkmate, and in fact, no other mate in two seems possible.

Those are 8 black Pawns about to Queen, however.

So, move the Bishop somewhere, say, 1. Be6, to prevent the black King escaping.

Now, 1...a1Q 2.Na6#

And even 1...c1Q 2.Nc6# and 1...e1Q 2.N any #

But if Black promotes another pawn, it might be mate, but not in two.

A well-fought match which could have gone either way, with lots of good ideas shown by the players. I think in most games the advantage changed hands a couple of times - exciting stuff!

I've added the PGN file so you can play through the games and variations on your own computer.

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs TBGS"]
[Site "Palm Handheld"]
[Date "2012.02.24"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Trott, Tomas"]
[Black "Worsley, Elliott"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C11"]
[PlyCount "45"]

{White's home-made opening was good enough to get into a fair fight, and both

There is a free version of ChessBase's Fritz programme available:

http://freechess.50webs.com/fritz.html

Once you have saved one or a bunch of games, you might want to send them to someone. This is how:

Kevin Hurst has kindly been through the one-stop starter repertoire booklet and found a few errors, mostly small but one was absolutely colossal.

Updated files:
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/x/FTP/JuniorRepertoire.pdf
http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/x/PGN/juniorep.pgn

Oh, the colossal error? I left out some vital moves in a line of the French Advance:

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6

6.Be2 cxd4 7.cxd4 Nh6 (these moves were omitted)

When the Black Knight comes to h6, White might want to take it.

Basic Opening Repertoire for young players You want a standard opening to learn?

One of the best and best-contested matches I've had the pleasure to watch. Well done to all players!

W Royle ½-½ Fraser
B Trott ½-½ Whitehead
W Keat 1-0 Ramesh
B Terrill 0-1 Chornenkyy

A tough game fought in the jungles of a hypermodern opening, in the end Black's
exchange was enough to balance an advanced passed pawn - or maybe the
other way around!

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs. Newton Abbot Juniors"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2011.12.16"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Royle, James"]
[Black "Fraser, John"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B20"]
[PlyCount "83"]

--brrb--
--------
p-------
-------Q
-p-kpPp-
-P-pN-P-
---K----
--------

by Sam Loyd, 'Organ Pipes'

Solution in the comments!

What do I do with my old score sheets?

<tl;dr> version:

Enter the games on the computer and do something with them, like find other games with the same opening, or get a computer to suggest better moves.  In Windows XP, you can do all that for free using Fritz 5.32

List of free software for Windows: http://freechess.50webs.com/index.html
List of software for Macs: http://www.sigmachess.com/_macchesslinks/macchesslinks.html

[pgn]

[Event "Friendly"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2011.10.18"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Nagy, Dan"]
[Black "Keen, Charlie"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B23"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 ({Well, I thought you were planning to play} 3. f4
$1) 3... e6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 {This may not be a bad result, I know Charlie
has been looking to play systems with ...e5 not ...e6.} 5... Bc5 6. Be3 (6. Nb3
$5 {is logical and may give a slight plus} 6... Bb4 7. Be2 (7. Bd2)) (6. Ndb5
$1 {looks best to me, even though it means moving a piece twice.} 6... d6 7.

Trefor Thynne organised the first U18 team for a number of years to play in the English County Junior Championships at the end of the Summer Term. The match was held at Eton College.

Story and games appended.

Many thanks to Trefor for organising and to Robert Thompson for his notes to the games.

National report: http://www.englishchess.org.uk/?p=11931#more-11931
Local Report: http://www.chessdevon.co.uk/HTML/jt.doc
Results: http://www.bjca.org.uk/results.php?eid=1575

Half-term seems to have come upon us very suddenly! We normally shut the club for the summer at the May half-term, as attendance drops off so quickly when Summer arrives. So the last club night of this season will be Friday May 27th.

We might have a chat on Friday about what you might want to happen next season – more matches? fewer matches? some more coaching?

The first club night of the new season will be on Friday 16th September 2011. I'll write to you all in September to confirm this.

