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Tal attacks

[pgn]
[Event "style: Tal on the attack (JUG "]
[Date "1959.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tal, M."]
[Black "Smyslov, V."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B10"]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. e4 c6 (1... e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Nbd7 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.
Nf3 Be7 8. Bd3 c5 9. Qe2 cxd4 10. O-O-O a6 11. Rhe1 Bd7 12. Nxd4 Qa5 13. Nf5 h6
{[#] Tal whips out another unclear sacrifical attack.} 14. Nxg7+ Kf8 15. Bxf6
Bxf6 16. Bc4 Qg5+ 17. Kb1 {[#] Barcza must have had a good old think, but
didn't fancy it.} Bb5 18. Bxb5 Qxg7 19. Ba4 b5 20. Bb3 Bxb2 21. Qe4 Re8 22.

Haste

"Haste (is) the great enemy" -- Eugene Znosko-Borovsky It was good to see so many players yesterday at the Riviera tournament. My spies in the next room told me that the crucial game in the U9 tournament yesterday was over in 8 minutes, with both players bashing moves out at high speed. I didn't see the game, but I suspect there were some mistakes on both sides.

as-Suli's Diamond

--------
--------
--------
---k----
--------
-KQ-----
--------
q-------
From Wikipedia (English):
The problem called "as-Suli's Diamond" went unsolved for over a thousand years. In shatranj, the "queen" (counsellor) is a very weak piece, able to move only a single square diagonally. It is also possible to win in shatranj by capturing all pieces except the king.

as-Suli commented:

“This ancient position is so difficult that there is no one in the world who would be able to solve it, except those I have taught to do so. I doubt whether anyone did this before me.

Games from the English County Junior Chess Championships 2013

[pgn]
[Event "English County U18"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.06.24"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Sudhakar, Ragul"]
[Black "Keat, Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C55"]
[PlyCount "65"]

{Some natural moves by White led to the win of a piece, almost by accident.} 1.
e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. c3 d5 (4... Nxe4 {
This central pawn is OK to take.}) 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. d3 Be6 (6... Bg4 $5) (6...
Be7 $1) 7. Ng5 Qd6 (7... Bf5) 8. Qf3 $14 8... Be7 9. Nd2 h6 (9... Bxg5 10. Ne4
Qe7) 10. Nde4 Qd7 11. Nxe6 11... Qxe6 $4 (11... fxe6 $1) 12. Bxd5 $1 12... Qg6

Summer Coaching Sessions 2013

7.30pm kickoff, in the small bar

Positions attached to the middlegame and escapes sessions

16th July Middlegame gym
Middlegame gym
"What I think might be quite good is to take a few positions – possibly not highly tactical ones – but then just look how you come up with candidates and plans etc

23rd July Opening Workshop
Openings Workshop 2013

A coaching challenge

I played at the East Devon Chess Congress earlier this year alongside my
longstanding friend and team-mate Charlie Keen. During a break between
games, we went over one of his encounters, looking for tips for next
time. The critical position was this one:

[Event "East Devon"]
[Site "Exeter"]
[Date "2013.03.03"]
[Round "?"]
[White "charles, keen"]
[Black "terence, greenaway"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "Critical position"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r4rk1/2p2ppp/p1n2q2/1p2pP1n/1P2P3/P2BB2P/2P3PK/3RQR2 w - - 0 20"]
[PlyCount "0"]

1-0

Hopes and fears

I'm going to have to wind into this one from a distance...

Mostly I play chess, but I know how to play some other games, and I'm
sort of generally interested in games in general.

http://exeterchessclub.org.uk/slideshow2

Game theory was much discussed from a mathematical angle when I was in
college, but what interests me more is the thoughts and feelings of game
players, which are usually far from mathematical.

[i]"It seems to us that the theories associated with board reconstruction
experiments represent an idealised picture of master chess which may be

EJCC 2-2 Newton Abbot Juniors

A match of mostly short games, where the outgraded Newton Abbot team
must have been pleased to hold us off. There are some lessons about how
to win a game here:

1. Recognise when you are playing in a risky way - and do so only if you
have to.
2. Don't be afraid of ghosts!
3. If you like open games, then don't close the position.

You can download the games&notes in the PGN file.

(1)

{A shame to miss a win at the end, but you had the more promising
position throughout, so don't regret the missed win, take some pride in
the good game! }

[pgn]

Wales and West of England Junior Jamboree 2013

Downloadable PGN games and PDF booklet are attached; the booklet has more and better comments

than the PGN file and this page.  Copies will soon be in the post for players.

{A well-organised king's-side attack in the Stonewall rather missed its mark
when Black refused to castle. In the end the open lines were used by Black to
attack you instead, but there was a little undermining tactic which would have
helped you, and a pin that would have helped your opponent.}
[pgn]
[Event "WWE Jamboree"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2013.03.23"]
[Round "1.1"]
[White "Susevee, Greg"]

EJCC 2-2 Seaton

Another close match which could have gone either way.

Some homework study may be required!

{Some simple tactics decided this game. In fact, they are the tactics most
often missed in junior games: discovered check, outnumbered, undermining.}

[pgn]
[Event "EJCC vs Seaton"]
[Site "Heavitree Social Club"]
[Date "2013.04.05"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Marsh, Bryan"]
[Black "Hafstad, Leif"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]
[PlyCount "85"]

1.e3 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 (2... e4 3. Nd4) 3. c3 Nf6 4. d3 d5 5. Qe2 Bf5 6. Nbd2 Bc5 7.

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Chess Quotes

THE ENGLISH SCHOOL OF ANALYSIS:
"The word "combination" means different things to different people."
"... I bid farewell to my readers in the hope that they have formed their own opinion as to the meaning of the word "combination"."
— Ray KEENE, The Chess Combination from Philidor to Karpov
"(3) 'IS IT A SYSTEM...?'
... Ultimately, I suspect, this is a question about which the reader should form his own judgement by study of the original text.
"