Practical play

Club games

The Art of Analysis, Part 1

What's wrong with club players? An MOT for us all

The Art of Analysis, Part 2

Exeter Chess Club: Brilliancy Prize 1995

Exeter Chess Club: Internet Chess Challenge

The Great BICS Internet Chess Match

Club Games - Andrew Pickering at work

Taylor, M (1605) - Pickering, A (2000) (1503) [A21] Exeter vs. Rainham

1. c4 e5 2. g3

[2. Nc3]

2... f5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. e3

  (This is a good formation, going for a central roller, but obviously you need to look out for weak squares)

4... Nc6 5. Nc3 g6 6. d4 e4 7. f3

  (could have been saved up; Black isn't playing ...d5 yet)

7... exf3 8. Nxf3

  (White has a central pawn but must aim at e2-e4)

Steve Homer at work

Wood, DA (2200) - Homer, SJ (Surrey Open ) (2040) (7) [C04] praxis: positional sacrifice in club play, 1988

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 Nc6 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. e5 Nd7 6. Nb3 f6 7. Bf4 fxe5 8. dxe5 Be7 9. Bd3 O-O 10. Bg3 Nb4 11. Be2 c5 12. O-O a5 13. a3 Nc6 14. c4!? d4 15. Bd3


Club Games - Mark Blackmore on a roll

Annotations by the dead chuffed MB, interruptions by DR

Coburn - Blackmore, Mark (142) East Devon Major, 1996

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. g3 Be7 4. Bg2 d5 5. O-O O-O 6. a4


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Chess Quotes

"What distinguishes a Grandmaster from a master? Chess-lovers often ask questions like that. To many people it seems that Grandmasters simply calculate variations a little deeper. Or that they know their opening theory slightly better. But in fact the real difference is something else. You can pick out two essential qualities in which those with higher titles are superior to others: the ability to sense the critical moment in a game, and a finer understanding of various positional problems."
— Yusupov, in Opening Preparation