Practical play

Chess with Attitude


Phil Adams

"Games like this [Penrose-Botvinnik] (and there were plenty in this tournament) impressed on me that 'wanting to win' was perhaps more important than 'playing good moves'."
-- KEENE, 'Becoming a Grandmaster'.
"At that age (ten), the odd piece here or there often makes little difference.

Lessons from Bobby Fischer

Lessons from Morphy

  Morphy is probably the best player for the beginning player to study. Alas there are precious few games to go on, for he lived before the growth in international tournaments and was denied a match by Staunton.


  Morphy more or less perfected the art of winning in open games: smooth, fast development, opening up lines for the attack, dynamic piece play throughout the game, ruthless cashing in of advantages, wonderfully imaginative combination play. Even against inferior opposition he plays with great energy and balance.


Clock control

Simple Chess

Mark Blackmore

The aim of this session is to suggest some simple rules for how to get from 100 grade to the dizzy heights of 150. If applied firmly, I am convinced they will lead to better results without any extra study.

  This first game is more or less the opposite of how you ought to model your play: an unattainable standard of mayhem...

Lessons from Mikhail Tal

So many words have been written about Tal that my own observations are perhaps rather superfluous. The brilliance of his play and the dramatic way his wins are often achieved are apparent to all.

  For tonight's session, and with their instructional content in mind, I would just like to add that it was interesting to me how some of his most striking wins are introduced by apprently simple means - not striving for complications but building up with classically good moves.

Lessons from Lasker

Why do we lose?

Exeter Chess Club Simul 1995

Exeter Chess Club: Simultaneous Display Post Mortem

[Index to games at end of page]

  Although he obviously knows a lot of theory International Master Gary Lane wasn't out to play right down the line - he deviated in the sharper bits of theory against Mark and Steve. Rather, he played mostly solidly - certainly in only a few games did he set out for mate straight away.

Book review: The Sorcerer's Apprentice - Bronstein-Furstenberg

[This review first appeared in Westward Ho!]

Book review: The Sorcerer's Apprentice

by David Bronstein and Tom Furstenburg (1995) Cadogan 1995 ([[sterling]]?.??) 304pp.

This compilation is subtitled

40 Recommendations for the Novice; 40 Combinations with Explanations; 50 Games with Comments; 60 Games with Diagrams; 70 Picturesque Games

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Chess Quotes

"What distinguishes a Grandmaster from a master? Chess-lovers often ask questions like that. To many people it seems that Grandmasters simply calculate variations a little deeper. Or that they know their opening theory slightly better. But in fact the real difference is something else. You can pick out two essential qualities in which those with higher titles are superior to others: the ability to sense the critical moment in a game, and a finer understanding of various positional problems."
— Yusupov, in Opening Preparation