Training game with notes

[pgn]
[Event "Training"]
[Site "HSC"]
[Date "2011.05.13"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Nagy, Dan"]
[Black "Regis, D."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C31"]
[PlyCount "56"]

{An interesting scrap. Both sides need to be sharper tactically!} 1. e4 (1.
Nc3 d5 2. e4 d4 3. Nce2 3... e5 {is the same line from a different move order.}
) 1... e5 (1... d5 2. Nc3 d4 3. Nce2 3... e5 {and again! The right plan in
this position is to play Ng3 quickly and park the Bf1 on a useful square - c4
or b5 - and then maybe Nf3 and/or f4}) 2. f4 d5 3. Nc3 (3. exd5 $1 3... e4 {

News story from the BBC about Armenia

White missed a big chance early on with his home-made system, then kept the lid on Black's initiative later. White dropped a pawn while trying something on the King's-side, but when Black pushed his luck got a monster passed pawn. In the end, Black was grateful to be offered a perpetual check.

[pgn]
[Event "Friendly ECC"]
[Site "Palm Handheld"]
[Date "2011.04.08"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Nagy, Dan"]
[Black "Regis, D."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D00"]
[PlyCount "79"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nc3 (2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bf4 {is the London System}) 2... Nf6 3. Bf4 {

The Junior club will be meeting every Friday until the end of May,
including Friday 22nd and Friday 29th April.

Hope to see you there!

D

Ken Bloodworth, who donated the Cup for this junior chess league, died just over a week ago aged 96, playing chess even in his last year. A wonderful man and a player, who did so much for junior chess, not just in Devon but all over Britain.

Obituary at Keverel Chess: http://www.keverelchess.com/ken-bloodworth-1914-2011/
Biography at Keverel Chess: http://www.keverelchess.com/k-j-bloodworth-25-06-1914/

{This back-and-forth game was settling into a tense endgame when White allowed
a snap mate. Both sides allowed and missed chances!}

[pgn]

[Please ignore the stupid number of page visits, I think someone's robot threw a wobbly]

{
White eventually took a loose pawn and played good aggressive chess to wrap up.
}

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs Seaton"]
[Site "Palm Handheld"]
[Date "2011.03.25"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Frey, Adam"]
[Black "Marsh, Brian"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D00"]
[PlyCount "77"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 (2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bg5) 2... Nf6 3. Nc3 {
These square-knight openings are usually pretty duff, do find another one!} (3.
e3 e6 (3... Bf5 4. c4) 4. Bd3) (3. c4) 3... Nbd7 (3... Bf5) 4. Bg5 4... b6 {

Lots to enjoy in an evenly matched contest.

Board 1

{A well-played game by both sides. We don't see close endgames very often in
junior chess, and this was a fine one.}

[pgn]
[Event "Exeter Juniors vs. Exeter School"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2011.03.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Royle, James"]
[Black "Senior, Tom"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C50"]
[PlyCount "110"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 3... h6 {
Ooh, too slow. Playing quite that safe is dangerous!} 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Qf6
6. Be3 Bc5 7. c3 {White is a move ahead on the usual Scotch Game.} 7... b6 (

...when you are a piece down!

[Event "(Remove White's Queen Knight)"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1992.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Dorase"]
[Black "N.N."]
[Result "1-0"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/R1BQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "25"]
[EventDate "1992.??.??"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bb4+ 5. c3 dxc3 6. O-O cxb2 7. Bxb2 Bf8
8. Re1 d6 9. e5 dxe5 10. Nxe5 Qxd1 11. Bxf7+ Ke7 12. Ng6+ Kxf7 13. Nxh8# 1-0

Progress with openings booklets:
Title Difficulty PDF PGN
A first opening repertoire: Scotch Gambit, French Defence and Tarrasch Defence 2 PDF PGN
Italian Game 1
Two Knights' Defence 2
Playing Black when White avoids the 2ND 2

I've recently completed reviewing the games from the West and Wales Junior Jamboree event, held this year in Merthyr Tydfil.

The booklet is a PDF which can be seen/downloaded here: U14 Jamboree match booklet 2011.

This is the latest in a series; other editions can be found here: http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/content/junior-chess-games

Another close match, well done to all!

Board 1

[pgn]

[Event "EJCC vs TBGS"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2011.02.11"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Worsey, Elliot"]
[Black "Royle, James"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "50"]

{Black gets his King displaced early on and it gets caught by White's busy
pieces.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 {The Scotch Opening, a good system for
White which creates an immediate clash in the centre.} 3... d6 $6 {This allows
White to upset Black's development. I think you did that in your last game